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Arsenic Susceptibility

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5,871 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Slow recovery from severe inorganic arsenic poisoning despite treatment with DMSA (2.3-dimercaptosuccinic acid)

Authors: Stenehjem, AE; Vahter, M; Nermell, B; Aasen, J; Lierhagen, S; Mørland, J; Jacobsen, D (2007) Clinical Toxicology 45:424-428. HERO ID: 1024663

[Less] A 39-year-old woman was hospitalized for nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and weakness of unknown etiology. . . . [More] A 39-year-old woman was hospitalized for nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and weakness of unknown etiology. Her condition progressively deteriorated and she developed multiple organ failure and tetraplegia. The diagnosis of inorganic arsenic poisoning was established by measurements of arsenic in urine and serum, showing 2,000 microg/L (normal < 10 microg/L) and 290 mug/Kg (normal < 2 microg/Kg), respectively. Hair arsenic was 57 mg/kg (normal < 0.2 mg/kg). Chelating therapy with 2.3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) 600 mg three times daily was given for a period of 45 days with three abruption periods during a total of 13 days. The clinical manifestations of arsenic toxicosis disappeared very slowly and five years after the hospitalization she still suffers from peripheral neuropathy. Although the use of DMSA was associated with increased urinary elimination of arsenic and a decrease in blood arsenic concentrations, DMSA treatment probably had no significant effect on the total body clearance in our patient. The source of the poisoning was never detected, nor the motivation behind it. Criminal intent was suspected, but no verdict was given.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mutual interaction between nutritional status and chronic arsenic toxicity due to groundwater contamination in an area of Terai, lowland Nepal

Authors: Maharjan, M; Watanabe, C; Ahmad, SA; Umezaki, M; Ohtsuka, R (2007) Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 61:389-394. HERO ID: 1025317

[Less] OBJECTIVE: To reveal the inter-relationship between nutritional status and arsenic . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: To reveal the inter-relationship between nutritional status and arsenic toxicity.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.

SETTING: A survey in an area of lowland Nepal, where a high prevalence of both skin manifestation and malnutrition was observed. Daily arsenic intake was estimated by measuring the arsenic concentration and daily consumption of the drinking water.

PARTICIPANTS: Adult villagers (248 men and 291 women). About half were classified as "underweight" (body mass index <18.5), indicating poor nutritional status.

MAIN RESULTS: Arsenic intake was negatively correlated with body mass index and substantially increased the prevalence of underweight individuals, among whom the prevalence of skin manifestations was 1.65-fold higher than normal weight individuals. When exposure level was considered, the prevalence of skin symptoms was consistently higher in the underweight than in the normal group. Although enhanced susceptibility in men was apparent by the increased prevalence of cutaneous symptoms, no sex difference was observed in the prevalence of underweight individuals related with exposure to arsenic.

CONCLUSIONS: The present data suggested that exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased prevalence of underweight, a serious health problem in developing countries, which in turn is associated with increased skin manifestation of arsenic poisoning.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Contamination status of arsenic and other trace elements in drinking water and residents from Tarkwa, a historic mining township in Ghana

Authors: Asante, KA; Agusa, T; Subramanian, A; Ansa-Asare, OD; Biney, CA; Tanabe, S (2007) Chemosphere 66:1513-1522. HERO ID: 1026670

[Less] This study was conducted to assess the contamination status of 22 trace elements, especially As in water . . . [More] This study was conducted to assess the contamination status of 22 trace elements, especially As in water and residents in Tarkwa, a historic mining town in Ghana. Drinking water and human urine samples were collected from Tarkwa in addition to control samples taken from Accra, the capital of Ghana in March, 2004. Concentrations of As and Mn in some drinking water samples from Tarkwa were found above the WHO drinking water guidelines posing a potential health risk for the people. A potential health risk of As and Mn is a concern for the people consuming the contaminated water in this area. No significant difference of As concentrations in human urine between mining town (Tarkwa) and control site (Accra) was observed. Although As concentrations in drinking water in Tarkwa were low, urinary As levels were comparable to those reported in highly As-affected areas in the world. These results suggest the presence of other sources of As contamination in Ghana. This is the first study on multi-elemental contamination in drinking water and human from a mining town in Ghana.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Dietary chromium and nickel enhance UV-carcinogenesis in skin of hairless mice

Authors: Uddin, AN; Burns, FJ; Rossman, TG; Chen, H; Kluz, T; Costa, M (2007) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 221:329-338. HERO ID: 1234247

[Less] The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1 . . . [More] The skin cancer enhancing effect of chromium (in male mice) and nickel in UVR-irradiated female Skh1 mice was investigated. The dietary vitamin E and selenomethionine were tested for prevention of chromium-enhanced skin carcinogenesis. The mice were exposed to UVR (1.0 kJ/m(2) 3 x weekly) for 26 weeks either alone, or combined with 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate, or with 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride in drinking water. Vitamin E or selenomethionine was added to the lab chow for 29 weeks beginning 3 weeks before the start of UVR exposure. Both chromium and nickel significantly increased the UVR-induced skin cancer yield in mice. In male Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.9+/-0.4 cancers/mouse, and 2.5 or 5.0 ppm potassium chromate added to drinking water increased the yields to 5.9+/-0.8 and 8.6+/-0.9 cancers/mouse, respectively. In female Skh1 mice, UVR alone induced 1.7+/-0.4 cancers/mouse, and the addition of 20, 100 or 500 ppm nickel chloride increased the yields to 2.8+/-0.9, 5.6+/-0.7 and 4.2+/-1.0 cancers/mouse, respectively. Neither vitamin E nor selenomethionine reduced the cancer yield enhancement by chromium. These results confirm that chromium and nickel, while not good skin carcinogens per se, are enhancers of UVR-induced skin cancers in Skh1 mice. Data also suggest that the enhancement of UVR-induced skin cancers by chromate may not be oxidatively mediated since the antioxidant vitamin E as well as selenomethionine, found to prevent arsenite-enhanced skin carcinogenesis, failed to suppress enhancement by chromate.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Hormesis and its place in nonmonotonic dose-response relationships: Some scientific reality checks

Author: Mushak, P (2007) Environmental Health Perspectives 115:500-506. HERO ID: 1247611

[Less] OBJECTIVE: This analysis is a critical assessment of current hormesis literature. I . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: This analysis is a critical assessment of current hormesis literature. I discuss definitions, characterization, generalizability, mechanisms, absence of empirical data specific for hormesis hypothesis testing, and arguments that hormesis be the "default assumption" in risk assessment.

DATA SOURCES: Hormesis, a biological phenomenon typically described as low-dose stimulation from substances producing higher-dose inhibition, has recently garnered interest in several quarters. The principal sources of published materials for this analysis are the writings of certain proponents of hormesis. Surprisingly few systematic critiques of current hormesis literature exist. Limits to the phenomenon's appropriate role in risk assessment and health policy have been published.

DATA SYNTHESIS: Serious gaps in scientific understanding remain: a stable definition; generalizability, especially for humans; a clear mechanistic basis; limitations in the presence of multiple toxic end points, target organs, and mechanisms. Absence of both arms-length, consensus-driven, scientific evaluations and empirical data from studies specifically designed for hormesis testing have limited its acceptance.

CONCLUSIONS: Definition, characterization, occurrence, and mechanistic rationale for hormesis will remain speculative, absent rigorous studies done specifically for hormesis testing. Any role for hormesis in current risk assessment and regulatory policies for toxics remains to be determined.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Carcinogenicity of Metal Compounds

Authors: Ke, Q; Costa, Max; Kazantzis, G (2007) 177-196. HERO ID: 1848350


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

Authors: Klein, CB; Leszczynska, J; Hickey, C; Rossman, TG (2007) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 222:289-297. HERO ID: 568984

[Less] Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and . . . [More] Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Population differences in the human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) gene polymorphism detected by using genotyping method

Authors: Fujihara, J; Kunito, T; Agusa, T; Yasuda, T; Iida, R; Fujii, Y; Takeshita, H (2007) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 225:251-254. HERO ID: 627167

[Less] Arsenic poisoning from drinking groundwater is a serious problem, particularly in developing Asian countries. . . . [More] Arsenic poisoning from drinking groundwater is a serious problem, particularly in developing Asian countries. Human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. Recently, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs; rs17885947, M287T (T860C)) in the AS3MT gene was shown to be related to enzyme activity and considered to be related to genetic susceptibility to arsenic. In the present study, a useful genotyping method for M287T was developed using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Applying this method, the genotype distribution of M287T in Ovambo (n=185), Turkish (n=191), Mongolian (n=233), Korean (n=200), and Japanese (n=370) populations were investigated. The mutation frequencies in Asian populations were relatively lower than those of African and Caucasian populations, including those from previous studies: the frequencies of mutation in the Mongolian, Korean, and Japanese populations were 0.040, 0.010, and 0.010, respectively. In the course of this study, a PCR-based genotyping method that is inexpensive and does not require specialized equipment was developed. This method could be applied to a large number of residents at risk for arsenic poisoning.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

Authors: Waalkes, MP; Liu, J; Diwan, BA (2007) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 222:271-280. HERO ID: 628457

[Less] Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show . . . [More] Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans and investigating a potential transplacental component of the human carcinogenic response to arsenic should be a research priority.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Polymorphisms in XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln) genes, sunburn and arsenic-related skin lesions

Authors: McCarty, KM; Smith, TJ; Zhou, W; Gonzalez, E; Quamruzzaman, Q; Rahman, M; Mahiuddin, G; Ryan, L; Su, L; Christiani, DC (2007) Carcinogenesis 28:1697-1702. HERO ID: 656693

[Less] BACKGROUND: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair capacity and ultraviolet . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair capacity and ultraviolet exposure have not been well investigated in relation to skin lesions associated with arsenic exposure. This population based case-control study, of 600 cases and 600 controls, frequency matched on age and gender in Pabna, Bangladesh, in 2001-2002, investigated the association and potential effect modification between polymorphisms in Xeroderma Pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (Lys751Gln and Asp312Asn) genes, tendency to sunburn and arsenic-related skin lesions. METHODS: Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULT: No significant association was observed between skin lesions and the XPD 312 Asp/Asn (adjusted OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.65-1.15) Asn/Asn (adjusted OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.50-1.15) (referent Asp/Asp); XPD 751 Lys/Gln (adjusted OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.69-1.23) Gln/Gln (adjusted OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.66-1.45) (referent Lys/Lys). While we did not observe any evidence of effect modification of these polymorphisms on the association between well arsenic concentration and skin lesions, we did observe effect modification between these polymorphisms and sunburn tendency and arsenic-related skin lesions. Individuals with the heterozygote or homozygote variant forms (Asp/Asn or Asn/Asn) had half the risk of skin lesions (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.29-0.68) compared with those with the wild-type XPDAsp312Asn genotype (Asp/Asp) and individuals with heterozygote or homozygote variant forms (Lys/Gln or Gln/Gln) had half the risk of skin lesions (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31-0.72) compared with those with the wild-type XPDLys751Gln genotype (Lys/Lys), within the least sensitive strata of sunburn severity. We observed effect modification on the multiplicative scale for XPD 751 and XPD 312. CONCLUSION: XPD polymorphisms modified the relationship between tendency to sunburn and skin lesions in an arsenic exposed population. Further study is necessary to explore the effect of XPD polymorphisms and sun exposure on risk of arsenic-related skin lesions.