Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Molybdenum (7439-98-7 )


20,705 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Distribution of Trace Elements in Biological Material

Author: Sundara Rao, AL (1940) HERO ID: 4843790

[Less] The distribution of trace elements manganese (7439965) (Mn), zinc (7440666) (Zn), and molybdenum (7439987) . . . [More] The distribution of trace elements manganese (7439965) (Mn), zinc (7440666) (Zn), and molybdenum (7439987) (Mo) was examined in representative cereals, pulses, and leafy vegetables. Samples were washed, spread in thin layers to dry, cut into small pieces, dried, ground, bottled and ignited in a platinum crucible over a Bunsen flame. Spectra were photographed with a Hilger spectrograph, and arc spectra were excited with silver and graphite electrodes. Rice, wheat, Bengal gram, black gram, peas, amaranth, spinach, and cabbage were tested. Mn present ranged from 11.8 milligrams (mg) in cabbage to 82.3mg in spinach; Zn present ranged from 2.0mg in rice to 62.3mg in spinach; Mo present ranged from 0.1mg in rice to 9.4mg in peas. The author notes that there is a continuous increase in the proportion of sodium and alkaline earth metals and iron, progressing from cereals to pulses and leafy vegetables. Trace elements are present in appreciable amounts and may play definite and specific roles in human and animal nutrition.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The Influence Of Arsenic And Certain Other Elements On The Toxicity Of Seleniferous Grains

Authors: Moxon, AL; Dubois, KP (1939) HERO ID: 4843871

[Less] The effect of arsenic (7440382) on the toxicity of selenium (7782492) was investigated in rats. Rats . . . [More] The effect of arsenic (7440382) on the toxicity of selenium (7782492) was investigated in rats. Rats were fed diets containing 11 parts per million (ppm) selenium in wheat. Animals were divided into groups given drinking water containing 5ppm tungsten (7440337), fluorine (7782414), molybdenum (7439987), arsenic, chromium (7440473), vanadium (7440622), cadmium (7440439), zinc (7440666), cobalt (7440484), uranium (7440611), or nickel (7440020). Additional groups received selenium diet with no elements in drinking water or distilled water and a selenium free diet. Differences in weight and food consumption were noted. Survivors were killed on day 130 and examined for liver damage. By day 60, there was an increase in mortality rate in rats given fluorine, molybdenum, chromium, cadmium, vanadium, zinc, cobalt, and uranium. All rats in the tungsten and arsenic groups were living and normal in appearance on day 60. Examination of livers of rats fed selenium alone, selenium with nickel, and of controls were normal. Liver concentrations of selenium in the group given arsenic were much lower than in other groups, except for the one surviving rat given vanadium. None of the rats given tungsten had any appreciable liver damage. Rats were given selenium and 2.5ppm arsenic or tungsten in water for 75 days and autopsied. Arsenic partially prevented liver damage in rats fed selenium; they consumed more food and grew more rapidly than rats not given arsenic. Tungsten had no effect in preventing the symptoms of selenium poisoning, but rats given tungsten with selenium lived longer than those given selenium alone.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Chemistry department

Author: Hill, JA (1933) HERO ID: 4844042


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Contamination of Food Cooked or Stored in Contact with Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys

Authors: Titus, AC; Elkins, HB; Finn, HG; Fairhall, LT; Drinker, CK (1930) HERO ID: 4843806

[Less] Alloys of nickel (7440020), chromium (7440473), iron (7439896), and in some cases molybdenum (7439987) . . . [More] Alloys of nickel (7440020), chromium (7440473), iron (7439896), and in some cases molybdenum (7439987) used in cooking utensils were studied with regard to corrosion, weight loss, and contamination of food during cooking. The three alloys examined contained 65.3 to 74 percent iron, 17 to 18 percent chromium, 8 to 15 percent nickel, and 0 to 3.7 percent molybdenum. Alloy strips were cooked with various foods for 1 hour. Weight loss of the strips after cooking was determined, and degree of tarnish was assessed. Food cooked for 1 hour in alloy containers was analyzed for metal content before and after cooking to determine metal uptake. The weight loss of the alloy strips did not differ significantly between alloys and ranged from 0 to 9.6 milligrams (mg) per 4 square decimeters per hour. Weight loss was not affected by food pH. Degree of tarnishing also did not differ between alloys and was not affected by food pH. Uptake of metal by 400 grams of food in contact for 1 hour with 4 square decimeters of alloy ranged from 0.01 to 4.20mg iron, 0 to 1.40mg chromium, 0 to 0.24mg nickel, and 0 to 0.05mg molybdenum. Fish and corn showed the most contamination. The alloy containing 67 percent iron, 18 percent chromium, and 15 percent nickel produced the least contamination, averaging 2.56mg iron, 0.12mg chromium, and 0.16mg nickel. The authors conclude that the alloys tested are hygienically safe for cooking purposes.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Toxicity of Tungsten and Molybdenum Compounds

Author: Karantassis, MT (1924) HERO ID: 4843923

[Less] The toxicity of sodium-tungstate (13472452) and ammonium-molybdate (13106768) is tested in guinea-pigs. . . . [More] The toxicity of sodium-tungstate (13472452) and ammonium-molybdate (13106768) is tested in guinea-pigs. Doses ranging from 0.50-0.75 gram given orally to 575-640 gram guinea-pigs produced death after 5-23 hours. Symptoms before death included anorexia, colic, uncoordinated movements, sudden jumps, trembling and dyspnea. Autopsy showed the stomach full or containing a bloody, greenish pap like substance; the large intestine almost always full or soft, bloody, diarrheic fecal matter; small discolored spots in the liver approximately 4 millimeters in diameter; and Tardieu's spots in the lungs. Tungstate was found in the stomach, intestine, their content and walls, liver, kidneys, lungs, blood and urine. Hypodermic administration of doses ranging from 0.10-0.50 gram gave more pronounced and sustained symptoms. Autopsy showed intense liver congestion, large infarction in each lung, dark blood in the heart, and yellow patches of degeneration in the liver and kidneys. The studies with the molybdenum (7439987) compound showed it to be less toxic than the tungsten (7440337) compound. Both act as slow toxins, with death resulting from asphyxial symptoms. Tests for detecting tungsten and molybdenum in biological materials are briefly outlined. (French; English translation available)