Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


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14,191 References Were Found:

Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Air Pollution and Human Behavior

Authors: Evans, GW; Jacobs, SV (1982) In Evans, GW (Ed.), Environmental Stress (pp. 105-132). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. HERO ID: 179899


Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Atmospheric conditions, seasonal trends, and psychiatric emergencies

Authors: Rotton, J; Frey, J (1982) HERO ID: 190477


Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Behavioral responses to air pollution

Authors: Evans, GW; Jacobs, SV; Frager, NB (1982) In A Baum; J Singer (Eds.), Advances in Environmental Psychology (pp. 237-269). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. HERO ID: 190521


Journal Article
Journal Article

An Overview of Applied Visibility Fundamentals: Survey and Synthesis of Visibility Literature

Author: NOAA (1982) FCM-R3-1982. HERO ID: 3119958


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The extinction coefficient of multicomponent aerosols

Authors: Ouimette, JR; Flagan, RC (1982) Atmospheric Environment 16:2405-2420. HERO ID: 25047

[Less] #The general problem of visibility reduction by aerosols is explored in order to identify the conditions . . . [More] #The general problem of visibility reduction by aerosols is explored in order to identify the conditions necessary for determination of the roles of individual chemical species. The particle extinction coefficient depends on the distribution of chemical species with respect to particle size and from particle to particle within each size range. Single particle measurements of composition and optical properties would be required to determine directly the chemical species contributions to the extinction coefficient. Several special cases are identified which would allow exact calculations based on available data. The composition and optical properties of particles must be uniform within each size interval if composition distribution data are to be used. Corroborative data are necessary to ensure that important contributors are not neglected since many chemical species are not readily measured. Estimation of the species mass extinction efficiencies by statistical analysis of chemical data obtained from total filter samples also requires that the normalized species mass distribution be invariant. The results of two field studies of visibility reduction in arid regions of the southwestern United States are used to explore the validity of these assumptions. The two methods, estimation from size-composition distribution data and from total filter data, yield similar estimates of species contributions to the extinction coefficient.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Postnatal human lung growth

Author: Thurlbeck, WM (1982) Thorax 37:564-571. HERO ID: 93260

[Less] Standard morphometric methods were applied to the lungs of 36 boys and 20 girls aged from 6 weeks to . . . [More] Standard morphometric methods were applied to the lungs of 36 boys and 20 girls aged from 6 weeks to 14 years, dying as a result of trauma or after short illnesses. Individual lung units, alveolar dimensions, and number of alveoli per unit area and volume did not differ between boys and girls, but boys had bigger lungs than girls for the same stature. This resulted in a larger total number of alveoli and a larger aveolar surface area in boys than in girls for a given age and stature. There may be more respiratory bronchioles in boys than girls. There was rapid alveolar multiplication during the first two years of life and alveolar dimensions and number of alveoli per unit area and volume did not change much during this period. There was little or no increase in the total number of alveoli after the age of 2 years but the data are hard to interpret. There is a wide scatter of the total number of alveoli in the growing lung, in keeping with the observation that the total number of alveoli is very variable in adults. Prediction data are given for the various morphometric variables studied.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Breathing patterns influence aerosol deposition sites in excised dog lungs

Authors: Valberg, P; Brain, J; Sneddon, S; LeMott, S (1982) HERO ID: 190019


Technical Report
Technical Report

Air quality criteria for particulate matter and sulfur oxides (final, 1982)

Author: U.S. EPA (1982) (EPA 600/8-82-029aF-cF). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 17610

[Less] The document evaluates and assesses scientific information on the health and welfare effects associated . . . [More] The document evaluates and assesses scientific information on the health and welfare effects associated with exposure to various concentrations of sulfur oxides and particulate matter in ambient air. The literature through 1980-81 has been reviewed thoroughly for information relevant to air quality criteria, although the document is not intended as a complete and detailed review of all literature pertaining to sulfur oxides and particulate matter. An attempt has been made to identify the major discrepancies in our current knowledge and understanding of the effects of these pollutants. Although this document is principally concerned with the health and welfare effects of sulfur oxides and particulate matter, other scientific data are presented and evaluated in order to provide a better understanding of these pollutants in the environment. To this end, the document includes chapters that discuss the chemistry and physics of the pollutants; analytical techniques; sources; and types of emissions; environmental concentrations and exposure levels; atmospheric chemistry and dispersion modeling; acidic deposition; effects on vegetation; effects on visibility, climate, and materials; and respiratory, physiological, toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological aspects of human exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Determination of aerosol growth rates in the atmosphere using lumped mode aerosol dynamics

Author: Whitby, KT (1981) Journal of Aerosol Science 12:173-178. HERO ID: 3267641


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Ozone inhibition of tissue cholinesterase in guinea pigs

Authors: Gordon, T; Taylor, BF; Amdur, MO (1981) Archives of Environmental Health 36:284-288. HERO ID: 39363

[Less] This study sought to determine if ozone at levels known to induce bronchial hyperreactivity in guinea . . . [More] This study sought to determine if ozone at levels known to induce bronchial hyperreactivity in guinea pigs would inhibit tissue cholinesterase activity. Male, Hartley guinea pigs were exposed to filtered air, 0.1 ppm ozone, or 0.8 ppm ozone for 1 hr. Two hours after exposure, brain, lung, and diaphragm tissue samples were frozen for assay of cholinesterase activity. Brain cholinesterase activity was only minimally inhibited in either ozone exposure group. Both levels of ozone significantly inhibited lung cholinesterase activity compared to control animals' activity: a 17% decrease in activity in the 0.1 ppm ozone group (P less than .05) and a 16% decrease in the 0.8 ppm ozone group (P less than .05). Ozone at 0.8 ppm also inhibited activity in the diaphragm by 14% (P less than .02). To determine the degree of involvement of cholinesterase inhibition in bronchial hyperreactivity, parathion pretreated animals were challenged with histamine and the pulmonary function changes monitored. Parathion-treated animals had a peak resistance increase of 330 +/- 104% (mean +/- SE), while the control vehicle animals' increase was 165 +/- 48%. The differences were not statistically significant, but show that cholinesterase inhibition may contribute to ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity.