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PFHxS (355-46-4)


825 References Were Found:

Journal Article
Journal Article

Mouse Models for Atherosclerosis Research-Which Is My Line?

Authors: Oppi, S; Lüscher, TF; Stein, S (2019) Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine 6:46. [Review] HERO ID: 5926372

[Less] Atherosclerosis is one of the primary causes of cardiovascular disease and mortality. This chronic immunometabolic . . . [More] Atherosclerosis is one of the primary causes of cardiovascular disease and mortality. This chronic immunometabolic disease evolves during decades in humans and encompasses different organs and immune cell types, as well as local and systemic processes that promote the progression of the disease. The most frequently used animal model to study these atherogenic processes and inter-organ crosstalk in a short time frame are genetically modified mouse models. Some models have been used throughout the last decades, and some others been developed recently. These models have important differences in cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism, reverse cholesterol transport pathway, obesity and diabetes as well as inflammatory processes. Therefore, the disease develops and progresses differently in the various mouse models. Since atherosclerosis is a multifaceted disease and many processes contribute to its progression, the choice of the right mouse model is important to study specific aspects of the disease. We will describe the different mouse models and provide a roadmap to facilitate current and future atherosclerosis researchers to choose the right model depending on their scientific question.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Exposure to environmental pollutants and their association with biomarkers of aging: A multipollutant approach

Authors: Vriens, A; Nawrot, TS; Janssen, BG; Baeyens, W; Bruckers, L; Covaci, A; De Craemer, S; De Henauw, S; Den Hond, E; Loots, I; Nelen, V; Schettgen, T; Schoeters, G; Martens, DS; Plusquin, M (2019) Environmental Science and Technology 53:5966-5976. HERO ID: 5097913

[Less] Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and telomere length are putative aging biomarkers and are sensitive . . . [More] Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and telomere length are putative aging biomarkers and are sensitive to environmental stressors, including pollutants. Our objective was to identify, from a set of environmental exposures, which exposure is associated with leukocyte mtDNA content and telomere length in adults. This study includes 175 adults from 50 to 65 years old from the cross-sectional Flemish Environment and Health study, of whom leukocyte telomere length and mtDNA content were determined using qPCR. The levels of exposure of seven metals, 11 organohalogens, and four perfluorinated compounds (PFHxS, PFNA, PFOA, PFOS) were measured. We performed sparse partial least-squares regression analyses followed by ordinary least-squares regression to assess the multipollutant associations. While accounting for possible confounders and coexposures, we identified that urinary cadmium (6.52%, 95% confidence interval, 1.06, 12.28), serum hexachlorobenzene (2.89%, 018, 5.68), and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (11.38%, 5.97, 17.08) exposure were positively associated ( p < 0.05) with mtDNA content, while urinary copper (-9.88%, -14.82, -4.66) and serum perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (-4.75%, -8.79, -0.54) exposure were inversely associated with mtDNA content. Urinary antimony (2.69%, 0.45, 4.99) and mercury (1.91%, 0.42, 3.43) exposure were positively associated with leukocyte telomere length, while urinary copper (-3.52%, -6.60, -0.34) and serum perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (-3.64%, -6.60, -0.60) showed an inverse association. Our findings support the hypothesis that environmental pollutants interact with molecular hallmarks of aging.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Decreased plasma levels of perfluoroalkylated substances one year after bariatric surgery

Authors: Jansen, A; Müller, MHB; Grønnestad, R; Klungsøyr, O; Polder, A; Skjerve, E; Aaseth, J; Lyche, JL (2019) Science of the Total Environment 657:863-870. HERO ID: 5081174

[Less] Per- and polyfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) are classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), . . . [More] Per- and polyfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) are classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and known to be protein bound. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of 17 different PFASs before and one year after bariatric surgery, and to assess whether weight loss and changed serum protein concentrations could be influencing factors. Plasma samples from 63 patients were analyzed for nine perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), three perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), and five perfluoroalkyl sulfonamide based substances (PASF) before and after surgery. Protein determination was performed in the corresponding serum samples. Mean weight loss one year after surgery was 32.1 kg. The plasma levels of all PFASs decreased with 4-34% compared to preoperative values, and included perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), which have been identified with increasing levels in the general population during recent years. Serum protein concentrations also decreased with 7-8%. Although protein levels were positively correlated with PFOA, PFBS, PFHxS and PFOS, regression analysis revealed that neither weight loss nor reductions in concentrations of serum protein could explain the decreased PFAS levels. The type of surgical procedure did not influence the changes of PFAS levels between the two sample points. A reduced food intake and alterations in absorptions of nutrients after bariatric surgery may have influenced the observed decreasing plasma levels of PFASs.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Breakdown Products from Perfluorinated Alkyl Substances (PFAS) Degradation in a Plasma-Based Water Treatment Process

Authors: Singh, RK; Fernando, S; Baygi, SF; Multari, N; Thagard, SM; Holsen, TM (2019) Environmental Science and Technology 53:2731-2738. HERO ID: 5080314

[Less] Byproducts produced when treating perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) . . . [More] Byproducts produced when treating perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in water using a plasma treatment process intentionally operated to treat these compounds slowly to allow for byproduct accumulation were quantified. Several linear chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) (C4 to C7) were identified as byproducts of both PFOA and PFOS treatment. PFOA, perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS) were also found to be byproducts from PFOS degradation. Significant concentrations of fluoride ions, inorganic carbon, and smaller organic acids (trifluoroacetic acid, acetic acid, and formic acid) were also identified. In addition to PFCAs, PFHxS, and PFBS, trace amounts of 43 PFOA-related and 35 PFOS-related byproducts were also identified using a screening and search-based algorithm. Minor concentrations of gas-phase byproducts were also identified (<2.5% of the F originally associated with the parent molecules) some of which are reported for the first time in perfluoroalkyl substance degradation experiments including cyclic perfluoroalkanes (C4F8, C5F10, C6F12, C7F14, and C8F16). The short chain PFCAs detected suggest the occurrence of a stepwise reduction of the parent perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) molecule, followed by oxidation of intermediates, perfluoroalkyl radicals, and perfluoro alcohols/ketones. Using a fluorine mass balance, 77% of the fluorine associated with the parent PFOA and 58% of the fluorine associated with the parent PFOS were identified. The bulk of the remaining fluorine was determined to be sorbed to reactor walls and tubing using sorption experiments in which plasma was not generated.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Dynamics of associations between perfluoroalkyl substances and uric acid across the various stages of glomerular function

Authors: Jain, RB; Ducatman, A (2019) Environmental Science and Pollution Research 26:12425-12434. HERO ID: 5080378

[Less] National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2014 data (N = 6844) for adults aged ≥ 20 years . . . [More] National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2014 data (N = 6844) for adults aged ≥ 20 years were analyzed to estimate associations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), namely, PFOA, PFOS, PFDA, PFHxS, and PFNA with uric acid across stages of declining glomerular function. The population was stratified by the estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) stages accompanying kidney disease: GF-1 with eGFR > 90 mL/min/1.73 m2; GF-2 with eGFR 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2; GF-3A with eGFR 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m2; and GF-3B/4 with eGFR 15-44 mL/min/1.73 m2. Adjusted and unadjusted geometric means of uric acid increased from GF-1 to GF-3B/4 for males and females. Adjusted geometric means for uric acid were higher for males by 1.38, 1.03, and 0.62 mg/dL for GF-1, GF2, and GF-3 respectively but for GF-3B/4, females had higher adjusted geometric means than males by 0.16 mg/dL, revealing narrowing of sex differences in uric acid as glomerular function declines. The direction of association between PFAS and uric acid was positive for GF-1 and GF-2 for males and for every PFAS except PFDA for females. For males for GF-3B/4, association between every PFAS except PFHxS and uric acid was found to be negative (p < 0.01). For females, only PFHxS actually reverses its relationship with increasing stages of renal disease. Uric acid associations with PFAS reverse in males with advanced renal failure. An implication is that previously reported association of PFAS exposure with uric acid is not due to renal failure. Understanding of other biomarkers associated with both PFAS exposure and renal failure may benefit from similar evaluation.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Perfluoroalkyl substances and metabolic syndrome

Authors: Christensen, KY; Raymond, M; Meiman, J (2019) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 222:147-153. HERO ID: 5080398

[Less] BACKGROUND: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of contaminants used in many . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of contaminants used in many industrial applications and consumer products. Certain PFAS are regulated or voluntarily limited due to concern about environmental persistence and adverse health effects.

OBJECTIVES: In this analysis we examine PFAS levels and their association with metabolic syndrome and its components, using a representative sample of the U.S.

POPULATION:

METHODS: Data on PFAS levels and metabolic syndrome components were collected from the 2007-2008, 2009-2010, 2011-2012, and 2013-2014 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Twelve different PFAS were measured in serum samples from participants. Logistic regression models were used to identify associations between metabolic syndrome, its individual components, and serum PFAS concentrations.

RESULTS: Over one-third (37%) of participants met the definition for metabolic syndrome, with increased waist circumference and elevated glucose being the most commonly reported components. Seven PFAS were detected in at least 30% of participants and were examined in subsequent analyses (PFDA, PFOA, PFOS, PFHxS, MPAH, PFNA, PFUnDA). The PFAS with the highest concentrations was PFOS (median 8.4 ng/mL), followed by PFOA, PFHxS and PFNA. After adjusting for potential confounders, PFNA was associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome and well as several individual components, while the highest levels of PFHxS were associated with elevated triglycerides. Other PFAS were associated with decreased risk of at least one outcome.

CONCLUSIONS: Associations between PFAS and metabolic syndrome are inconsistent within and across studies. PFNA was consistently associated with increased risk for components of the syndrome, a finding that warrants further investigation.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Serum concentrations of PFASs and exposure-related behaviors in African American and non-Hispanic white women

Authors: Boronow, KE; Brody, JG; Schaider, LA; Peaslee, GF; Havas, L; Cohn, BA (2019) Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 29:206-217. HERO ID: 5080524

[Less] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are used in a wide range of consumer products for their . . . [More] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are used in a wide range of consumer products for their water- and grease-resistant properties, but few studies have explored this exposure route. We used multiple regression to investigate associations between six self-reported behaviors hypothesized to influence PFAS exposure and serum concentrations of six PFAS chemicals in 178 middle-aged women enrolled in the Child Health and Development Studies, about half of whom are African American. Blood samples were collected in 2010-2013, and participants were interviewed about behavior in 2015-2016. Results showed that African American women had lower levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS) compared with non-Hispanic white women. In African Americans, but not others, frequent consumption of prepared food in coated cardboard containers was associated with higher levels of four PFASs. Flossing with Oral-B Glide, having stain-resistant carpet or furniture, and living in a city served by a PFAS-contaminated water supply were also associated with higher levels of some PFASs. Product testing using particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy confirmed that Oral-B Glide and competitor flosses contained detectable fluorine. Despite the delay between blood collection and interview, these results strengthen the evidence for exposure to PFASs from food packaging and implicate exposure from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based dental floss for the first time.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) blood levels after contamination of a community water supply and comparison with 2013-2014 NHANES

Authors: Graber, JM; Alexander, C; Laumbach, RJ; Black, K; Strickland, PO; Georgopoulos, PG; Marshall, EG; Shendell, DG; Alderson, D; Mi, Z; Mascari, M; Weisel, CP (2019) Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 29:172-182. HERO ID: 5080653

[Less] INTRODUCTION: Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluorononanoic . . . [More] INTRODUCTION: Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), including perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), were detected in the community water supply of Paulsboro New Jersey in 2009.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study enrolled 192 claimants from a class-action lawsuit, not affiliated with this study, who had been awarded a blood test for 13 PFAS. Study participants provided their blood test results and completed a survey about demographics; 105 participants also completed a health survey. Geometric means, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentiles of exposure of PFNA blood serum concentrations were compared to that of the 2013-2014 NHANES, adjusted for reporting level. Associations between PFNA, PFOA, PFOS, and PFHxS and self-reported health outcomes were assessed using logistic regression.

RESULTS: PFNA serum levels were 285% higher in Paulsboro compared with U.S. residents. PFNA serum levels were higher among older compared with younger, and male compared to female, Paulsboro residents. After adjustment for potential confounding, there was a significant association between increased serum PFNA levels and self-reported high cholesterol (OR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.29).

DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Further investigation into possible health effects of PFAS exposure in Paulsboro and other community settings is warranted. Since exposure has ceased, toxicokinetics of PFAS elimination should be explored.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Molecular pathways of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease development and progression

Authors: Bessone, F; Razori, MV; Roma, MG (2019) Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS) 76:99-128. HERO ID: 5932838

[Less] Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a main hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. It represents . . . [More] Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a main hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. It represents a wide spectrum of histopathological abnormalities ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with or without fibrosis and, eventually, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. While hepatic simple steatosis seems to be a rather benign manifestation of hepatic triglyceride accumulation, the buildup of highly toxic free fatty acids associated with insulin resistance-induced massive free fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue and the increased de novo hepatic fatty acid synthesis from glucose acts as the "first hit" for NAFLD development. NAFLD progression seems to involve the occurrence of "parallel, multiple-hit" injuries, such as oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, endotoxin-induced, TLR4-dependent release of inflammatory cytokines, and iron overload, among many others. These deleterious factors are responsible for the triggering of a number of signaling cascades leading to inflammation, cell death, and fibrosis, the hallmarks of NASH. This review is aimed at integrating the overwhelming progress made in the characterization of the physiopathological mechanisms of NAFLD at a molecular level, to better understand the factor influencing the initiation and progression of the disease.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: basic pathogenetic mechanisms in the progression from NAFLD to NASH

Author: Pierantonelli I., Svegliati-Baroni G. (2019) 103:e1-e13. HERO ID: 5160096

[Less] Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a growing cause of chronic liver injury, especially . . . [More] Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a growing cause of chronic liver injury, especially in western countries, where it is becoming the most frequent indication for liver transplantation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of diseases that from simple steatosis (pure NAFLD) can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and the mechanisms behind its progression to NASH have been extensively studied. However, although the processes that determine fat accumulation are mostly clear, the mechanisms associated with the progression of the disease are not fully characterized. In predisposed patients, lipid accumulation can promote lipotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction, thus triggering hepatocyte death, inflammation and fibrosis. The specific role of different lipids has been identified and free fatty acids as well as free cholesterol have been identified as toxic species. To make the picture more complex, the pathogenesis of NAFLD involves pathological connections between several organs, including the adipose tissue and the gut, with the liver. The "inflamed" adipose tissue plays a key role in the release of toxic lipids, whereas alterations in the gut-liver axis have been associated with the progression from NAFLD to NASH mediated by dysbiosis, alteration of intestinal barrier, and finally bacterial translocation, which can trigger proinflammatory and profibrogenetic pathways, finally leading to cirrhosis development.