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Chromium VI

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16,635 References Were Found:

Journal Article
Journal Article

Preliminary Survey of Wood Preservative Production Facility at Koppers Company, Inc., Forest Products Group Specialty Wood Chemicals Division, Valparaiso, Indiana

Authors: Todd, AS; Timbie, CY HERO ID: 1516535

[Less] The Koppers Company, Incorporated, a chromated copper arsenate manufacturing facility (SIC-2851) in . . . [More] The Koppers Company, Incorporated, a chromated copper arsenate manufacturing facility (SIC-2851) in Valparaiso, Indiana was surveyed on July 24, 1979 to evaluate work practices, exposure controls, past exposures, and medical, industrial hygiene, and safety programs. The facility employs five workers. Two NIOSH sampling methods were used to measure arsenic (7440382), chromium (7440473), and copper (7440508) at two sites for 5 hours at each site. The company provided a comprehensive medical surveillance program, periodic air sampling and exhaust system maintenance, and mandatory protective clothing and showers. Airborne levels recorded were 19.0 and 135.2 micrograms per cubic meter (m3) for copper, 4.2 and 22.2 micrograms/m3 for total chromium, 1.1 and 15.2 micrograms/m3 for hexavalent chromium, and 4.2 and 24.2 micrograms/m3 for arsenic. The authors suggest that arsenic exposure exceeded the OSHA permissible exposure limit of 10 micrograms/m3 averaged over an 8 hour period. The OSHA permissible exposure limits of 1 milligram per cubic meter (mg/m3) averaged over an 8 hour period for copper dust and mists and 0.5 mg/m3 for chromic acid were not exceeded.

Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment: Seventh Volume

Authors: Little, E; Greenberg, B; Delonay, A HERO ID: 1577722


Journal Article
Journal Article

Regeneration of Whetlerite for Adsorbing Toxic Pollutants from Air

Author: Deitz, VR HERO ID: 1510044

[Less] Patent Application. nvention relates to a method of regenerating adsorbents for removing toxic pollutants . . . [More] Patent Application. nvention relates to a method of regenerating adsorbents for removing toxic pollutants from air. More specifically, it relates to a method of restoring the ability of metal oxide-impregnated activated carbon referred to as whetlerite to remove cyanogen chloride from air. Whetlerites are activated carbon-based composites impregnated with ammoniacal solutions of divalent copper and monovalent silver, with or without hexavalent chromium, in various concentrations. Optionally, triethylenediamine (TEDA) is added to prolong the service life of the absorbent and resist the adverse effects of humid environments. Whetlerites adsorb a wide variety of toxic air pollutants, in particular cyanogen chloride, cyanogen, and hydrogen cyanide.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HETA-94-0417-2505, Tennant Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Authors: Echt, A; Tepper, A; Topolski, S HERO ID: 1514469

[Less] In response to a request from employees at the Golden Valley facility of the Tennant Company (SIC-3589), . . . [More] In response to a request from employees at the Golden Valley facility of the Tennant Company (SIC-3589), Minneapolis, Minnesota, a health hazard evaluation was conducted. Concern had been expressed over indoor environmental quality in offices and exposure to welding fumes. The company manufactured floor sweepers, scrubbers, and scarifiers. Headaches, sneezing, burning eyes, fatigue, depression, and mood swings were reported among office workers. Overall, 58% of those surveyed had one or more symptoms that occurred at work one or more days a week. Exposures to welding fume and most metals were below the applicable evaluation criteria. Eight hour time weighted average welding fume concentrations ranged from 0.33 to 1.6mg/m3. Titanium-dioxide (13463677) was present in greater than trace amounts in two of five samples; NIOSH has recommended that titanium-dioxide exposures be reduced to the lowest feasible concentration. Total chromium (7440473) exposure ranged from 0.003 to 0.01mg/m3, indicating that potential exposures to hexavalent chromium among frame welders should be evaluated. Manganese exposures ranged from 0.083 to 0.27mg/m3. The authors conclude that exposures to titanium-dioxide, chromium, and manganese were a cause for concern. Although no apparent cause for symptoms in office workers was found, ventilation system deficiencies were present. The authors recommend specific measures to reduce exposures and improve working conditions.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Natural and man-made hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California—study progress as of May 2017, and a summative-scale approach to estimate background Cr(VI) concentrations

Authors: Izbicki, JA; Groover, K (Open-File Report 2018-1045). Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey. HERO ID: 5371878

[Less] This report describes (1) work done between January 2015 and May 2017 as part of the U.S. Geological . . . [More] This report describes (1) work done between January 2015 and May 2017 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), background study and (2) the summative-scale approach to be used to estimate the extent of anthropogenic (man-made) Cr(VI) and background Cr(VI) concentrations near the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) natural gas compressor station in Hinkley, California. Most of the field work for the study was completed by May 2017. The summative-scale approach and calculation of Cr(VI) background were not well-defined at the time the USGS proposal for the background Cr(VI) study was prepared but have since been refined as a result of data collected as part of this study. The proposed summative scale consists of multiple items, formulated as questions to be answered at each sampled well. Questions that compose the summative scale were developed to address geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical constraints on Cr(VI) within the study area. Each question requires a binary (yes or no) answer. A score of 1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data consistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI); a score of –1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data inconsistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI). The areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated from the summative-scale analyses will be compared with the areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated on the basis of numerical groundwater flow model results, along with particle-tracking analyses. On the basis of these combined results, background Cr(VI) values will be estimated for “Mojave-type” deposits, and other deposits, in different parts of the study area outside the summative-scale mapped extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI).