Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-PM (current)


14,179 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Associations between mortality and prolonged exposure to elevated particulate matter concentrations in East Asia

Authors: Kim, SE; Bell, ML; Hashizume, M; Honda, Y; Kan, H; Kim, H (2018) Environment International 110:88-94. HERO ID: 4165913

[Less] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter . . . [More] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <10μm (PM10) have considered only absolute concentrations of PM10 as a risk factor. However, none have evaluated the durational effect of multi-day periods with high PM10 concentrations. To evaluate the durational effect (i.e., number of days) of high PM10 concentrations on mortality, we collected data regarding 3,662,749 deaths from 28 cities in Japan, South Korea, and China (1993-2009). Exposure was defined as consecutive days with daily PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3. A Poisson model was used with duration as the variable of interest, while controlling for daily PM10 concentrations, meteorological variables, seasonal trends, and day of the week. The increase in mortality risk for each additional consecutive day with PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3 was 0.68% in Japan (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-1.01%), 0.48% in South Korea (95% CI: 0.30-0.66%), and 0.24% in China (95% CI: 0.14-0.33%). The annual average maximum number of consecutive days with high PM10 in Japan (2.40days), South Korea (6.96days), and China (42.26days) was associated with non-accidental death increases of 1.64% (95% CI: 1.31-1.98%), 3.37% (95% CI: 3.19-3.56%), and 10.43% (95% CI: 10.33-10.54%), respectively. These findings may facilitate the planning of public health interventions to minimize the health burden of air pollution.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of air pollution on infant and children respiratory mortality in four large Latin-American cities

Authors: Gouveia, N; Junger, WL; ESCALA investigators (2018) Environmental Pollution 232:385-391. HERO ID: 4166467

[Less] OBJECTIVES: Air pollution is an important public health concern especially for children . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: Air pollution is an important public health concern especially for children who are particularly susceptible. Latin America has a large children population, is highly urbanized and levels of pollution are substantially high, making the potential health impact of air pollution quite large. We evaluated the effect of air pollution on children respiratory mortality in four large urban centers: Mexico City, Santiago, Chile, and Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro in Brazil.

METHODS: Generalized Additive Models in Poisson regression was used to fit daily time-series of mortality due to respiratory diseases in infants and children, and levels of PM10 and O3. Single lag and constrained polynomial distributed lag models were explored. Analyses were carried out per cause for each age group and each city. Fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis was conducted in order to combine the city-specific results in a single summary estimate.

RESULTS: These cities host nearly 43 million people and pollution levels were above the WHO guidelines. For PM10 the percentage increase in risk of death due to respiratory diseases in infants in a fixed effect model was 0.47% (0.09-0.85). For respiratory deaths in children 1-5 years old, the increase in risk was 0.58% (0.08-1.08) while a higher effect was observed for lower respiratory infections (LRI) in children 1-14 years old [1.38% (0.91-1.85)]. For O3, the only summarized estimate statistically significant was for LRI in infants. Analysis by season showed effects of O3 in the warm season for respiratory diseases in infants, while negative effects were observed for respiratory and LRI deaths in children.

DISCUSSION: We provided comparable mortality impact estimates of air pollutants across these cities and age groups. This information is important because many public policies aimed at preventing the adverse effects of pollution on health consider children as the population group that deserves the highest protection.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Tackling the mortality from long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution in megacities: Lessons from the Greater Cairo case study

Authors: Wheida, A; Nasser, A; El Nazer, M; Borbon, A; Abo El Ata, GA; Abdel Wahab, M; Alfaro, SC (2018) Environmental Research 160:223-231. HERO ID: 4168542

[Less] OBJECTIVE: The poor outdoor air quality in megacities of the developing world and its . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: The poor outdoor air quality in megacities of the developing world and its impact on health is a matter of concern for both the local populations and the decision-makers. The objective of this work is to quantify the mortality attributable to long-term exposure to PM2.5, NO2, and O3 in Greater Cairo (Egypt).

METHODS: We analyze the temporal and spatial variability of the three pollutants concentrations measured at 18 stations of the area. Then, we apply the method recommended by the WHO to estimate the excess mortality. In this assessment, three different shapes (log-linear, linear, and log-log) of the concentration-response functions (CRF) are used.

RESULTS: With PM2.5 concentrations varying from 50 to more than 100µg/m3 in the different sectors of the megacity, the spatial variability of this pollutant is found to be one important cause of uncertainty on the excess mortality associated with it. Also important is the choice of the CRF. With the average (75µg/m3) PM2.5 concentration and the most favorable log-log shape of the CRF, 11% (CI, 9-14%) of the non-accidental mortality in the population older than 30 years can still be attributed to PM2.5, which corresponds to 12520 (CI, 10240-15930) yearly premature deaths. Should the Egyptian legal 70µg/m3 PM10 limit (corresponding to approximately 37.5µg/m3 for PM2.5) be met, this number would be reduced to 7970, meaning that 4550 premature deaths could be avoided each year. Except around some industrial or traffic hot spots, NO2 concentration is found to be below the 40µg/m3 air quality guideline of the WHO. However, the average concentration (34µg/m3) of this gas exceeds the stricter 10µg/m3 recommendation of the HRAPIE project and it is thus estimated that from 7850 to 10470 yearly deaths can be attributed to NO2. Finally, with the ozone concentration measured at one station only, it is found that, depending on the choice of the CRF, between 2.4% and 8.8% of the mortality due to respiratory diseases can be attributed to this gas.

CONCLUSION: In Greater Cairo, PM2.5 and NO2 constitute major health risks. The best estimate is that in the population older than 30 years, 11% and 8% of the non-accidental mortality can be attributed to these two pollutants, respectively.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Geospatial hot spot analysis of lung cancer patients correlated to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and industrial wind in Eastern Thailand

Authors: Zhang, H; Tripathi, NK (2018) HERO ID: 4165060

[Less] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and . . . [More] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and second among females in Thailand. Lung cancer is highly related to particulate matter (PM)-especially fine particulates with a diameter of 2.5 mu m or less (PM2.5). Recent studies have indicated a strong correlation between fine particulate matter (PM25) and lung function diseases. Therefore, this study aims to investigate and explore the phenomenon of lung cancer and its spatial correlation to mortality and PM2.5 in Eastern Thailand from 2008 to 2012 using multidisciplinary techniques. The cancer registry was utilized as data inventory and geographical information system (GIS), Global Moran's I, Getis-Ord G statistics, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) tool, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA), and ordinary least square (OLS) methods to generate the PM2.5 maps to create hot spots in Eastern Thailand. The results visualize and analyze lung cancer hot spots and are adjusted for known factors such as sex and age of lung cancer patients. Choropleth maps of lung cancer incidence and mortality rates, generated for the first time, revealed that the number of male cancer patients is higher than that of females in Eastern Thailand. Global autocorrelation demonstrated considerable spatial clustering of lung cancer incidence and mortality. 91.56% of the lung cancer patients belonged to the age group of above 50 in both sexes. Significant relationships were found between the PM2.5 variable and the spatial patterns of lung cancer incidence and mortality. The Chonburi and Chanthaburi provinces were found to be the major hot spots for lung cancer incidence, which are close to industrial areas. These findings are useful in identifying the cancer registry information globally as well as locally. This study also provides a useful set of tools to identify and create hot spots in the developing countries where data and resources are major limitations. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Socioeconomic position, population density and site-specific cancer mortality: A multilevel analysis of Belgian adults, 2001-2011

Authors: Hagedoorn, P; Vandenheede, H; Vanthomme, K; Gadeyne, S (2018) HERO ID: 4165308

[Less] Our study explores the association between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) . . . [More] Our study explores the association between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and all-cancer and site-specific cancer mortality. Data on all Belgian residents are retrieved from a population-based dataset constructed from the 2001 census linked to register data on emigration and mortality for 2001-2011. The study population contains all men and women aged 40 years or older during follow-up. Individual SEP is measured using education, employment status and housing conditions. Neighborhood SEP is measured by a deprivation index (in quintiles). Directly age-standardized mortality rates and multilevel Poisson models are used to estimate the association between individual SEP and neighborhood deprivation and mortality from all-cancer and cancer of the lung, colon and rectum, pancreas, prostate and female breast. The potential confounding role of population density is assessed using multilevel models as well. Our findings show an increase in mortality from all-cancer and site-specific cancer by decreasing level of individual SEP for both men and women. In addition, individuals living in highly deprived neighborhoods experience significantly higher mortality from all-cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and female colorectal cancer after controlling for individual SEP. Male colorectal and prostate cancer and female breast cancer are not associated with neighborhood deprivation. Population density acts as a confounder for female lung cancer only. Our study indicates that deprivation at both the individual and neighborhood level is associated with all-cancer mortality and mortality from several cancer sites. More research into the role of life-style related and clinical factors is necessary to gain more insight into causal pathway.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Lifetime exposure to ambient air pollution and methylation of tumor suppressor genes in breast tumors

Authors: Callahan, CL; Bonner, MR; Nie, J; Han, D; Wang, Y; Tao, MH; Shields, PG; Marian, C; Eng, KH; Trevisan, M; Beyea, J; Freudenheim, JL (2018) Environmental Research 161:418-424. HERO ID: 4166118

[Less] BACKGROUND: We previously reported increased risk of breast cancer associated with . . . [More] BACKGROUND: We previously reported increased risk of breast cancer associated with early life exposure to two measures of air pollution exposure, total suspended particulates (TSP) and traffic emissions (TE), possible proxies for exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure to PAHs has been shown to be associated with aberrant patterns of DNA methylation in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. Exposure to PAHs and methylation in breast tumor tissue has received little attention. We examined the association of early life exposure to TSP and TE with patterns of DNA methylation in breast tumors.

METHODS: We conducted a study of women enrolled in the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer (WEB) Study. Methylation of nine genes (SFN, SCGB3A1, RARB, GSTP1, CDKN2A CCND2, BRCA1, FHIT, and SYK) was assessed using bisulfite-based pyrosequencing. TSP exposure at each woman's home address at birth, menarche, and when she had her first child was estimated. TE exposure was modeled for each woman's residence at menarche, her first birth, and twenty and ten years prior to diagnosis. Unconditional logistic regression was employed to estimate odds ratios (OR) of having methylation greater than the median value, adjusting for age, secondhand smoke exposure before age 20, current smoking status, and estrogen receptor status.

RESULTS: Exposure to higher TSP at a woman's first birth was associated with lower methylation of SCGB3A1 (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.23-0.99) and higher methylation of SYK (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.03-3.35). TE at menarche was associated with increased methylation of SYK (OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.05-5.33). TE at first birth and ten years prior to diagnosis was associated with decreased methylation of CCND2 (OR ten years prior to diagnosis=0.48, 95% CI: 0.26-0.89). Although these associations were nominally significant, none were significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: We observed suggestive evidence that exposure to ambient air pollution throughout life, measured as TSP and TE, may be associated with DNA methylation of some tumor suppressor genes in breast tumor tissue. Future studies with a larger sample size that assess methylation of more sites are warranted.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Supplement: Disparities in Distribution of Particulate Matter Emission Sources by Race and Poverty Status

Authors: Mikati, I; Benson, AF; Luben, TJ; Sacks, JD; Richmond-Bryant, J (2018) American Journal of Public Health 1:e1-e6. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 4241047

[Less] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter (PM)-emitting facilities by the characteristics of the surrounding residential population and to illustrate various spatial scales at which to consider such disparities.

METHODS: We assigned facilities emitting PM in the 2011 National Emissions Inventory to nearby block groups across the 2009 to 2013 American Community Survey population. We calculated the burden from these emissions for racial/ethnic groups and by poverty status. We quantified disparities nationally and for each state and county in the country.

RESULTS: For PM of 2.5 micrometers in diameter or less, those in poverty had 1.35 times higher burden than did the overall population, and non-Whites had 1.28 times higher burden. Blacks, specifically, had 1.54 times higher burden than did the overall population. These patterns were relatively unaffected by sensitivity analyses, and disparities held not only nationally but within most states and counties as well.

CONCLUSIONS: Disparities in burden from PM-emitting facilities exist at multiple geographic scales. Disparities for Blacks are more pronounced than are disparities on the basis of poverty status. Strictly socioeconomic considerations may be insufficient to reduce PM burdens equitably across populations. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print February 22, 2018: e1-e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304297).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Applied concepts in PBPK modeling: How to extend an open systems pharmacology model to the special population of pregnant women

Authors: Dallmann, A; Solodenko, J; Ince, I; Eissing, T (2018) CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology 7:419-431. HERO ID: 4470799

[Less] This tutorial presents the workflow of adapting an adult physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) . . . [More] This tutorial presents the workflow of adapting an adult physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to the pregnant populations using the Open Systems Pharmacology (OSP) software suite (www.open-systems-pharmacology.org). This workflow is illustrated using a previously published PBPK model for metronidazole that is extrapolated to pregnancy by parameterizing and extending the model structure in terms of pregnancy-induced physiological changes. Importantly, this workflow can be applied to other scenarios where PBPK models need to be re-parameterized or structurally modified.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Fetal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: systems information on fetal biometry and gross composition

Authors: Abduljalil, K; Johnson, TN; Rostami-Hodjegan, A (2018) Clinical Pharmacokinetics 57:1149-1171. HERO ID: 4470812

[Less] BACKGROUND: Postulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics has been based on animal studies; . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Postulating fetal exposure to xenobiotics has been based on animal studies; however, inter-species differences can make this problematic. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models may capture the rapid changes in anatomical, biochemical, and physiological parameters during fetal growth over the duration of pregnancy and help with interpreting laboratory animal data. However, these models require robust information on the longitudinal variations of system parameter values and their covariates.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present an extensive analysis and integration of the available biometric data required for creating a virtual human fetal population by means of equations that define the changes of each parameter with gestational age.

METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was carried out on the parameters defining the growth of a fetus during in-utero life including weight, height, and body surface area in addition to other indices of fetal size, body fat, and water. Collated data were assessed and integrated through a meta-analysis to develop mathematical algorithms to describe growth with fetal age.

RESULTS: Data for the meta-analysis were obtained from 97 publications, of these, 15 were related to fetal height or length, 32 to fetal weight, 4 to fetal body surface area, 8 to crown length, 5 to abdominal circumference, 12 to head circumference, 14 to body fat, and 12 to body water. Various mathematical algorithms were needed to describe parameter values from the time of conception to birth.

CONCLUSION: The collated data presented in this article enabled the development of mathematical functions to describe fetal biometry and provide a potentially useful resource for building anthropometric features of fetal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Development of growth equations from longitudinal studies of body weight and height in the full term and preterm neonate: From birth to four years postnatal age

Authors: Troutman, JA; Sullivan, MC; Carr, GJ; Fisher, J (2018) HERO ID: 4471076

[Less] Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are developed from compound-independent information . . . [More] Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are developed from compound-independent information to describe important anatomical and physiological characteristics of an individual or population of interest. Modeling pediatric populations is challenging because of the rapid changes that occur during growth, particularly in the first few weeks and months after birth. Neonates who are born premature pose several unique challenges in PBPK model development. To provide appropriate descriptions for body weight (BW) and height (Ht) for age and appropriate incremental gains in PBPK models of the developing preterm and full term neonate, anthropometric measurements collected longitudinally from 1,063 preterm and 158 full term neonates were combined with 2,872 cross-sectional measurements obtained from the NHANES 2007-2010 survey. Age-specific polynomial growth equations for BW and Ht were created for male and female neonates with corresponding gestational birth ages of 25, 28, 31, 34, and 40 weeks. Model-predicted weights at birth were within 20% of published fetal/neonatal reference standards. In comparison to full term neonates, postnatal gains in BW and Ht were slower in preterm subgroups, particularly in those born at earlier gestational ages. Catch up growth for BW in neonates born at 25, 28, 31, and 34 weeks gestational age was complete by 13, 8, 6, and 2 months of life (males) and by 10, 6, 5, and 2 months of life (females), respectively. The polynomial growth equations reported in this paper represent extrauterine growth in full term and preterm neonates and differ from the intrauterine growth standards that were developed for the healthy unborn fetus.