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Arsenic (Inorganic)

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The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Antimony (Sb) and Arsenic (As) in Sb Mining Impacted Paddy Soil from Xikuangshan, China: Differences in Mechanisms Controlling Soil Sequestration and Uptake in Rice

Authors: Okkenhaug, G; Zhu, YG; He, J; Li, X; Luo, L; Mulder, J (In Press) Environmental Science and Technology. HERO ID: 1015789

[Less] Foods produced on soils impacted by antimony (Sb) mining activities are a potential health risk due . . . [More] Foods produced on soils impacted by antimony (Sb) mining activities are a potential health risk due to plant uptake of the contaminant metalloids (Sb) and arsenic (As). Here we report for the first time the chemical speciation of Sb in soil and porewater of flooded paddy soil, impacted by active Sb mining, and its effect on uptake and speciation in rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv Jiahua). Results are compared with behavior and uptake of As. Pot experiments were conducted under controlled conditions in a climate chamber over a period of 50 days. In pots without rice plants, flooding increased both the concentration of dissolved Sb (up to ca. 2000 μg L(-1)) and As (up to ca. 1500 μg L(-1)). When rice was present, Fe plaque developing on rice roots acted as a scavenger for both As and Sb, whereby the concentration of As, but not Sb, in porewater decreased substantially. Dissolved Sb in porewater, which occurred mainly as Sb(V), correlated with Ca, indicating a solubility governed by Ca antimonate. No significant differences in bioaccumulation factor and translocation factor between Sb and As were observed. Greater relative concentration of Sb(V) was found in rice shoots compared to rice root and porewater, indicating either a preferred uptake of Sb(V) or possibly an oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) in shoots. Adding soil amendments (olivine, hematite) to the paddy soil had no effect on Sb and As concentrations in porewater.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Rapid sample preparation procedure for As speciation in food samples by LC-ICP-MS

Authors: Batista, BL; Nacano, LR; De Souza, SS; Barbosa, F (In Press) Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A: Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment. HERO ID: 1015849

[Less] This paper describes a rapid method for arsenic (As) speciation by LC-ICP-MS in several types of food . . . [More] This paper describes a rapid method for arsenic (As) speciation by LC-ICP-MS in several types of food samples. Prior to analysis, samples were milled and the As species extracted from biological tissues by sonication in only 2 min with a solution containing MeOH (10%, v/v) plus HNO(3) (2%, v/v). As species were separated by LC using an anion exchange column. Method detection limits for AsB, As(3+), DMA, MMA and As(5+) were 1.3, 0.9, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8 ng g(-1), respectively. Method accuracy and precision were traceable to Certified Reference Materials SRM1577 bovine liver from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, CE278 mussel tissue from the Institute of Reference Materials and Measurements and DOLT-3 dogfish liver tissue and DORM-3 fish protein from the National Research Council of Canada. Finally, the method was applied to speciate As in food samples (egg, fish muscle, beef and chicken) purchased in Brazilian markets.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Silibinin potentially protects arsenic-induced oxidative hepatic dysfunction in rats

Authors: Muthumani, M; Prabu, SM (In Press) Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods. HERO ID: 1015878

[Less] Arsenic (As) compounds are reported as environmental toxicants and human carcinogens. Exposure to arsenic . . . [More] Arsenic (As) compounds are reported as environmental toxicants and human carcinogens. Exposure to arsenic imposes a big health issue worldwide. Silibinin (SB) is a major flavonolignan compound of silimarin and is found in milk thistle of Silybum marianum. It has been reported that silibinin has antioxidant efficacy as metal chelators due to the orientation of its functional groups. However, it has not yet been explored in experimental animals. In view of this fact, the purpose of this study was to delineate the ameliorative role of silibinin against arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were orally treated with arsenic alone (5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day) plus silibinin (75 mg/kg bw/day) for 4weeks. Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by the increased activities of serum hepatospecific enzymes namely aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase and total bilirubin along with increased elevation of lipid peroxidative markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl content and conjugated dienes. The toxic effect of arsenic was also indicated by significantly decreased activities of membrane bound ATPases, enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase along with nonenzymatic antioxidants like reduced glutathione, total sulfhydryl groups, vitamins C and E. Administration of silibinin exhibited a significant reversal of arsenic-induced toxicity in hepatic tissue. All these changes were supported by reduction of DNA damage in hepatocytes and histopathological observations of the liver. These results suggest that silibinin has a potential protective effect over arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in rat.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Oxidation of arsenite by two β-proteobacteria isolated from soil

Authors: Bachate, SP; Khapare, RM; Kodam, KM (In Press) Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. HERO ID: 1003602

[Less] Two heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, SPB-24 and SPB-31 were isolated from garden soil. Based . . . [More] Two heterotrophic As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, SPB-24 and SPB-31 were isolated from garden soil. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain SPB-24 was closely related to genus Bordetella, and strain SPB-31 was most closely related to genus Achromobacter. Both strains exhibited high As(III) (15 mM for SPB-24 and 40 mM for SPB-31) and As(V) (>300 mM for both strains) resistance. Both strains oxidized 5 mM As(III) in minimal medium with oxidation rate of 554 and 558 μM h(-1) for SPB-24 and SPB-31, respectively. Washed cells of both strains oxidized As(III) over broad pH and temperature range with optimum pH 6 and temperature 42°C for both strains. The As(III) oxidation kinetic by washed cells showed K (m) and V (max) values of 41.7 μM and 1,166 μM h(-1) for SPB-24, 52 μM and 1,186 μM h(-1) for SPB-31. In the presence of minimal amount of carbon source, the strains showed high As(III) oxidation rate and high specific arsenite oxidase activity. The ability of strains to resist high concentration of arsenic and oxidize As(III) with highest rates reported so far makes them potential candidates for bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated environment.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phytochelatins play a key role in arsenic accumulation and tolerance in the aquatic macrophyte Wolffia globosa

Authors: Zhang, X; Uroic, MK; Xie, W-Y; Zhu, Y-G; Chen, B-D; McGrath, SP; Feldmann, J; Zhao, F-J (In Press) Environmental Pollution. HERO ID: 1015678

[Less] The rootless duckweed Wolffia globosa can accumulate and tolerate relatively large amounts of arsenic . . . [More] The rootless duckweed Wolffia globosa can accumulate and tolerate relatively large amounts of arsenic (As); however, the underlying mechanisms were unknown. W. globosa was exposed to different concentrations of arsenate with or without l-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase. Free thiol compounds and As(III)-thiol complexes were identified and quantified using HPLC - high resolution ICP-MS - accurate mass ESI-MS. Without BSO, 74% of the As accumulated in the duckweed was complexed with phytochelatins (PCs), with As(III)-PC(4) and As(III)-PC(3) being the main species. BSO was taken up by the duckweed and partly deaminated. The BSO treatment completely suppressed the synthesis of PCs and the formation of As(III)-PC complexes, and also inhibited the reduction of arsenate to arsenite. BSO markedly decreased both As accumulation and As tolerance in W. globosa. The results demonstrate an important role of PCs in detoxifying As and enabling As accumulation in W. globosa.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Ameliorative effect Trichosanthes dioica root against experimentally induced arsenic toxicity in male albino rats

Authors: Bhattacharya, S; Haldar, PK (In Press) Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology. HERO ID: 1015695

[Less] The present study evaluated the ameliorative potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Trichosanthes dioica . . . [More] The present study evaluated the ameliorative potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Trichosanthes dioica root (TDA) against arsenic induced toxicity in male albino rats. TDA (5 and 10mg/kg) was administered orally to rats for 20 consecutive days before oral administration of sodium arsenite (10mg/kg) for 8 days. Then the body weights, organ weights, haematological profiles, serum biochemical profile; hepatic and renal antioxidative parameters viz. lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and DNA fragmentation were evaluated. Pretreatment with TDA markedly and significantly normalized body weights, organ weights, haematological profiles, serum biochemical profile and significantly modulated all the hepatic and renal biochemical parameters and reduced DNA fragmentation in arsenic intoxicated rats. The present findings conclude that T. dioica root possessed remarkable ameliorative effect against arsenic induced organ toxicity in male albino rats mediated by alleviation of arsenic induced oxidative stress by multiple mechanisms.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A real-time biomonitoring system to detect arsenic toxicity by valve movement in freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea

Authors: Chen, W-Y; Jou, L-J; Chen, S-H; Liao, C-M (In Press) Ecotoxicology. HERO ID: 1015725

[Less] Arsenic (As) is the element of greatest ecotoxicological concern in aquatic environments. Effective . . . [More] Arsenic (As) is the element of greatest ecotoxicological concern in aquatic environments. Effective monitoring and diagnosis of As pollution via a biological early warning system is a great challenge for As-affected regions. The purpose of this study was to synthesize water chemistry-based bioavailability and valve daily rhythm in Corbicula fluminea to design a biomonitoring system for detecting waterborne As. We integrated valve daily rhythm dynamic patterns and water chemistry-based Hill dose-response model to build into a programmatic mechanism of inductance-based valvometry technique for providing a rapid and cost-effective dynamic detection system. A LabVIEW graphic control program in a personal computer was employed to demonstrate completely the functional presentation of the present dynamic system. We verified the simulated dissolved As concentrations based on the valve daily rhythm behavior with published experimental data. Generally, the performance of this proposed biomonitoring system demonstrates fairly good applicability to detect waterborne As concentrations when the field As concentrations are less than 1 mg L-1. We also revealed that the detection times were dependent on As exposure concentrations. This biomonitoring system could particularly provide real-time transmitted information on the waterborne As activity under various aquatic environments. This parsimonious C. fluminea valve rhythm behavior-based real-time biomonitoring system presents a valuable effort to promote the automated biomonitoring and offers early warnings on potential ecotoxicological risks in regions with elevated As exposure concentrations.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Removal characteristics of As(III) and As(V) from acidic aqueous solution by steel making slag

Authors: Oh, C; Rhee, S; Oh, M; Park, J (In Press) Journal of Hazardous Materials. HERO ID: 1015737

[Less] This study focused on the environmental risk of steel making slag itself, arsenic removal mechanism . . . [More] This study focused on the environmental risk of steel making slag itself, arsenic removal mechanism and re-leaching possibility of arsenic to aqueous state after the adsorption. The purpose of the study is to promote the use of steel making slag as a low-cost adsorbent for arsenic in aqueous system. Calcium was easily dissolved out from the slag and become the dominant substance in the leachate. Some of the calcium could form amorphous calcium carbonate in alkaline condition, and arsenic in the aqueous solution would be removed by being co-precipitated with or adsorbed onto the amorphous calcium carbonate. Most of the amorphous calcium carbonate containing arsenic would be bound to amorphous iron oxide of the slag. When the slag was used as an adsorbent for arsenic removal, a little amount of toxic chemicals were leached from the slag itself under pH 0.8 to 13.6. Also, 70-80% of arsenic laden on the slag was bound to amorphous iron oxide which would not easily desorb unless given a reducing and complexing condition. Showing 95-100% removal efficiency near initial pH 2, the slag, therefore, could be used as an appropriate adsorbent for eliminating arsenic in acidic aqueous solution.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Co-contamination of arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of unconsolidated aquifers under reducing environments

Authors: Kim, S-H; Kim, K; Ko, K-S; Kim, Y; Lee, K-S (In Press) Chemosphere. HERO ID: 1015768

[Less] The co-contamination of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F(-)) in shallow aquifers is frequently observed . . . [More] The co-contamination of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F(-)) in shallow aquifers is frequently observed worldwide, and the correlations between those contaminants are different according to the redox conditions. This study geochemically explores the reasons for the co-contamination and for the redox-dependent correlations by investigating the groundwater of an alluvial aquifer in Korea. Geochemical signatures of the groundwater in the study area show that the As concentrations are enriched by the reductive dissolution of Fe-(hydr)oxides, and the correlations between As and F(-) concentrations are poor comparatively to those observed in the oxidizing aquifers. However, F(-) concentrations are strongly dependent on pH. Desorption/adsorption experiments using raw soils and citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite treated soils indicated that Fe-(hydr)oxides are the important As and F(-) hosts causing the co-contamination phenomenon. The weaker correlation between F(-) and As in reducing aquifers is likely to be associated with sulfate reduction, which removes As from groundwater without changing the F(-) concentration.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mobilization of iron and arsenic from soil by construction and demolition debris landfill leachate

Authors: Wang, Y; Sikora, S; Kim, H; Dubey, B; Townsend, T (In Press) Waste Management. HERO ID: 1015903

[Less] Column experiments were performed to examine (a) the potential for leachate from construction and demolition . . . [More] Column experiments were performed to examine (a) the potential for leachate from construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills to mobilize naturally-occurring iron and arsenic from soils underlying such facilities and (b) the ability of crushed limestone to remove these aqueous phase pollutants. In duplicate columns, water was added to a 30-cm layer of synthetic C&D debris, with the resulting leachate serially passed through a 30-cm soil layer containing iron and arsenic and a 30-cm crushed limestone layer. This experiment was conducted for two different soil types (one high in iron (10,400mg/kg) and the second high in iron (5400mg/kg) and arsenic (70mg/kg)); also monitored were control columns for both soil types with water infiltration alone. Despite low iron concentrations in the simulated C&D debris leachate, elevated iron concentrations were observed when leachate passed through the soils; reductive dissolution was concluded to be the cause of iron mobilization. In the soil containing elevated arsenic, increased iron mobilization from the soil was accompanied by a similar but delayed arsenic mobilization. Since arsenic sorbs to oxidized iron soil minerals, reductive dissolution of these minerals results in arsenic mobilization. Crushed limestone significantly reduced iron (to values below the detection limit of 0.01mg/L in most cases); however, arsenic was not removed to any significant extent.