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1037587 
Journal Article 
High-performance liquid chromatographic method for simple and rapid determination of linezolid in human plasma 
Boak, LM; Li, J; Nation, RL; Rayner, CR 
2006 
Yes 
Biomedical Chromatography
ISSN: 0269-3879
EISSN: 1099-0801 
20 
782-786 
English 
A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed and validated for rapid quantification of linezolid in human plasma. Protein precipitation using a mixture of 5% trichloroacetic acid and methanol (3:1, v/v) provided a straightforward method of sample preparation and the internal standard eperezolid was employed. A concentration range from 0.20 to 40.0 mg/L was utilized to construct calibration curves, and analysis of low- (0.40 mg/L), medium- (7.50 mg/L) and high-quality (25.0 mg/L) control samples revealed excellent reproducibility (<or=3.88%) and accuracy (<or=4.20%). The recovery of both linezolid and eperezolid was approximately 100%. No interference was observed at the retention times of linezolid and eperezolid from blank plasma or eight commonly used antibiotics. Tests confirmed the stability of linezolid in plasma during three freeze-thaw cycles, on the bench during 24 h and during long-term storage of frozen plasma for up to 12 weeks; in extracts it was stable in the HPLC autosampler over 12 h. Overall, this assay offers a highly simplistic approach to quantifying linezolid in plasma, and would be well suited to clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and toxicodynamic analyses. 
linezolid; HPLC; plasma 
IRIS
• Methanol (Non-Cancer)
     Search 2012
          WOS
          ProQuest
 
Acetamides 
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid 
Drug Stability 
Humans 
Oxazolidinones 
Reproducibility of Results 
Sensitivity and Specificity 
 

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