Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-PM (current)


14,004 References Were Found:

Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 10 (cancer) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4417285


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 11 (mortality) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4442366


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The development of a pregnancy PBPK Model for Bisphenol A and its evaluation with the available biomonitoring data

Authors: Sharma, RP; Schuhmacher, M; Kumar, V (2018) Science of the Total Environment 624:55-68. HERO ID: 4471201

[Less] Recent studies suggest universal fetal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and its association with the adverse . . . [More] Recent studies suggest universal fetal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and its association with the adverse birth outcomes. Estimation of the fetal plasma BPA concentration from the maternal plasma BPA would be highly useful to predict its associated risk to this specific population. The objective of current work is to develop a pregnancy-physiologically based pharmacokinetic (P-PBPK) model to predict the toxicokinetic profile of BPA in the fetus during gestational growth, and to evaluate the developed model using biomonitoring data obtained from different pregnancy cohort studies. To achieve this objective, first, the adult PBPK model was developed and validated with the human BPA toxicokinetic data. This validated human PBPK model was extended to develop a P-PBPK model, which included the physiological changes during pregnancy and the fetus sub-model. The developed model would be able to predict the BPA pharmacokinetics (PKs) in both mother and fetus. Transplacental BPA kinetics parameters for this study were taken from the previous pregnant mice study. Both oral and dermal exposure routes were included into the model to simulate total BPA internal exposure. The impact of conjugation and deconjugation of the BPA and its metabolites on fetal PKs was investigated. The developed P-PBPK model was evaluated against the observed BPA concentrations in cord blood, fetus liver and amniotic fluid considering maternal blood concentration as an exposure source. A range of maternal exposure dose for the oral and dermal routes was estimated, so that simulation concentration matched the observed highest and lowest mother plasma concentration in different cohorts' studies. The developed model could be used to address the concerns regarding possible adverse health effects in the fetus being exposed to BPA and might be useful in identifying critical windows of exposure during pregnancy.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Probe and monitoring path siting criteria for ambient air quality monitoring

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) § 40 CFR Part 58, Appendix 58, 2018 (Goverment Publishing Office). HERO ID: 4445192

[Less] (a) This appendix contains specific location criteria applicable to SLAMS, NCore, and PAMS ambient air . . . [More] (a) This appendix contains specific location criteria applicable to SLAMS, NCore, and PAMS ambient air quality monitoring probes, inlets, and optical paths after the general location has been selected based on the monitoring objectives and spatial scale of representation discussed in appendix D to this part. Adherence to these siting criteria is necessary to ensure the uniform collection of compatible and comparable air quality data.

(b) The probe and monitoring path siting criteria discussed in this appendix must be followed to the maximum extent possible. It is recognized that there may be situations where some deviation from the siting criteria may be necessary. In any such case, the reasons must be thoroughly documented in a written request for a waiver that describes how and why the proposed siting deviates from the criteria. This documentation should help to avoid later questions about the validity of the resulting monitoring data. Conditions under which the EPA would consider an application for waiver from these siting criteria are discussed in section 10 of this appendix.

(c) The pollutant-specific probe and monitoring path siting criteria generally apply to all spatial scales except where noted otherwise. Specific siting criteria that are phrased with a “must” are defined as requirements and exceptions must be approved through the waiver provisions. However, siting criteria that are phrased with a “should” are defined as goals to meet for consistency but are not requirements.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Pilot study on coarse PM monitoring

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4445486

[Less] The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted this field study in 2010 and 2011 to evaluate . . . [More] The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted this field study in 2010 and 2011 to evaluate the challenges in sampling and analyzing coarse aerosol, the precision of coarse PM (PMc) mass species measurements using dichotomous (dichot) samplers, and mass balance of PMc. The study database is publicly available through the EPA Air Quality System (AQS) to EPA personnel, atmospheric scientists, and others concerned with the science of PM air pollution, related health effects, and human exposure to the coarse PM fraction of particulate matter. Additional samplers—including paired PM10 and PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) samplers to calculate PM10-2.5 mass and species concentrations by the difference method, and semi-continuous monitors—were operated to further characterize coarse PM and aid in the interpretation of any differences between dichot data and difference method data. The results of this study may be used to establish routine field operating procedures and laboratory standard operating procedures (SOPs) for use in PMc speciation monitoring.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Geospatial hot spot analysis of lung cancer patients correlated to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and industrial wind in Eastern Thailand

Authors: Zhang, H; Tripathi, NK (2018) HERO ID: 4165060

[Less] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and . . . [More] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and second among females in Thailand. Lung cancer is highly related to particulate matter (PM)-especially fine particulates with a diameter of 2.5 mu m or less (PM2.5). Recent studies have indicated a strong correlation between fine particulate matter (PM25) and lung function diseases. Therefore, this study aims to investigate and explore the phenomenon of lung cancer and its spatial correlation to mortality and PM2.5 in Eastern Thailand from 2008 to 2012 using multidisciplinary techniques. The cancer registry was utilized as data inventory and geographical information system (GIS), Global Moran's I, Getis-Ord G statistics, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) tool, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA), and ordinary least square (OLS) methods to generate the PM2.5 maps to create hot spots in Eastern Thailand. The results visualize and analyze lung cancer hot spots and are adjusted for known factors such as sex and age of lung cancer patients. Choropleth maps of lung cancer incidence and mortality rates, generated for the first time, revealed that the number of male cancer patients is higher than that of females in Eastern Thailand. Global autocorrelation demonstrated considerable spatial clustering of lung cancer incidence and mortality. 91.56% of the lung cancer patients belonged to the age group of above 50 in both sexes. Significant relationships were found between the PM2.5 variable and the spatial patterns of lung cancer incidence and mortality. The Chonburi and Chanthaburi provinces were found to be the major hot spots for lung cancer incidence, which are close to industrial areas. These findings are useful in identifying the cancer registry information globally as well as locally. This study also provides a useful set of tools to identify and create hot spots in the developing countries where data and resources are major limitations. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Socioeconomic position, population density and site-specific cancer mortality: A multilevel analysis of Belgian adults, 2001-2011

Authors: Hagedoorn, P; Vandenheede, H; Vanthomme, K; Gadeyne, S (2018) HERO ID: 4165308

[Less] Our study explores the association between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) . . . [More] Our study explores the association between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) and all-cancer and site-specific cancer mortality. Data on all Belgian residents are retrieved from a population-based dataset constructed from the 2001 census linked to register data on emigration and mortality for 2001-2011. The study population contains all men and women aged 40 years or older during follow-up. Individual SEP is measured using education, employment status and housing conditions. Neighborhood SEP is measured by a deprivation index (in quintiles). Directly age-standardized mortality rates and multilevel Poisson models are used to estimate the association between individual SEP and neighborhood deprivation and mortality from all-cancer and cancer of the lung, colon and rectum, pancreas, prostate and female breast. The potential confounding role of population density is assessed using multilevel models as well. Our findings show an increase in mortality from all-cancer and site-specific cancer by decreasing level of individual SEP for both men and women. In addition, individuals living in highly deprived neighborhoods experience significantly higher mortality from all-cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and female colorectal cancer after controlling for individual SEP. Male colorectal and prostate cancer and female breast cancer are not associated with neighborhood deprivation. Population density acts as a confounder for female lung cancer only. Our study indicates that deprivation at both the individual and neighborhood level is associated with all-cancer mortality and mortality from several cancer sites. More research into the role of life-style related and clinical factors is necessary to gain more insight into causal pathway.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inhalation of fine particulate matter impairs endothelial progenitor cell function via pulmonary oxidative stress

Authors: Haberzettl, P; Conklin, DJ; Abplanalp, WT; Bhatnagar, A; O'Toole, TE (2018) Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 38:131-142. HERO ID: 4165772

[Less] OBJECTIVE: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution is associated . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution is associated with the depletion of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), as well as vascular injury and dysfunction. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether PM2.5 exposure leads to significant impairments in EPC function. Hence, we studied the effects of PM2.5 on EPC-mediated recovery of vascular perfusion after hindlimb ischemia and examined the mechanisms whereby PM2.5 exposure affects EPC abundance and function.

APPROACH AND RESULTS: In comparison with EPCs isolated from mice breathing filtered air, EPCs from mice exposed for 9 consecutive days (6 hours per day) to concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) had defects in both proliferation and tube formation. However, CAP exposure of mice overexpressing extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD-Tg) in the lungs did not affect EPC tube formation. Exposure to CAP also suppressed circulating EPC levels, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)-stimulated aortic Akt phosphorylation, and plasma NO levels in wild-type but not in ecSOD-Tg mice. EPCs from CAP-exposed wild-type mice failed to augment basal recovery of hindlimb perfusion when injected into unexposed mice subjected to hindlimb ischemia; however, these deficits in recovery of hindlimb perfusion were absent when using EPCs derived from CAP-exposed ecSOD-Tg mice. The improved reparative function of EPCs from CAP-exposed ecSOD-Tg mice was also reflected by greater expression of Mmp-9 and Nos3 when compared with EPCs from CAP-exposed wild-type mice.

CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to PM2.5 impairs EPC abundance and function and prevents EPC-mediated vascular recovery after hindlimb ischemia. This defect is attributed, in part, to pulmonary oxidative stress and was associated with vascular VEGF resistance and a decrement in NO bioavailability.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Fine particulate matters: The impact of air quality standards on cardiovascular mortality

Authors: Corrigan, AE; Becker, MM; Neas, LM; Cascio, WE; Rappold, AG (2018) HERO ID: 4165868

[Less] BACKGROUND: In 1997 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set the first annual National . . . [More] BACKGROUND: In 1997 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set the first annual National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Although the weight of scientific evidence has determined that a causal relationship exists between PM2.5 exposures and cardiovascular effects, few studies have concluded whether NAAQS-related reductions in PM2.5 led to improvements in public health.

METHODS: We examined the change in cardiovascular (CV) mortality rate and the association between change in PM2.5 and change in CV-mortality rate before (2000-2004) and after implementation of the 1997 annual PM2.5 NAAQS (2005-2010) among U.S. counties. We further examined how the association varied with respect to two factors related to NAAQS compliance: attainment status and design values (DV). We used difference-in-differences and linear regression models, adjusted for sociodemographic confounders.

FINDINGS: Across 619 counties, there were 1.10 (95% CI: 0.37, 1.82) fewer CV-deaths per year per 100,000 people for each 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5. Nonattainment counties had a twofold larger reduction in mean annual PM2.5, 2.1µg/m3, compared to attainment counties, 0.97µg/m3. CV-mortality rate decreased by 0.59 (95% CI: -0.54, 1.71) in nonattainment and 1.96 (95% CI: 0.77, 3.15) deaths per 100,000 people for each 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5 in attainment counties. When stratifying counties by DV, results were similar: counties with DV greater than 15µg/m3 experienced the greatest decrease in mean annual PM2.5 (2.29µg/m3) but the smallest decrease in CV-mortality rate per unit decrease in PM2.5, 0.73 (95% CI: -0.57, 2.02).

INTERPRETATION: We report a significant association between the change in PM2.5 and the change in CV-mortality rate before and after the implementation of NAAQS and note that the health benefits per 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5 persist at levels below the current national standard.

FUNDING: US EPA intermural research.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Associations between mortality and prolonged exposure to elevated particulate matter concentrations in East Asia

Authors: Kim, SE; Bell, ML; Hashizume, M; Honda, Y; Kan, H; Kim, H (2018) Environment International 110:88-94. HERO ID: 4165913

[Less] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter . . . [More] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <10μm (PM10) have considered only absolute concentrations of PM10 as a risk factor. However, none have evaluated the durational effect of multi-day periods with high PM10 concentrations. To evaluate the durational effect (i.e., number of days) of high PM10 concentrations on mortality, we collected data regarding 3,662,749 deaths from 28 cities in Japan, South Korea, and China (1993-2009). Exposure was defined as consecutive days with daily PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3. A Poisson model was used with duration as the variable of interest, while controlling for daily PM10 concentrations, meteorological variables, seasonal trends, and day of the week. The increase in mortality risk for each additional consecutive day with PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3 was 0.68% in Japan (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-1.01%), 0.48% in South Korea (95% CI: 0.30-0.66%), and 0.24% in China (95% CI: 0.14-0.33%). The annual average maximum number of consecutive days with high PM10 in Japan (2.40days), South Korea (6.96days), and China (42.26days) was associated with non-accidental death increases of 1.64% (95% CI: 1.31-1.98%), 3.37% (95% CI: 3.19-3.56%), and 10.43% (95% CI: 10.33-10.54%), respectively. These findings may facilitate the planning of public health interventions to minimize the health burden of air pollution.