Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Uranium


28,797 References Were Found:

Technical Report
Technical Report

Mine Injuries and Worktime, Quarterly. January through June 1989

Author: Anonymous (1900) HERO ID: 1433843

[Less] Charts and tables were used to portray the accident data occurring among miners from January through . . . [More] Charts and tables were used to portray the accident data occurring among miners from January through June of 1989. The tables included information concerning the number of fatal injuries in the mines for the United States in each quarter of 1987, 1988, and thus far in 1989; the number of operator injuries, injury incidence rates, average number of workers, employee hours, and production, by type of coal or mineral mined and work location; the number of operator injuries, average number of workers, employee hours and coal or mineral production by work location, state and mineral industry; the number of operator injuries by mineral industry, work location, and accident classification; and similar data for contractor injuries as opposed to operator injuries. Accidents were classified as fatal, nonfatal with days lost from work, and nonfatal with no time off the job. The types of mine noted in the report included bituminous coal mining, Pennsylvania anthracite coal, all coal, office workers at mining facilities, mineral, stone, sand and gravel, and metal mining operations. Underground and surface mining operations were included along with mills and preparatory facilities.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Epidemiologic Studies Of Lung Disease Among Miners Exposed To Increased Levels Of Radon Daughters

Author: Archer, VE (1900) (13-22). (NIOSH/00132162). HERO ID: 1431951

[Less] Lung cancers from 15 different mining groups were analyzed to determine what factors influence lung . . . [More] Lung cancers from 15 different mining groups were analyzed to determine what factors influence lung cancer rates. Data was obtained from the United States Public Health Service, and Swedish, Czechoslovakian, and Canadian mining groups. The roles of radiation, cigarette smoking, age, and height on resultant lung disease were explored in United States uranium (7440611) miners. The frequency of respiratory cancers increased with increasing exposure to radiation and to cigarette smoking. Short miners had the highest cancer rates. Supplemental data from other countries indicated that at low exposures or at low exposure rates, alpha radiation was more efficient in inducing lung cancer. Background concentrations of radon-220 (22481487) averaged 185 and 416 picoCuries per cubic meter for outdoors and indoors, respectively. Radon-222 (14859677) contributed 40 percent of the dose of radon-220. Most miners averaged about 75 percent of their time indoors. It was calculated that the average instantaneous exposure was 0.002 Working Level or 0.12 Working Level Months per year. (Working Level Month was defined as the exposure a worker would receive for 1 month at an average concentration of potential alpha energy per liter of air). Lung cancer rate for nonsmokers was calculated to be about 19 per 100,000 person years. The author concludes that information obtained from cancer rate and background radiation curves should be extrapolated upward from the lowest point on the curve instead of the usual downward extrapolation from high exposure.

Technical Report
Technical Report

American Uranium Miners And Lung Cancer

Authors: Archer, VE; Brown, MC (1900) HERO ID: 2949423

[Less] The incidence of lung cancer in uranium (7440611) miners was assessed. A study was conducted of 3,414 . . . [More] The incidence of lung cancer in uranium (7440611) miners was assessed. A study was conducted of 3,414 uranium miners over a 7 year period to determine death rate and deaths attributable to respiratory cancers. Cumulative radiation exposures of the miners were estimated in terms of working months and the concentrations of radon daughters. An intensive follow up program was instituted that maintained contact with 95 percent of the miners; for statistical purposes, the remainder were considered to be alive. Among the 3,414 miners, there were 398 deaths, compared with 251 deaths expected on the bases of rates for the male white population of the area. Of the 398 deaths, 62 were attributed to respiratory cancer, compared with an expected incidence of 10 deaths. Most deaths from respiratory cancer occurred 10 or more years after the first mining exposure. There was no excess for the first 5 years after the start of mining. There were significant excesses of respiratory cancers in six exposure classifications; for the first three categories, up to 840 working months, there was an excess of 300 to 400 percent. From 840 to 1,799 working months, the excess of respiratory cancer deaths was markedly progressive with increasing exposure. Miners who smoked had an excess of lung cancer 10 times greater than miners who did not smoke.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

RADIATION FROM URANIUM SALTS

(1896) Science 3:700-701. HERO ID: 1424542


Technical Report
Technical Report

Determination of actinides in urine and fecal samples

Author: Mckibbin, TT HERO ID: 1426486

[Less] A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample . . . [More] A method of determining the radioactivity of specific actinides that are carried in urine or fecal sample material is disclosed. The samples are ashed in a muffle furnace, dissolved in an acid, and then treated in a series of steps of reduction, oxidation, dissolution, and precipitation, including a unique step of passing a solution through a chloride form anion exchange resin for separation of uranium and plutonium from americium.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Waste treatment process for removal of contaminants from aqueous, mixed-waste solutions using sequential chemical treatment and crossflow microfiltration, followed by dewatering

Authors: Vijayan, S; Wong, CF; Buckley, LP HERO ID: 1426281

[Less] It is an object of the claimed invention to combine chemical treatment with microfiltration process . . . [More] It is an object of the claimed invention to combine chemical treatment with microfiltration process to treat groundwater, leachate from contaminated soil washing, surface and run-off waters contaminated with toxic metals, radionuclides and trace amounts of organics from variety of sources. The process can also be used to treat effluents from industrial processes such as discharges associated with smelting, mining and refining operations. Influent contaminants amenable to treatment are from a few mg/L to hundreds of mg/L. By selecting appropriate precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption agents and conditions, efficiencies greater than 99.9 percent can be achieved for removal of contaminants. The filtered water for discharge can be targeted with either an order of magnitude greater or lower than contaminant levels for drinking water.

Technical Report
Technical Report

ON THE OXIDE FUME FORMED BY THE COMBUSTION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM

Authors: Carter, RF; Stewart, K HERO ID: 1427580

Abstract: HEEP COPYRIGHT: BIOL ABS. ACCIDENT SITUATIONS