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PFNA (375-95-1)


2,225 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Characterization of age-based trends to identify chemical biomarkers of higher levels in children

Authors: Nguyen, VK; Colacino, JA; Arnot, JA; Kvasnicka, J; Jolliet, O (2019) Environment International 122:117-129. HERO ID: 5043339

[Less] BACKGROUND: Chemical biomarker concentrations are driven by complex interactions between . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Chemical biomarker concentrations are driven by complex interactions between chemical use patterns, exposure pathways, and toxicokinetic parameters such as biological half-lives. Criteria to differentiate legacy from current exposures are helpful for interpreting variation in age-based and time trends of chemical exposure and identifying chemicals to which children are highly exposed. A systematic approach is needed to study temporal trends for a wide range of chemicals in the US population.

OBJECTIVES: Using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data on measured biomarker concentrations for 141 chemicals from 1999 to 2014, we aim to 1) understand the influence of temporal determinants, in particular time trends, biological half-lives, and restriction dates on age-based trends, 2) systematically define an age-based pattern to identify chemicals with ongoing and high exposure in children, and 3) characterize how age-based trends for six Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) are changing over time.

METHODS: We performed an integrated analysis of biological half-lives and restriction dates, compared distributions of chemical biomarker concentrations by age group, and then applied a series of regression models to evaluate the linear (βage) and nonlinear (βage2) relationships between age and chemical biomarker levels.

RESULTS: For restricted chemicals, a minimum persistence of 1 year in the human body is needed to observe substantial differences between the less exposed young population and historically exposed adults. We define a metric ( [Formula: see text] ) that identifies several phthalates, brominated flame retardants, pesticides, and metals such as lead and tungsten as elevated and ongoing exposures in children. While a substantial reduction in children's exposures was reflected in PFOS and PFOA, levels of PFNA and PFHxS in children were higher in 2013-2014 compared to those in 1999-2000.

CONCLUSIONS: Integrating a series of regression models with systemized stratified analyses by age group enabled us to define an age-based pattern to identify chemicals that are of higher levels in children.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Exploring sex differences in human health risk assessment for PFNA and PFDA using a PBPK model

Authors: Kim, SJ; Choi, EJ; Choi, GW; Lee, YB; Cho, HY (2019) Archives of Toxicology 93:311-330. HERO ID: 5063958

[Less] Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), which are classified as perfluoroalkyl . . . [More] Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), which are classified as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), have been widely used in industrial applications as a surface protectant. PFASs have been detected in wildlife and in humans around the globe. The purposes of this study are to develop and validate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for detecting PFNA and PFDA in male and female rats, and to apply the model to a human health risk assessment regarding the sex difference. A PBPK model of PFNA and PFDA was established based on an in vivo study in male and female rats. Analytes in biological samples (plasma, nine tissues, urine, and feces) were determined by ultra-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. PFNA and PFDA showed a gender differences in the elimination half-life and volume of distribution. The tissue-plasma partition coefficients were the highest in the liver in both male and female rats. The predicted rat plasma and urine concentrations simulated and fitted were in good agreement with the observed values. The PBPK models of PFNA and PFDA in male and female rats were then extrapolated to a human PBPK model based on human physiological parameters. The external doses were calculated at 3.35 ng/kg/day (male) and 17.0 ng/kg/day (female) for PFNA and 0.530 ng/kg/day (male) and 0.661 ng/kg/day (female) for PFDA. Human risk assessment was estimated using Korean biomonitoring values considering the gender differences. This study provides valuable insight into human health risk assessment regarding PFNA and PFDA exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Cross-sectional study of the association between serum perfluorinated alkyl acid concentrations and dental caries among US adolescents (NHANES 1999-2012)

Authors: Puttige Ramesh, N; Arora, M; Braun, JM (2019) British Medical Journal Open 9:e024189. HERO ID: 5080517

[Less] STUDY OBJECTIVES: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a class of anthropogenic and persistent . . . [More] STUDY OBJECTIVES: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a class of anthropogenic and persistent compounds that may impact some biological pathways related to oral health. The objective of our study was to estimate the relationship between dental caries prevalence and exposure to four PFAA: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) in a nationally representative sample of US adolescents.

SETTING/DESIGN: We analysed cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2012 for 12-19-year-old US adolescents.

PARTICIPANTS: Of 10 856 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years who had a dental examination, we included 2869 with laboratory measurements for serum PFAA concentrations and complete covariate data in our study.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Dental caries prevalence was defined as the presence of decay or a restoration on any tooth surface, or the loss of a tooth due to tooth decay. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate the covariate-adjusted association between serum PFAA concentrations and dental caries prevalence, accounting for the complex National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey design.

RESULTS: Of 2869 adolescents, 59% had one or more dental caries. We observed no associations between the prevalence of dental caries and serum concentrations of PFOA, PFOS or PFHxS. The adjusted odds of caries were 21% (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.01), 15% (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.67 to 1.08) and 30% (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.90) lower among adolescents in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th serum PFNA concentration quartiles compared to adolescents in the first quartile, respectively. The linear trend for this association was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSION: PFOA, PFOS and PFHxS were not associated with prevalence of dental caries. The prevalence of caries was reduced with increasing serum PFNA concentrations; however, these results should be interpreted cautiously given that we were unable to adjust for several factors related to oral health.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The occurrence of perfluoroalkyl acids in an important feed material (fishmeal) and its potential risk through the farm-to-fork pathway to humans

Authors: Li, X; Dong, S; Zhang, W; Fan, X; Wang, R; Wang, P; Su, X (2019) Journal of Hazardous Materials 367:559-567. HERO ID: 5080591

[Less] Few studies have attempted to elucidate the occurrence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in animal feeds . . . [More] Few studies have attempted to elucidate the occurrence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in animal feeds and how they play a role in human ingestion. Fishmeal was the most important animal-derived feed in global husbandry and may have been subjected to PFAA contamination considering the PFAAs' ubiquitous distribution in aquatic ecosystems. We collected ninety-two commercial fishmeal from the most important fishmeal-producing countries and found that Σ16PFAAs ranged from 0.65 to 85.5 ng/g (average: 18.2 ng/g, 12% moisture). PFOS still predominated, with unexpected high detection of PFUnDA. The wide occurrence of short-chain PFAAs (e.g., PFBA, PFBS) in fishmeal were found for the first time. From a geographical view, PFAA levels in fishmeal that originated from the Northern Hemisphere were significantly higher than those from the Southern Hemisphere (p < 0.01). Higher levels of under-studied long-chain PFAAs (PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA) weighted more in industrialized areas than less industrialized areas, whereas the legacy PFAAs (PFOS, PFOA and PFHxS) were comparable among all regions. The estimated daily intake was calculated from animal feed to humans (via cultured fish) from 20 Chinese provinces by the Monte Carlo Simulation. A proportion of 29.8% of residents from the Fujian Province exceeded the EFSA's suggestion for PFOS ingestion.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human embryonic and fetal organs from first, second, and third trimester pregnancies

Authors: Mamsen, LS; Björvang, RD; Mucs, D; Vinnars, MT; Papadogiannakis, N; Lindh, CH; Andersen, CY; Damdimopoulou, P (2019) Environment International 124:482-492. HERO ID: 5080595

[Less] BACKGROUND: The persistent environmental contaminants perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The persistent environmental contaminants perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have gained attention due to their potential adverse health effects, in particular following early life exposure. Information on human fetal exposure to PFASs is currently limited to one report on first trimester samples. There is no data available on PFAS concentrations in fetal organs throughout all three trimesters of pregnancy.

METHODS: We measured the concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA), and perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) in human embryos and fetuses with corresponding placentas and maternal serum samples derived from elective pregnancy terminations and cases of intrauterine fetal death. A total of 78 embryos and fetuses aged 7-42 gestational weeks were included and a total of 225 fetal organs covering liver, lung, heart, central nervous system (CNS), and adipose tissue were analyzed, together with 71 placentas and 63 maternal serum samples. PFAS concentrations were assayed by liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

RESULTS: All evaluated PFASs were detected and quantified in maternal sera, placentas and embryos/fetuses. In maternal serum samples, PFOS was detected in highest concentrations, followed by PFOA > PFNA > PFDA = PFUnA = PFHxS. Similarly, PFOS was detected in highest concentrations in embryo/fetal tissues, followed by PFOA > PFNA = PFDA = PFUnA. PFHxS was detected in very few fetuses. In general, PFAS concentrations in embryo/fetal tissue (ng/g) were lower than maternal serum (ng/ml) but similar to placenta concentrations. The total PFAS burden (i.e. the sum of all PFASs) was highest in lung tissue in first trimester samples and in liver in second and third trimester samples. The burden was lowest in CNS samples irrespective of fetal age. The placenta:maternal serum ratios of PFOS, PFOA and PFNA increased across gestation suggesting bioaccumulation in the placenta. Further, we observed that the ratios were higher in pregnancies with male fetuses compared to female fetuses.

CONCLUSIONS: Human fetuses were intrinsically exposed to a mixture of PFASs throughout gestation. The compounds were detected in all analyzed tissues, suggesting that PFASs reach and may affect many types of organs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PFASs pass the placenta and deposit to embryo and fetal tissues, calling for risk assessment of gestational exposures.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Maternal levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma related outcomes and infections in the Norwegian Mother and Child (MoBa) cohort

Authors: Impinen, A; Longnecker, MP; Nygaard, UC; London, SJ; Ferguson, KK; Haug, LS; Granum, B (2019) Environment International 124:462-472. HERO ID: 5080609

[Less] INTRODUCTION: Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) has been inconsistently . . . [More] INTRODUCTION: Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) has been inconsistently associated with asthma and allergic diseases and increased number of infections in early childhood. We examined the association of PFASs measured in pregnancy with childhood asthma, allergies and common infectious diseases in a prospective pregnancy cohort followed to age 7 years.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six PFASs (out of 19 measured) with at least 80% of measurements above the limit of quantification (LOQ) in maternal plasma during pregnancy in two subcohorts of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) were analyzed in relation to health outcomes: perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), and perfluoroheptane sulfonic acid (PFHpS). Follow-up questionnaires were completed at 3 years by 1270 women and at 7 years by 972 women among the 1943 with pregnancy questionnaire and PFAS measures. Health outcomes included parent reports of child's symptoms or doctor diagnosed asthma and allergic conditions at age 7 years and parent-reported frequency of various infections at 3 and 7 years of age. Logistic and Poisson regression were used. The false discovery rate was controlled at 5%. Sensitivity analyses on gender were performed.

RESULTS: Among the allergy and asthma outcomes, a statistically significant inverse association was seen between PFUnDA concentrations and ever having atopic eczema in girls. PFUnDA also tended to be inversely associated with both wheeze and asthma. For infections from 0 to 3 and 6 to 7 years, 11 significant positive associations were seen between PFASs and airways infections (bronchitis/pneumonia, throat infection, pseudocroup), ear infection and gastric flu/diarrhea; whereas 6 inverse associations were seen for pseudocroup, ear infections and urinary tract infections. The majority of the findings with respect to infectious diseases were found in girls only.

DISCUSSION: With the exception of an inverse association between PFUnDA and eczema, and a tendency of a similar association for wheeze and asthma, maternal PFAS levels during pregnancy showed little association with asthma or allergy related outcomes. Findings from the present study suggest immunosuppressive effects of PFASs on airways infections, such as bronchitis/pneumonia and throat infections, as well as diarrhea/gastric flu. Our results indicate a possible role of gender in the PFAS-health outcome associations.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Roles of gender and obesity in defining correlations between perfluoroalkyl substances and lipid/lipoproteins

Authors: Jain, RB; Ducatman, A (2019) Science of the Total Environment 653:74-81. HERO ID: 5080642

[Less] Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 2005-2014 for those aged ≥20 years . . . [More] Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for 2005-2014 for those aged ≥20 years fasting for ≥8 h (N = 3629) were analyzed to evaluate the role that gender and obesity play in defining correlations between selected perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and triglycerides. PFAS considered for analyses were: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), and 2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid (Me-FOSAA). Gender and obesity stratified regression models were fitted to estimate associations between PFAS and lipid/lipoproteins with adjustments made for confounders. For obese males, but not for nonobese males, positive associations were found between TC and LDL with PFOA (β = 0.0519, p = 0.01 for TC and β = 0.0822, p = 0.03 for LDL), and PFNA (β = 0.0328, p = 0.03 for TC and β = 0.0679, p = 0.04 for LDL). For obese females, adjusted concentrations of TC increased with increase in the concentrations of PFDA (β = 0.0247, p = 0.048), PFNA (β = 0.0286, p = 0.04), and Me-PFOSAA (β = 0.0274, p = 0.02), and there was a positive association of LDL with PFOS (β = 0.0375, p = 0.04), PFDA (β = 0.0397, p = 0.047), and PFNA (β = 0.0593, p = 0.02). The findings, concerning the relationship of longer chain PFAS to serum lipids, suggest greater susceptibility to elevated TC and LDL cholesterol in the obese participants, with some differences between men and women. The key contributing modifiable risk for nonalcoholic steatosis is obesity, and, the development of nonalcoholic steatosis is recognized to be sexually dimorphic. The epidemiologic observation of a susceptible obese subgroup in our data is consistent with toxicology literature findings of disrupted cholesterol metabolism via induced steatosis following PFAS exposure. Gender differences affect serum concentration of PFAS during the reproductive years, and our data add a secondary question concerning whether they also affect the interaction between PFAS exposure and lipid handling in males and females.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Contaminants in bald eagles of the upper Midwestern U.S.: A framework for prioritizing future research based on in-vitro bioassays

Authors: Elliott, SM; Route, WT; Decicco, LA; Vandermeulen, DD; Corsi, , SR; Blackwell, BR (2019) Environmental Pollution 244:861-870. HERO ID: 5080644

[Less] Several organic contaminants (OCs) have been detected in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestling . . . [More] Several organic contaminants (OCs) have been detected in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestling (eaglet) plasma in the upper Midwestern United States. Despite frequent and relatively high concentrations of OCs in eaglets, little is understood about potential biological effects associated with exposure. We screened an existing database of OC concentrations in eaglet plasma collected from the Midwestern United States against bioactivity information from the ToxCast database. ToxCast bioactivity information consists of concentrations expected to elicit responses across a range of biological space (e.g. cellular, developmental, etc.) obtained from a series of high throughput assays. We calculated exposure-activity ratios (EAR) by calculating the ratio of plasma concentrations to concentrations available in ToxCast. Bioactivity data were not available for all detected OCs. Therefore, our analysis provides estimates of potential bioactivity for 19 of the detected OCs in eaglet plasma. Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) EAR values were consistently the highest among all study areas. Maximum EAR values were ≥1 for PFOS, perfluorononanoic acid, and bisphenol A in 99.7, 0.53 and 0.26% of samples, indicating that some plasma concentrations were greater than what may be expected to elicit biological responses. About 125 gene targets, indicative of specific biological pathways, were identified as potentially being affected. Inhibition of several CYP genes, involved in xenobiotic metabolism, were most consistently identified. Other identified biological responses have potential implications for motor coordination, cardiac functions, behavior, and blood circulation. However, it is unclear what these results mean for bald eagles, given that ToxCast data are generated using mammalian-based endpoints. Despite uncertainties and limitations, this method of screening environmental data can be useful for informing future monitoring or research focused on understanding the occurrence and effects of OCs in bald eagles and other similarly-positioned trophic species.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Distribution of perfluorinated alkyl substances in marine shellfish along the Chinese Bohai Sea coast

Authors: Guo, M; Zheng, G; Peng, J; Meng, D; Wu, H; Tan, Z; Li, F; Zhai, Y (2019) Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes 54:1-10. HERO ID: 5080518

[Less] Perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging persistent organic pollutants, which pose a threat . . . [More] Perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFASs) are emerging persistent organic pollutants, which pose a threat to human health primarily by dietary exposure, especially through seafood. Bohai Sea (a semi-closed sea located north of China) is an important shellfish aquaculture area that is possibly highly-polluted with PFASs. In this study, we first evaluated contamination by PFASs in a total of 230 samples of marine shellfish from the Bohai Sea. Samples included five important shellfish species, collected from important aquaculture spots distributed around the Bohai Sea. Samples were analyzed by an ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, which could simultaneously detect 23 PFASs in shellfish. Our research verified that PFASs have become a threat to the safety of shellfish products in this area. Furthermore, contamination by PFASs in shellfish changed depending on the components of PFASs, the species of shellfish, and the sampling sites. Many of the 23 target compounds contributed to the high detection ratio (>50%) as follows: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) > perfluorononanoic acid > perfluorodecanesulfonic acid > perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). Compared with other dominant components, PFOA not only had the highest detection percentage in shellfish samples (98.3%), but its detection level contributed to 87.2% of total PFASs concentrations, indicating that PFOA is the major threat to the safety of shellfish products. The highest level of PFAS was found in clams (62.5 ng g-1 wet weight of PFOA). The concentration of total PFAS in different shellfish species showed the following trend: clams > mussels > scallops > whelks > oysters. The maximum concentration of total PFAS or PFOA was found in Shouguang. The total concentration of PFOS and its precursor were highest in Cangzhou, possibly due to local industrial activities. The results presented in this paper provide new data on the contamination of marine shellfish along the Bohai Sea coasts in China, and constitute a reference for future monitoring of contamination by emerging contaminants in Bohai coast.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Perfluoroalkyl substances are inversely associated with coronary heart disease in adults with diabetes

Authors: Honda-Kohmo, K; Hutcheson, R; Innes, KE; Conway, BN (2019) Journal of Diabetes and its Complications 33:407-412. HERO ID: 5080551

[Less] AIMS: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are environmentally and biologically persistent . . . [More] AIMS: Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are environmentally and biologically persistent synthetic environmental contaminants linked to adverse health outcomes. Though null to modest inverse relationships between PFAS and coronary heart disease (CHD) have been reported, studies regarding relationships in high risk populations such as those with diabetes are sparse. We investigated the relationship of PFAS with CHD in persons with diabetes.

METHODS: Data on 5270 adults, aged ≥20 years, with diabetes were obtained from the C8 Health Project. Four PFAS were investigated separately: perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA).

RESULTS: In logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, diabetes duration, BMI, smoking, lipids, WBC, CRP, eGFR, uric acid, hemoglobin and iron, all PFAS were inversely associated with CHD, ORs (95% CIs): PFHxS; 0.72 (0.65-0.79), PFOA; 0.90 (0.81-0.96), PFOS; 0.90 (0.81-0.99), PFNA; 0.88 (0.76-1.02). Stratification by chronic kidney disease status revealed similar inverse relationships for those with and without chronic kidney disease.

CONCLUSIONS: In this cross-sectional study of over 5000 adults with diabetes, PFAS showed inverse associations with CHD. These findings may, if confirmed in future studies, provide new physiologic understanding of CHD prevention strategies.