Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Biphenyl


394 References Were Found:

Technical Report
Technical Report

Recommended use of body weight 3/4 as the default method in derivation of the oral reference dose

Author: U.S. EPA (2011) (1-50). (EPA/100/R11/0001). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Risk Assessment Forum, Office of the Science Advisor. HERO ID: 752972

[Less] Recommended Use of Body Weight 3/4 as the Default Method in Derivation of the Oral Reference Dose presents . . . [More] Recommended Use of Body Weight 3/4 as the Default Method in Derivation of the Oral Reference Dose presents Body Weight ¾ as the default methodology for interspecies dosimetric extrapolation for use in toxicological studies using animal data to assess effects on humans. The document lays out the scientific rationale for such an approach, the modifications to the application of interspecies uncertainty factors, and provides the methods for computing the Dosimetric Adjustment Factor to determine the human equivalent dose. This document has undergone both internal (within EPA) and external peer review and public comment. The final document reflects the comments submitted through the review process.

Historically, EPA has applied a direct cross-species extrapolation based on body weight (BW1/1) for noncancer endpoints while applying a body weight3/4 extrapolation for cancer endpoints. By modifying the scaling to BW3/4 for noncancer endpoints this document harmonizes the default methodology for assessing risks for cancer and noncancer endpoints.

Archival Material
Archival Material

Toxicological profiles: Information about contaminants found at hazardous waste sites

Author: ATSDR (2011) Available online at http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/index.asp. [Website] HERO ID: 684152

[Less] The ATSDR toxicological profile succinctly characterizes the toxicologic and adverse health effects . . . [More] The ATSDR toxicological profile succinctly characterizes the toxicologic and adverse health effects information for the hazardous substance described here. Each peer-reviewed profile identifies and reviews the key literature that describes a hazardous substance's toxicologic properties. Other pertinent literature is also presented, but is described in less detail than the key studies.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Review of the Environmental Protection Agency's draft IRIS assessment of formaldehyde

Author: NRC (2011) (1-194). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. HERO ID: 710724

[Less] Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air, and everyone is exposed to formaldehyde at some . . . [More] Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air, and everyone is exposed to formaldehyde at some concentration daily. Formaldehyde is used to produce a wide array of products, particularly building materials; it is emitted from many sources, including power plants, cars, gas and wood stoves, and cigarettes; it is a natural product in come foods; and it is naturally present in the human body as a metabolic intermediate. Much research has been conducted on the health effects of exposure to formaldehyde, including effects on the upper airway, where formaldehyde is deposited when inhaled, and effects on tissues distant from the site of initial contact. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released noncancer and cancer assessments of formaldehyde for its Intergated Risk Information System (IRIS) in 1990 and 1991, respectively. The agency began reassessing formaldehyde in 1998 and released a draft IRIS assessment in June 2010. Given the complexity of the issues and the knowledge that the assessment will be used as the basis of regulatory decisions, EPA asked the National Research Council (NRC) to conduct an independent scientific review of the draft IRIS assessment. In this report, the Committee to Review EPA's Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde first addresses some general issues associated with the draft IRIS assessment. The committee next focuses on questions concerning specific aspects of the draft assessment, including derivation of the reference concentrations and the cancer unit risk estimates for formaldehyde. The committee closes with recommendations for improving the IRIS assessment of formaldehyde and provides some general comments on the IRIS development process.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Ingested nitrate and nitrite, and cyanobacterial peptide toxins

Author: IARC (2010) Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer. [IARC Monograph] HERO ID: 597416


Technical Report
Technical Report

2010 TLVs and BEIs: Based on the documentation of the threshold limit values for chemical substances and physical agents and biological exposure indices

Author: ACGIH (2010) Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. [TLV/BEI] HERO ID: 625688


Archival Material
Archival Material

OSHA standard 1915.1000 for air contaminants. Part Z, toxic and hazardous substances

Author: OSHA (2010) Available online at http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10286. (May 2, 2010). [Website] HERO ID: 625691


Journal Article
Journal Article

[Kinetics of distribution and elimination of biphenyl]

Authors: Golovenko, MY; Shneider, NV; Larionov, VB (2009) Sovremennye Problemy Toksikologii 2:42-45. HERO ID: 1290635

[Less] The work is dedicated to the anal. of distribution and excretion pharmacokinetics data anal. of biphenyl . . . [More] The work is dedicated to the anal. of distribution and excretion pharmacokinetics data anal. of biphenyl in mice after oral administration. The brain/serum ratio remained stable due to blood-brain barrier functioning. The excretion route of biphenyl and its metabolites is renal.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Biological basis of differential susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenesis among mouse strains

Author: Maronpot, RR (2009) HERO ID: 782857

[Less] There is a vast amount of literature related to mouse liver tumorigenesis generated over the past 60 . . . [More] There is a vast amount of literature related to mouse liver tumorigenesis generated over the past 60 years, not all of which has been captured here. The studies reported in this literature have generally been state of the art at the time they were carried out. A PubMed search on the topic "mouse liver tumors" covering the past 10 years yields over 7000 scientific papers. This review address several important topics related to the unresolved controversy regarding the relevance of mouse liver tumor responses observed in cancer bioassays. The inherent mouse strain differential sensitivities to hepatocarcinogenesis largely parallel the strain susceptibility to chemically induced liver neoplasia. The effects of phenobarbital and halogenated hydrocarbons in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis have been summarized because of recurring interest and numerous publications on these topics. No single simple paradigm fully explains differential mouse strain responses, which can vary more than 50-fold among inbred strains. In addition to inherent genetics, modifying factors including cell cycle balance, enzyme induction, DNA methylation, oncogenes and suppressor genes, diet, and intercellular communication influence susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mouse hepatocarcinogenesis. Comments are offered on the evaluation, interpretation, and relevance of mouse liver tumor responses in the context of cancer bioassays.

Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

2009 TLVs and BEIs: Threshold limit values for chemical substances and physical agents and biological exposure indices

Author: ACGIH (2009) Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. HERO ID: 594528


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Elemental composition of suspended particulate matter and sediments in the coastal environment of Thermaikos Bay, Greece: Delineating the impact of inland waters and wastewaters

Authors: Violintzis, C; Arditsoglou, A; Voutsa, D (2009) Journal of Hazardous Materials 166:1250-1260. HERO ID: 590050

[Less] An integrate study on the occurrence of major, minor and trace elements in the coastal environment of . . . [More] An integrate study on the occurrence of major, minor and trace elements in the coastal environment of Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea, was carried out. The elemental composition of marine sediments and suspended particulate matter from Thermaikos Bay as well as the composition of suspended particles from various inland water (3 rivers and 4 streams) and wastewater (4 types of municipal and industrial origin) end up to the gulf was investigated during the period 2005-2006. The elemental profiles and characteristics of particulate matter from the examined water-types were discussed. The pollution status of marine sediments was evaluated by employing enrichment factors and sediment quality guidelines (TEL/PEL, ERM/ERL). Zn, Cu, Pb, As and Ag were found to have significant contribution from anthropogenic sources. Sites located at the northern part of the bay exhibited higher pollution indices and can be considered of medium-high priority. Principal Component Analysis was employed to find out the factors affecting the composition of the sediments and suspended particulate matter and to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities in the elemental profiles between the different water-types.