Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


PFDA (335-76-2)


57 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances in foods and the dietary exposure among Taiwan general population and pregnant women

Authors: Chen, WL; Bai, FY; Chang, YC; Chen, PC; Chen, CY (2018) Journal of Food and Drug Analysis 26:994-1004. HERO ID: 4771044

[Less] This study quantified five perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and two perfluorosulfonic acids in cereals, . . . [More] This study quantified five perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and two perfluorosulfonic acids in cereals, meats, seafood, eggs, pork liver, and milk in Taiwan using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and evaluated the dietary exposure of the general population and pregnant women using per capita consumption and a questionnaire, respectively. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and PFCAs of 10-12 carbons were found in almost all of the samples in considerable concentrations in rice and pork liver, reaching as high as 283 ng/g (PFOA in pork liver); the levels are two to three orders of magnitude higher than previous reports. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), the most frequently mentioned perfluoroalkyl substance, was rarely detected in many food items (detection frequencies <20% in rice, flour, pork, chicken, salmon, squid, eggs, and milk) at <0.4 ng/g, except for beef, pork liver and some seafood (detection frequencies: 100%, GMs: 0.05-3.52 ng/g). Compared to populations in Western countries, people in Taiwan are exposed to much more perfluorohexanoic acid, PFOA, perfluorodecanoic acid, and perfluoroundecanoic acid (11.2, 85.1, 44.2, and 4.45 ng/kg b.w./day, respectively), mainly due to the higher contaminations in food. The exposure of 8.0 μg PFOA/person/day in the 95 percentile of pregnant women was due to their frequent consumption of pork liver.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Residues, bioaccumulations and biomagnification of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquatic animals from Lake Chaohu, China

Authors: Liu, W; He, W; Wu, J; Qin, N; He, Q; Xu, F (2018) Environmental Pollution 240:607-614. HERO ID: 5079805

[Less] Residual levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in seven species of aquatic animals were analyzed by . . . [More] Residual levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in seven species of aquatic animals were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The distribution, composition, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification of PFAAs and their effect factors were studied. The results showed that: 1) Wet weight concentrations of 17 PFAAs in the aquatic animals ranged from 1.77 to 38.65 ng/g, with a mean value of 12.71 ± 9.21 ng/g. PFOS was the predominant contaminant (4.57 ± 4.57 ng/g, 6.76%-46.25%), followed by PFDA (1.95 ± 1.37 ng/g, 11.68%-21.25%) and PFUdA (1.84 ± 1.21 ng/g, 9.73%-35.34%. 2) PFAA residual levels in Culter erythropterus (30.98 ± 6.65 ng/g) were the highest, followed by Hemibarbus maculatus (16.79 ± 1.88 ng/g), while the PFAA levels in Carassius auratus were the lowest (2.22 ± 0.60 ng/g). 3) Biota-water bioaccumulation factors (BAFs), biota-suspended solid accumulation factors (BSSAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) ranged from 0.35 to 12,370.51, 7.77 to 8452.92 and 9.10 to 6984.61, respectively. Bioaccumulation by shrimp and snails was significantly affected by Kow. 4) Food web magnification factors were greater than 1, indicating that biomagnification of PFAAs occurs across trophic levels. The bioaccumulation and biomagnification of PFAAs were significantly correlated with carbon chain length.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Occurrence of perfluoroalkyl substances in matched human serum, urine, hair and nail

Authors: Wang, Y; Zhong, Y; Li, J; Zhang, J; Lyu, B; Zhao, Y; Wu, Y (2018) Journal of Environmental Sciences 67:191-197. HERO ID: 5079797

[Less] The purpose of this study was to determine perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human serum, urine, . . . [More] The purpose of this study was to determine perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in human serum, urine, hair and nail from general populations, and to investigate the possibility for human urine, hair and nail used as the biomonitoring sample for PFASs exposure. We detected the concentrations of PFHxA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, PFDoA, PFHxS and PFOS in 39 matched human serum, urine, hair and nail samples from Shenzhen in China. The detection frequency and the median level of PFOS were all higher than that of the other PFASs in four matrices. The median concentration of PFOS in serum, urine, hair, and nail were 9.24ng/mL, 13.96ng/L, 0.58ng/g and 0.63ng/g, respectively. The results of spearman correlation test indicated that nail was an ideal matrix for biomonitoring PFOS rather than human urine and hair in general populations for the non-invasive sampling.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Modeling emerging contaminants breakthrough in packed bed adsorption columns by UV absorbance and fluorescing components of dissolved organic matter

Authors: Sgroi, M; Anumol, T; Roccaro, P; Vagliasindi, FGA; Snyder, SA (2018) Water Research 145:667-677. HERO ID: 5080268

[Less] This study investigated, using rapid small-scale column testing, the breakthrough of dissolved organic . . . [More] This study investigated, using rapid small-scale column testing, the breakthrough of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and eleven emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) during granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration of different water qualities, including wastewater, surface water and synthetic water (riverine organic matter dissolved in deionized water). Fluorescing organic matter was better adsorbed than UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in all tested water. Furthermore, highest adsorption of DOM (in terms of DOC, UV254 and fluorescence) was observed during wastewater filtration. UV absorbing DOM had fast and similar breakthrough in surface water and synthetic water, whereas fluorescence breakthrough was very rapid only in synthetic water. PARAFAC modeling showed that different fluorescing components were differently adsorbed during GAC process. Particularly, fluorescing components with maxima intensity at higher excitation wavelengths, which are corresponding to humic-like fluorescence substances, were better removed than other components in all waters. As opposed to DOM, EOCs were better adsorbed during synthetic water filtration, whereas the fastest EOCs breakthrough was observed during filtration of wastewater, which was the water that determined the highest carbon fouling. Exception was represented by long-chained perfluoroalkylated substances (i.e., PFOA, PFDA and PFOS). Indeed, adsorption of these compounds resulted independent of water quality. In this study was also investigated the applicability of UV254 and fluorescing PARAFAC components to act as surrogates in predicting EOCs removal by GAC in different water matrices. Empirical linear correlation for the investigated EOCs were determined with UV254 and fluorescing components in all water qualities. However, fluorescence measurements resulted more sensitive than UV254 to predict EOC breakthrough during GAC adsorption. When the data from all water qualities was combined, good correlations between the microbial humic-like PARAFAC component and EOC removals were still observed and they resulted independent of water quality if considering only real water matrices (wastewater and surface water). On the contrary, correlations between EOC removals and UV254 removals were independent of water quality when combining data of surface waters and synthetic water, but a different correlation model was needed to predict EOCs breakthrough in wastewater.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of carbon chain length on the perfluoroalkyl acids-induced oxidative stress of erythrocytes in vitro

Authors: Pan, X; Qin, P; Liu, R; Yu, W; Dong, X (2018) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 66:6414-6420. HERO ID: 5079735

[Less] Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been found extensively in wildlife and human bodies by sources of . . . [More] Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been found extensively in wildlife and human bodies by sources of drinking water and food. In this study, we investigated the effects of three PFAAs, perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), on the antioxidative defense system and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes separately. The results demonstrated that they could lead to significant decline trends in the glutathione (GSH) levels together with increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) content, suggesting that three PFAAs induced oxidative stress to erythrocytes. Also PFDA with a longer carbon chain length posed more of a threat than other two PFAAs. Furthermore, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were also altered in the presence of PFAAs upon erythrocytes. The changes of oxidative stress markers and the concomitant alterations of antioxidant enzymes suggest the role of oxidative stress in PFAA-induced damage upon erythrocytes.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of steaming on contaminants of emerging concern levels in seafood

Authors: Barbosa, V; Maulvault, AL; Alves, RN; Kwadijk, C; Kotterman, M; Tediosi, A; Fernández-Tejedor, M; Sloth, JJ; Granby, K; Rasmussen, RR; Robbens, J; De Witte, B; Trabalón, L; Fernandes, JO; Cunha, SC; Marques, A (2018) Food and Chemical Toxicology 118:490-504. HERO ID: 4618390

[Less] Seafood consumption is a major route for human exposure to environmental contaminants of emerging concern . . . [More] Seafood consumption is a major route for human exposure to environmental contaminants of emerging concern (CeCs). However, toxicological information about the presence of CeCs in seafood is still insufficient, especially considering the effect of cooking procedures on contaminant levels. This study is one among a few who evaluated the effect of steaming on the levels of different CeCs (toxic elements, PFCs, PAHs, musk fragrances and UV-filters) in commercially relevant seafood in Europe, and estimate the potential risks associated with its consumption for consumers. In most cases, an increase in contaminant levels was observed after steaming, though varying according to contaminant and seafood species (e.g. iAs, perfluorobutanoate, dibenzo(ah)anthracene in Mytilus edulis, HHCB-Lactone in Solea sp., 2-Ethylhexyl salicylate in Lophius piscatorius). Furthermore, the increase in some CeCs, like Pb, MeHg, iAs, Cd and carcinogenic PAHs, in seafood after steaming reveals that adverse health effects can never be excluded, regardless contaminants concentration. However, the risk of adverse effects can vary. The drastic changes induced by steaming suggest that the effect of cooking should be integrated in food risk assessment, as well as accounted in CeCs regulations and recommendations issued by food safety authorities, in order to avoid over/underestimation of risks for consumer health.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inter-individual, inter-city, and temporal trends of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in human milk from Swedish mothers between 1972 and 2016

Authors: Nyberg, E; Awad, R; Bignert, A; Ek, C; Sallsten, G; Benskin, JP (2018) Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts 20:1136-1147. HERO ID: 5079687

[Less] Inter-individual, inter-city, and temporal trends of 19 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) . . . [More] Inter-individual, inter-city, and temporal trends of 19 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were investigated in human milk collected in Stockholm (1972-2016) and Gothenburg (2007-2015), Sweden. The concentrations of perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA), and perfluorotridecanoate (PFTrDA) in human milk from Stockholm increased significantly over the entire monitoring periods, whereas branched (Br) and linear (L) isomers of perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA) decreased. In human milk from Gothenburg, significant downward trends were detected for perfluorododecanoate (PFDoDA), PFHxS and Br-perfluorooctane sulfonate (Br-PFOS) over the last decade. This declining trend was also observed for perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), PFHxS, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and Br-PFOS in Stockholm over the same time period. No significant differences were observed in concentrations or relative PFAS profiles between Stockholm and Gothenburg. However, a comparison of the PFAS profile in Stockholm milk revealed distinct profiles for the time periods 1972-1996, 2000-2012, and 2013-2016, reflecting a shift in exposure over time. The lower bound estimated daily intake (EDI) for ∑PFAS concentrations in infants ranged from 7.1-40 ng per kg body weight per day (ng/kg bw/d) in Stockholm and from 5.2-25 ng/kg bw/d in Gothenburg over the studied time period, consistent with other European countries. Overall these data indicate that exposure to some legacy PFASs via breastmilk is declining, presumably as a result of regulation and phase-out initiatives. However, increasing concentrations for other PFASs and a shift in the overall PFAS profile in recent years may pose an ongoing health risk to infants.