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Asbestos


1,392 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Non-neoplastic and neoplastic pleural endpoints following fiber exposure

Authors: Broaddus, VC; Everitt, JI; Black, B; Kane, AB (2011) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews 14:153-178. [Review] HERO ID: 758900

[Less] Exposure to asbestos fibers is associated with non-neoplastic pleural diseases including plaques, fibrosis, . . . [More] Exposure to asbestos fibers is associated with non-neoplastic pleural diseases including plaques, fibrosis, and benign effusions, as well as with diffuse malignant pleural mesothelioma. Translocation and retention of fibers are fundamental processes in understanding the interactions between the dose and dimensions of fibers retained at this anatomic site and the subsequent pathological reactions. The initial interaction of fibers with target cells in the pleura has been studied in cellular models in vitro and in experimental studies in vivo. The proposed biological mechanisms responsible for non-neoplastic and neoplastic pleural diseases and the physical and chemical properties of asbestos fibers relevant to these mechanisms are critically reviewed. Understanding mechanisms of asbestos fiber toxicity may help us anticipate the problems from future exposures both to asbestos and to novel fibrous materials such as nanotubes. Gaps in our understanding have been outlined as guides for future research.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The role of iron in Libby amphibole-induced acute lung injury and inflammation

Authors: Shannahan, JH; Ghio, AJ; Schladweiler, MC; Mcgee, JK; Richards, JH; Gavett, SH; Kodavanti, UP (2011) Inhalation Toxicology 23:313-323. HERO ID: 759001

[Less] Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause . . . [More] Complexation of host iron (Fe) on the surface of inhaled asbestos fibers has been postulated to cause oxidative stress contributing to in vivo pulmonary injury and inflammation. We examined the role of Fe in Libby amphibole (LA; mean length 4.99 µm ± 4.53 and width 0.28 µm ± 0.19) asbestos-induced inflammogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. LA contained acid-leachable Fe and silicon. In a cell-free media containing FeCl(3), LA bound #17 µg of Fe/mg of fiber and increased reactive oxygen species generation #3.5 fold, which was reduced by deferoxamine (DEF) treatment. In BEAS-2B cells exposure to LA, LA loaded with Fe (FeLA), or LA with DEF did not increase HO-1 or ferritin mRNA expression. LA increased IL-8 expression, which was reduced by Fe loading but increased by DEF. To determine the role of Fe in LA-induced lung injury in vivo, spontaneously hypertensive rats were exposed intratracheally to either saline (300 µL), DEF (1 mg), FeCl(3) (21 µg), LA (0.5 mg), FeLA (0.5 mg), or LA + DEF (0.5 mg). LA caused BALF neutrophils to increase 24 h post-exposure. Loading of Fe on LA but not chelation slightly decreased neutrophilic influx (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). At 4 h post-exposure, LA-induced lung expression of MIP-2 was reduced in rats exposed to FeLA but increased by LA + DEF (LA + DEF > LA > FeLA). Ferritin mRNA was elevated in rats exposed to FeLA compared to LA. In conclusion, the acute inflammatory response to respirable fibers and particles may be inhibited in the presence of surface-complexed or cellular bioavailable Fe. Cell and tissue Fe-overload conditions may influence the pulmonary injury and inflammation caused by fibers.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The role of cardiovascular disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

Authors: Shannahan, J; Schladweiler, M; Padilla-Carlin, D; Nyska, A; Richards, J; Ghio, A; Gavett, S; Kodavanti, U (2011) Inhalation Toxicology 23:129-141. HERO ID: 759099

[Less] Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound . . . [More] Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-overload and oxidative stress. Healthy male Wistar Kyoto (WKY), spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and SH heart failure (SHHF) rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.0, 0.25 or 1.0  mg/rat LA and examined at 1 day, 1 week or 1 month. Although histologically it was not possible to distinguish severity differences between strains in LA-induced initial inflammation and later fibrosis, quantitative assessment of biomarkers showed strain-related differences. LA-induced neutrophilic inflammation was reversible in WKY but persisted more in SH and SHHF. Lung MIP-2 mRNA increased only in WKY at 1 day in response to LA but not in SH and SHHF. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein increased in SH but not WKY at 1 week and 1 month, while γ-glutamyltransferase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activities increased in all strains (WKY>SH=SHHF). BALF ferritin levels were high at baseline and increased following LA exposure only in SH and SHHF. Ferritin heavy chain mRNA increased only in SHHF at 1 day. At 1 month ferritin light chain mRNA declined from already high baseline levels in SHHF but increased in WKY and SH suggesting its differential involvement in LA-induced injury in Fe-overload. Unlike WKY, both SHHF and SH failed to increase the lung lining antioxidant, ascorbate, in response to LA. We conclude that underlying CVD-associated Fe-overload is likely linked to persistent lung injury, inflammation and antioxidant decompensation following LA exposure in rats.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Pulmonary endpoints (lung carcinomas and asbestosis) following inhalation exposure to asbestos

Authors: Mossman, BT; Lippmann, M; Hesterberg, TW; Kelsey, KT; Barchowsky, A; Bonner, JC (2011) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews 14:76-121. [Review] HERO ID: 781992

[Less] Lung carcinomas and pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) occur in asbestos workers. Understanding the pathogenesis . . . [More] Lung carcinomas and pulmonary fibrosis (asbestosis) occur in asbestos workers. Understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases is complicated because of potential confounding factors, such as smoking, which is not a risk factor in mesothelioma. The modes of action (MOA) of various types of asbestos in the development of lung cancers, asbestosis, and mesotheliomas appear to be different. Moreover, asbestos fibers may act differentially at various stages of these diseases, and have different potencies as compared to other naturally occurring and synthetic fibers. This literature review describes patterns of deposition and retention of various types of asbestos and other fibers after inhalation, methods of translocation within the lung, and dissolution of various fiber types in lung compartments and cells in vitro. Comprehensive dose-response studies at fiber concentrations inhaled by humans as well as bivariate size distributions (lengths and widths), types, and sources of fibers are rarely defined in published studies and are needed. Species-specific responses may occur. Mechanistic studies have some of these limitations, but have suggested that changes in gene expression (either fiber-catalyzed directly or by cell elaboration of oxidants), epigenetic changes, and receptor-mediated or other intracellular signaling cascades may play roles in various stages of the development of lung cancers or asbestosis.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Factors that impact susceptibility to fiber-induced health effects

Authors: Below, JE; Cox, NJ; Fukagawa, NK; Hirvonen, A; Testa, JR (2011) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews 14:246-266. HERO ID: 781995

[Less] Asbestos and related fibers are associated with a number of adverse health effects, including malignant . . . [More] Asbestos and related fibers are associated with a number of adverse health effects, including malignant mesothelioma (MM), an aggressive cancer that generally develops in the surface serosal cells of the pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal cavities. Although approximately 80% of individuals with MM are exposed to asbestos, fewer than 5% of asbestos workers develop MM. In addition to asbestos, other mineralogical, environmental, genetic, and possibly viral factors might contribute to MM susceptibility. Given this complex etiology of MM, understanding susceptibility to MM needs to be a priority for investigators in order to reduce exposure of those most at risk to known environmental carcinogens. In this review, the current body of literature related to fiber-associated disease susceptibility including age, sex, nutrition, genetics, asbestos, and other mineral exposure is addressed with a focus on MM, and critical areas for further study are recommended.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Role of mutagenicity in asbestos fiber-induced carcinogenicity and other diseases

Authors: Huang, SX; Jaurand, MC; Kamp, DW; Whysner, J; Hei, TK (2011) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews 14:179-245. [Review] HERO ID: 781994

[Less] The cellular and molecular mechanisms of how asbestos fibers induce cancers and other diseases are not . . . [More] The cellular and molecular mechanisms of how asbestos fibers induce cancers and other diseases are not well understood. Both serpentine and amphibole asbestos fibers have been shown to induce oxidative stress, inflammatory responses, cellular toxicity and tissue injuries, genetic changes, and epigenetic alterations in target cells in vitro and tissues in vivo. Most of these mechanisms are believe to be shared by both fiber-induced cancers and noncancerous diseases. This article summarizes the findings from existing literature with a focus on genetic changes, specifically, mutagenicity of asbestos fibers. Thus far, experimental evidence suggesting the involvement of mutagenesis in asbestos carcinogenicity is more convincing than asbestos-induced fibrotic diseases. The potential contributions of mutagenicity to asbestos-induced diseases, with an emphasis on carcinogenicity, are reviewed from five aspects: (1) whether there is a mutagenic mode of action (MOA) in fiber-induced carcinogenesis; (2) mutagenicity/carcinogenicity at low dose; (3) biological activities that contribute to mutagenicity and impact of target tissue/cell type; (4) health endpoints with or without mutagenicity as a key event; and finally, (5) determinant factors of toxicity in mutagenicity. At the end of this review, a consensus statement of what is known, what is believed to be factual but requires confirmation, and existing data gaps, as well as future research needs and directions, is provided.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mode(s) of Action of Asbestos and Related Mineral Fibers: A meeting summary report

Authors: Gwinn, MR; Devoney, D; Jarabek, A; Sonawane, B; Wheeler, J; Weissman, DN; Masten, SA; Thompson, C (2011) Environmental Health Perspectives 119:1806-1810. HERO ID: 781996

[Less] Background: Although asbestos in general is well known to cause a range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic . . . [More] Background: Although asbestos in general is well known to cause a range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic human health effects, not all asbestos fiber types have the same disease causing potential and the modes of action (MOA) of specific types of asbestos and related fibers for various health outcomes are not well understood. Objectives: A workshop was held to discuss the state-of-the-science of the MOA for asbestos-related disease. The objective was to review the range of asbestos-induced health effects (including those at sites remote to the respiratory tract). We sought to identify existing knowledge gaps and define what research is needed to address these gaps and advance asbestos research. Discussion: Discussions centered on areas of uncertainty in the field, including how asbestos is defined and characterized, the role of different fiber characteristics (e.g., length and mineralogy) in disease and the impact of low-dose exposures on human health. Studying the dosimetry and mode of action of multiple fiber types would enhance our understanding asbestos-related disease. To better elucidate MOA of specific asbestos fibers, there is a need for data to inform the risk assessor as to asbestos' specific characteristics in determining fiber toxicity (e.g., surface area, mineral type, etc.), which may inform efforts to assess and control exposures and prevent adverse human health outcomes for the diverse range of fiber types. Specific research aims were defined for these topics and for overarching issues which should be addressed, including the use of standardized terminology, test materials and better experimental models to aid in data extrapolation to humans. To resolve these and other issues, there is a need for coordination between scientific disciplines to better understand the MOA leading to the various asbestos-related disease endpoints.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Lung function, radiological changes and exposure: Analysis of ATSDR data from Libby, MT, USA

Authors: Weill, D; Dhillon, G; Freyder, L; Lefante, J; Glindmeyer, H (2011) European Respiratory Journal 38:376-383. HERO ID: 711555

[Less] In 2000, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR; Atlanta, GA, USA) investigated . . . [More] In 2000, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR; Atlanta, GA, USA) investigated lung disease in those exposed to the tremolite-contaminated vermiculite mine in Libby, MT, USA. Previously unreported spirometric results are presented here in relation to exposure and radiographic findings.

4,524 study participants were assigned to one of seven mutually exclusive exposure categories. Associations among radiographic findings, spirometric results and exposure were investigated, along with the effect of a reduction in exposure potential when production was moved to a wet process mill in the mid 1970s.

Spirometry data for the total population by smoking status and age were within the normal range. Prevalence of pleural plaque increased with age, but was lowest in the environmentally exposed group (0.42–12.74%) and greatest in the W.R. Grace & Co. mineworkers (20–45.68%). For males, there was a significant (4.5%) effect of pleural plaques on forced vital capacity. For W.R. Grace & Co. workers and household contacts, a reduction in plaque (0.11 versus 1.64%) and in diffuse pleural thickening or costophrenic angle obliteration (1.94 and 0.13%) was noted for those exposed after 1976.

These analyses do not support a clinically important reduction in spirometry of this cohort. The 1976 reductions in exposure have led to decrease in radiographic changes.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Nonpulmonary outcomes of asbestos exposure

Authors: Bunderson-Schelvan, M; Pfau, JC; Crouch, R; Holian, A (2011) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B: Critical Reviews 14:122-152. [Review] HERO ID: 781993

[Less] The adverse pulmonary effects of asbestos are well accepted in scientific circles. However, the extrapulmonary . . . [More] The adverse pulmonary effects of asbestos are well accepted in scientific circles. However, the extrapulmonary consequences of asbestos exposure are not as clearly defined. In this review the potential for asbestos to produce diseases of the peritoneum, immune, gastrointestinal (GIT), and reproductive systems are explored as evidenced in published, peer-reviewed literature. Several hundred epidemiological, in vivo, and in vitro publications analyzing the extrapulmonary effects of asbestos were used as sources to arrive at the conclusions and to establish areas needing further study. In order to be considered, each study had to monitor extrapulmonary outcomes following exposure to asbestos. The literature supports a strong association between asbestos exposure and peritoneal neoplasms. Correlations between asbestos exposure and immune-related disease are less conclusive; nevertheless, it was concluded from the combined autoimmune studies that there is a possibility for a higher-than-expected risk of systemic autoimmune disease among asbestos-exposed populations. In general, the GIT effects of asbestos exposure appear to be minimal, with the most likely outcome being development of stomach cancer. However, IARC recently concluded the evidence to support asbestos-induced stomach cancer to be "limited." The strongest evidence for reproductive disease due to asbestos is in regard to ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, effects on fertility and the developing fetus are under-studied. The possibility of other asbestos-induced health effects does exist. These include brain-related tumors, blood disorders due to the mutagenic and hemolytic properties of asbestos, and peritoneal fibrosis. It is clear from the literature that the adverse properties of asbestos are not confined to the pulmonary system.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A computer model for the simulation of fiber-cell interaction in the alveolar region of the respiratory tract

Author: Sturm, R (2011) Computers in Biology and Medicine 41:565-573. HERO ID: 1081316

[Less] A mathematical model is presented that describes the health-endangering interaction of fibrous particles . . . [More] A mathematical model is presented that describes the health-endangering interaction of fibrous particles deposited in the human alveoli with alveolar fluids, cells, and tissues. As suggested by the theoretical approach, short fibers (diameter: 0.5 μm, length: 2-10 μm) are preferably ingested by alveolar macrophages and removed from the alveolar surface 10-15 days after exposure. Long (diameter: 0.5 μm, length: 10-50 μm) biopersistent fibers are not effectively cleared from the alveoli due to the repeated process of frustrated phagocytosis. Long biosoluble fibers also undergo a frustrated phagocytosis, with processes of extensive lysis leading to their significant shortening. The decrease in length causes the initiation of those clearance mechanisms that are efficient for short fibers.