Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


FtS 8:2 (39108-34-4)


24 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Bioconcentration of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss)

Authors: Yeung, LW; Mabury, SA (2013) Environmental Science and Technology 47:12505-12513. HERO ID: 2851296

[Less] This work investigated the bioconcentration of PFASs in juvenile rainbow trout by exposing the fish . . . [More] This work investigated the bioconcentration of PFASs in juvenile rainbow trout by exposing the fish in separate tanks under flow-through conditions to water continuously spiked with either of the AFFFs FC-203CF light water AFFF 3% (3M) or Niagara 1-3 (Angus Fire); a nonspiked tank served as the control. Three fish in each tank were collected after 1, 3, 6, and 11 days of exposure, and 3, 7, 14, and 25 days of depuration. Liver and carcass homogenate samples were analyzed for 20 PFASs using LC-MS/MS. PFDS, PFOS, PFHxS, and EtFOSAA were detected in fish exposed to the 3M foam, while 6:2 and 8:2 FTSASs, 6:2 and 8:2 FTSAs, 5:3 and 7:3 FTCAs were measured in fish exposed to Angus Fire foam. Bioconcentration factors and rate constants for uptake and depuration were calculated. Total and extractable organofluorine were measured in the fish samples. After fish were exposed to AFFFs, not only known PFASs but also other unknown organofluorines were bioconcentrated. Compared to the control group, significantly greater amounts (at least 10-fold) and proportion of unidentified PFASs were found in both liver and carcass homogenate ranging from ∼50% in 3M foam up to 95% in the Angus Fire foam at the end of exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Detections of Commercial Fluorosurfactants in Hong Kong Marine Environment and Human Blood: A Pilot Study

Authors: Loi, EIH; Yeung, LWY; Mabury, SA; Lam, PKS (2013) Environmental Science and Technology 47:4677-4685. HERO ID: 3353947

[Less] Previously, much of the perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) research has focused on . . . [More] Previously, much of the perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) research has focused on perfluoroallcyl carboxylates (PFCAs) or perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs). Recent studies indicate that known PFCAs and PFSAs accounted for 5-95% of the organofluorine (OF) in human and wild rat blood samples suggesting that a relatively large proportion of OF remained unknown. Until recently, some studies reported commercially available compounds such as polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (diPAPs) and fluorotelomer sulfonates (FTSAs) in human blood and sludge samples. The present investigation is a pilot study aiming at surveying some newly identified PFASs such as diPAPs, FTSAs, and perfluorinated phosphinates (PFPiAs) in different environmental samples including surface water, sediment, sewage treatment plant influent and effluent, sludge, benthic worm, and human blood from Hong Kong. DiPAPs (6:2, 6:2/8:2, and 8:2) were detected in some of the samples at part-per-billion (ppb) levels in sludge, sub ppb levels in influent and effluent, sediment, worm, and human blood samples, and sub part-per-trillion (ppt) levels in surface waters. Sub ppt to ppb levels of 6:2 and 8:2 FTSAs were observed in worm, surface water, and human blood samples. PFPiAs were only observed in worm samples. The detected "new PFASs" accounted for a minor proportion (less than 5%) of the total PFASs in benthic worm and human blood, but up to 95% in sewage sludge samples from Hong Kong. This is the first report of commercial fluorosurfactants (PFPiAs, diPAPs, and FTSAs) in the samples from the environment and human blood in Hong Kong; further information on the distribution, fate, and transport of "new PFASs" in other Asian cities, as well as toxicity, is needed for further assessing the human exposure and risk.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Aerobic soil biodegradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer stearate monoester

Authors: Dasu, K; Liu, J; Lee, LS (2012) Environmental Science and Technology 46:3831-3836. HERO ID: 1311549

[Less] A laboratory investigation on the biotransformation of 8:2 fluorotelomer stearate monoester (8:2 FTS) . . . [More] A laboratory investigation on the biotransformation of 8:2 fluorotelomer stearate monoester (8:2 FTS) in aerobic soils was conducted by monitoring the loss of 8:2 FTS, production of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (8:2 FTOH) and stearic acid, which would be released by cleavage of the ester linkage, and subsequent degradation products from FTOH for 80 d. Soil microcosms were extracted with ethyl acetate followed by two heated 90/10 v/v acetonitrile/200 mM NaOH extractions. 8:2 FTS was degraded with an observed half-life (t(1/2)) of 10.3 d. The rate of 8:2 FTS biotransformation substantially decreased after 20 d with 22% of 8:2 FTS still remaining on day 80. No biotransformation of 8:2 FTS occurred in autoclaved soil controls, which remained sterile with 102 ± 6% recovery, through day 20. 8:2 FTOH was generated with cleavage of the ester linkage of 8:2 FTS followed by a rapid decline (t(1/2) ~ 2 d) due to subsequent biodegradation. All the expected 8:2 FTOH degradation products were detected including 8:2 fluorotelomer unsaturated and saturated carboxylic acids, 7:2s FTOH, 7:3 acid, and three perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids with the most prominent being perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFOA consistently increased over time reaching 1.7 ± 0.07 mol % by day 80. Although cleavage of the ester linkage was evidenced by 8:2 FTOH production, an associated trend in stearic acid concentrations was not clear because of complex fatty acid metabolism dynamics in soil. Further analysis of mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns and chromatography supported the conclusion that hydrolysis of the ester linkage is predominantly the first step in the degradation of 8:2 FTS with the ultimate formation of terminal products such as PFOA.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Determination of polyfluoroalkyl compounds in water and suspended particulate matter in the river Elbe and North Sea, Germany

Authors: Ahrens, L; Plassmann, M; Xie, Z; Ebinghaus, R (2009) Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering in China 3:152-170. HERO ID: 2325318

[Less] The distribution of polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in the dissolved and particulate phase and their . . . [More] The distribution of polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in the dissolved and particulate phase and their discharge from the river Elbe into the North Sea were studied. The PFCs quantified included C4-C8 perfluorinated sulfonates (PFSAs), 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate (6:2 FTS), C6 and C8 perfluorinated sulfinates (PFSiAs), C4-C12 perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluoro-3,7-dimethyl-octanoic acid (3,7m2-PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA), and n-ethyl perfluroctane sulfonamidoethanol (EtFOSE). PFCs were mostly distributed in the dissolved phase, where perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) dominated with 2.9--12.5 ng/L. In the suspended particulate matter FOSA and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) showed the highest concentrations (4.0 ng/L and 2.3 ng/L, respectively). The total flux of capital sigma PFCs from the river Elbe was estimated to be 802 kg/year for the dissolved phase and 152 kg/year for the particulate phase. This indicates that the river Elbe acts as a source of PFCs into the North Sea. However, the concentrations of perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) and perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) in the North Sea were higher than that in the river Elbe, thus an alternative source must exist for these compounds.