Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Fatty alcohols (112-92-5, 661-19-8, 629-96-9, & 143-28-2)


159 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Recurrent contact cheilitis because of glyceryl isostearate, diisostearyl maleate, oleyl alcohol, and Lithol Rubine BCA in lipsticks

Authors: Inui, S; Azukizawa, H; Katayama, I (2009) Contact Dermatitis 60:231-232. HERO ID: 4929340

[Less] A 28-year-old woman presented with a several year history of persistent itchy and scaly erythema on . . . [More] A 28-year-old woman presented with a several year history of persistent itchy and scaly erythema on the lips, which appeared after using five different kinds of lipsticks, A–E. Because we suspected contact dermatitis to ingredients of these lipsticks, we patch tested her with the lipsticks A–E (as is) and the ingredients of lipsticks D and E provided by the manufacturers. The patient showed positive reactions to all lipsticks and oleyl alcohol (10% pet.), diisostearyl maleate (40% pet.), glyceryl isostearate (1% pet.), and Lithol Rubine BCA (Pigment Red 57, Red 202; CAS 5281-04-91) (1% pet.) (Table 1). These concentrations were the same as those in lipsticks D and E. Three normal controls showed negative reactions to these ingredients. Our patient stopped using these lipsticks, now only occasionally using lip cream free from these allergens and she is now symptom free.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Screening-level hazard characterization: long chain alcohols category

Author: U.S. EPA (2009) HERO ID: 4949218


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Allergic contact dermatitis because of topical use of 5-fluorouracil (Efudix cream)

Authors: Meijer, BU; de Waard-Van der Spek, FB (2007) Contact Dermatitis 57:58-60. HERO ID: 4936405


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Comedogenicity in rabbit: some cosmetic ingredients/vehicles

Authors: Nguyen, SH; Dang, TP; Maibach, HI (2007) Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology 26:287-292. HERO ID: 1616835

[Less] The rabbit external ear canal was used to define which chemicals caused comedone formation on topical . . . [More] The rabbit external ear canal was used to define which chemicals caused comedone formation on topical application. Some of the tested ingredients are currently used in topically applied formulations. Certain raw materials have been shown to produce follicular hyperkeratosis in the rabbit ear assay. This study quantifies comedogenic potential of cosmetic materials, including: isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl myristate, butyl stearate, isopropyl isostearate, decyl oleate, isostearyl neopentanoate, isocetyl stearate, myristle myristate, cocoa butter, cetyl alcohol, paraffin, stearyl alcohol sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and petrolatum. The first nine were deemed positive. Factors aiding clinical relevance are listed.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Evaluation of lotion formulations on irritation using the modified forearm-controlled application test method

Authors: Farage, MA; Ebrahimpour, A; Steimle, B; Englehart, J; Smith, D (2007) Skin Research and Technology 13:268-279. HERO ID: 4944301

[Less] BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Cold and allergy sufferers often develop irritation around the nostrils as a result . . . [More] BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Cold and allergy sufferers often develop irritation around the nostrils as a result of repeated and frequent rubbing of the skin site with facial tissues. This irritation is a combination of the inherent irritant properties of the tissue components (chemical irritation), and mechanical irritation from friction. Lotion-coated facial tissues are being developed to provide soothing, skin benefits, and to promote healing of this type of irritation. The objective of these studies was to evaluate the efficacy of different lotion formulations on facial tissues in preventing irritation, or aiding in the healing of irritation.

METHODS: The modified forearm-controlled application test (Modified FCAT) was adapted as a means of quickly evaluating the relative skin benefits of various lotion formulations used to coat facial tissues. The test was conducted on the volar surface of the forearms of volunteer subjects. Test sites were pretreated with 24 h occlusive patches of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) to induce mild or moderate skin irritation. This was followed by repeated wiping of the lotion-coated tissues. Irritation was evaluated using visual scoring for erythema and dryness. Lotion formulation options were compared in the model. Comparisons included assessments of the type of fatty alcohol in the formulation (stearyl and cetearyl alcohol), the presence of silicone and the base formulation (mineral oil, petrolatum of a proprietary formula).

RESULTS: Differences in the degree of erythema and dryness were detected among various formulation options. No differences were found between formulations containing stearyl or cetearyl alcohol. Low levels of silicone produced benefits in one of two experiments. The proprietary base formula produced greater reductions in erythema following treatment of SLS-irritated skin compared with mineral oil and petrolatum bases.

CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that this modification of the FCAT can be used to compare various lotion formulations for skin benefits and healing properties, and to rank qualitatively the benefits of various formulation options.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Patch testing with components of water-based metalworking fluids: results of a multicentre study with a second series

Authors: Geier, J; Lessmann, H; Becker, D; Bruze, M; Frosch, PJ; Fuchs, T; Jappe, U; Koch, P; Pföhler, C; Skudlik, C (2006) Contact Dermatitis 55:322-329. HERO ID: 1313686

[Less] BACKGROUND: Although many allergens in metalworking fluids (MWF) are identified, there . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Although many allergens in metalworking fluids (MWF) are identified, there are still some MWF components, which are not sufficiently investigated concerning their sensitizing properties.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate sensitization to 10 frequently used MWF components, which are not part of the established MWF test series, in metalworkers with suspected occupational dermatitis due to MWF.

PATIENTS/METHODS: Oleyl alcohol, myristyl alcohol, dimethylolurea, 4,4'-methylenebis morpholine, imazalil, 1-amino-2-propanol (monoisopropanolamine; MIPA), 2-amino-2-ethyl-1,3-propanediol (AEPD), 2,5-bis(n-octyldithio)-1,3,4-thiadiazole, zinc alkyl dithiophosphate and dibenzyl disulfide have been patch tested in 144 patients.

RESULTS: 7 patients reacted positively to the formaldehyde releaser 4,4'-methylenebis morpholine, and 6 of these patients also reacted to formaldehyde and/or other formaldehyde releasers. 4 patients reacted positively to myristyl alcohol tested at 10% petrolatum (pet.). Additionally, 20 doubtful or irritant reactions occurred. 1 patient each reacted positively to oleyl alcohol, MIPA, and AEPD. None of the other test substances mentioned above elicited any clear-cut positive reaction. Patch testing with well-known MWF allergens showed proportions of positive reactions, which were comparable to those from other studies, e.g. 11% to monoethanolamine, 8% to colophonium and 3%-5% to various preservatives.

CONCLUSIONS: 4,4'-methylenebis morpholine may be an important MWF allergen, although clinical relevance could not be stated definitely in every case. Myristyl alcohol should not be patch tested at 10% pet., but at a lesser concentration, due to irritant properties.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Allergic contact dermatitis from oleyl alcohol in Elidel cream

Authors: Andersen, KE; Broesby-Olsen, S (2006) Contact Dermatitis 55:354-356. HERO ID: 4929370

[Less] We report an atopic dermatitis patient with recurrent hand dermatitis who developed a severe allergic . . . [More] We report an atopic dermatitis patient with recurrent hand dermatitis who developed a severe allergic contact dermatitis from the use of Elidel cream. Diagnostic patch tests showed an isolated contact allergy to the emulsifier oleyl alcohol present in the product. Pimecrolimus appeared to have had an aggravating effect on the dermatitis in spite of its immunosuppressive effects. The initial clinical appearance of the patient's widespread dermatitis was atypical with resemblance to subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Even though emulsifiers are widely used in topical products, contact allergic reactions to these are relatively uncommon.

Technical Report
Technical Report

SIDS initial assessment report for SIAM 22. TOME 2: SIDS dossiers. Category name: long chain alcohols

Author: OECD (2006) Paris, France: OECD. HERO ID: 4949228

[Less] SIDS dossiers already existed for 1-Dodecanol (CAS 112-53-8) and 1-Octadecanol (CAS 112-92-5) (published . . . [More] SIDS dossiers already existed for 1-Dodecanol (CAS 112-53-8) and 1-Octadecanol (CAS 112-92-5) (published in 1998 and 1995 respectively); the present document updates and extends the earlier ones; brings in new information, and therefore replaces it. No conclusions drawn in the earlier review are amended.

Available data for these substances are compiled in SIDS dossiers related to each CAS number. The reliability of each data point has been considered during this period of review, in accordance with the guidance of the Fraunhofer Institut für Toxikologie und Aerosolforschung. The following standard reliability codes, defined by Klimisch et al. (1997)1, apply, in accordance with the SIDS guidance:
(1) Valid without restriction
(2) Valid with restrictions
(3) Invalid
(4) Not assignable.
Results considered to be Invalid are not used in the discussions or conclusions in this report. However, results which are of Non-assignable reliability may be fully valid, although insufficient details were available to be sure of this; therefore reliability (4) results are used in this report. The reliability code of each data point is given.

Key studies are flagged in the SIDS dossiers. These are studies with the highest reliability/adequacy. If several studies showed comparable reliability/ adequacy, the study with the lowest LC/LD/EC50 or NOEC/ NOAEL has been indicated as the key study. For some endpoints, fully reliable results are not available and it has been necessary to use a weight of evidence including results of studies of non-assignable reliability. In such cases the results are identified as key studies as they are of high importance to the data set.

For transparency, some study summaries in the SIDS dossier have been transferred from the previously published version of IUCLID or from the previous SIDS submission. In some cases, it has not been possible to retrieve the original literature/study reports using the reported citation or as a result of literature searching. In some cases, change of business ownership meant that internal study reports cited in previous summaries could not be accessed. In some other cases, e.g. certain non-SIDS endpoints, and in areas where a very large amount of literature has been published, it was not considered necessary to pursue all individual published sources due to weight of evidence of more reliable results. In all cases, reliability (4) applies, because the original documentation has not been reviewed in the development of the dossier. Such results are clearly identified in the SIDS dossier and more details are given therein.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Evaluation of chemical enhancers in the transdermal delivery of lidocaine

Authors: Lee, PJ; Ahmad, N; Langer, R; Mitragotri, S; Prasad Shastri, V (2006) International Journal of Pharmaceutics 308:33-39. HERO ID: 1617542

[Less] The effect of various classes of chemical enhancers was investigated for the transdermal delivery of . . . [More] The effect of various classes of chemical enhancers was investigated for the transdermal delivery of the anesthetic lidocaine across pig and human skin in vitro. The lipid disrupting agents (LDA) oleic acid, oleyl alcohol, butenediol, and decanoic acid by themselves or in combination with isopropyl myristate (IPM) showed no significant flux enhancement. However, the binary system of IPM/n-methyl pyrrolidone (IPM/NMP) improved drug transport. At 2% lidocaine dose, this synergistic enhancement peaked at 25:75 (v/v) IPM:NMP with a steady state flux of 57.6 +/- 8.4 microg cm(-2) h(-1) through human skin. This observed flux corresponds to a four-fold enhancement over a 100% NMP solution and over 25-fold increase over 100% IPM at the same drug concentration (p < 0.001). NMP was also found to co-transport through human skin with lidocaine free base and improve enhancement due to LDA. These findings allow a more rational approach for designing oil-based formulations for the transdermal delivery of lidocaine free base and similar drugs.

Data/Software
Data/ Software

HSDB: 1-Docosanol

Author: NLM (2006) Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Health, U.S. National Library of Medicine. HERO ID: 4949226