Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-PM (current)


137 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inhalation of fine particulate matter during pregnancy increased IL-4 cytokine levels in the fetal portion of the placenta

Authors: de Melo, JO; Soto, SF; Katayama, IA; Wenceslau, CF; Pires, AG; Veras, MM; Furukawa, LNS; de Castro, I; Nascimento Saldiva, PH; Heimann, JC (2015) Toxicology Letters 232:475-480. HERO ID: 3010467

[Less] This study aimed to verify the development of placental and systemic inflammation in rats exposed to . . . [More] This study aimed to verify the development of placental and systemic inflammation in rats exposed to fine particulate matter before or during pregnancy. Wistar rats were exposed to filtered air ( control) or to a load of 600 mu g/m(3) of fine particles in the air. The gene expression of IL-1 beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-gamma, TNF-alpha and Toll-like receptor 4 in the placenta was evaluated. The serum and placental concentrations of IL-1 beta, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha were measured. The total and differential blood leukocyte and blood platelet count was assessed. Compared to control animals, IL-4 content was elevated in the fetal portion of the placenta in rats exposed to air pollution before and during pregnancy. Increased IL-4 suggests that a placental inflammatory reaction may have occurred in response to exposure to fine particulate matter and that this cytokine was responsible, among possibly others factors, for resolution of the inflammatory reaction. (c) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inflammatory and vasoactive effects of serum following inhalation of varied complex mixtures

Authors: Aragon, MJ; Chrobak, I; Brower, J; Roldan, L; Fredenburgh, LE; Mcdonald, JD; Campen, MJ (2015) Cardiovascular Toxicology 16:163-171. HERO ID: 3011666

[Less] Chronic cardiovascular disease is associated with air pollution exposure in epidemiology and toxicology . . . [More] Chronic cardiovascular disease is associated with air pollution exposure in epidemiology and toxicology studies. Inhaled toxicants can induce changes in serum bioactivity that impact endothelial inflammatory gene expression in vitro and impair vasorelaxation ex vivo, which are common precursors to atherosclerosis. Comparisons between single pollutants and common combustion mixtures, in terms of driving such serum inflammatory and vasoactive effects, have not been characterized. Healthy C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single 6-h period of contrasting pollutant atmospheres: road dust, mixed vehicle emissions (MVE; a combination of gasoline and diesel engine emissions) particulate matter, mixed vehicle emissions gases, road dust plus ozone, road dust plus MVE, and hardwood smoke. Serum obtained from mice 24 h after these exposures was used as a stimulus to assess inflammatory potential in two assays: incubated with primary murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells for 4 h to measure inflammatory gene expression or applied to naïve aortic rings in an ex vivo myographic preparation. Road dust and wood smoke exposures were most potent at inducing inflammatory gene expression, while MVE atmospheres and wood smoke were most potent at impairing vasorelaxation to acetylcholine. Responses are consistent with recent reports on MVE toxicity, but reveal novel serum bioactivity related to wood smoke and road dust. These studies suggest that the compositional changes in serum and resultant bioactivity following inhalation exposure to pollutants may be highly dependent on the composition of mixtures.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Personal exposure to PM2.5, genetic variants and DNA damage: A multi-center population-based study in Chinese

Authors: Chu, M; Sun, C; Chen, W; Jin, G; Gong, J; Zhu, M; Yuan, J; Dai, J; Wang, M; Pan, Y; Song, Y; Ding, X; Guo, X; Du, M; Xia, Y; Kan, H; Zhang, Z; Hu, Z; Wu, T; Shen, H (2015) Toxicology Letters 235:172-178. HERO ID: 3011769

[Less] Exposure to particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5) may result in DNA damage, a major culprit in mutagenesis . . . [More] Exposure to particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5) may result in DNA damage, a major culprit in mutagenesis and environmental toxicity. DNA damage levels may vary among individuals simultaneously exposed to PM2.5, however, the genetic determinants are still unclear. To explore whether PM2.5 exposure and genetic variants contribute to the alteration in DNA damage, we recruited 328 subjects from three independent cohorts (119 from Zhuhai, 123 from Wuhan and 86 from Tianjin) in southern, central and northern China with different PM2.5 exposure levels. Personal 24-h PM2.5 exposure levels and DNA damage levels of peripheral blood lymphocytes were evaluated. Genotyping were performed using Illumina Human Exome BeadChip with 241,305 single nucleotide variants (SNVs). The DNA damage levels are consistent with the PM2.5 exposure levels of each cohort. A total of 35 SNVs were consistently associated with DNA damage levels among the three cohorts with pooled P values less than 1.00×10(-3) after adjustment for age, gender, smoking status and PM2.5 exposure levels, of which, 18 SNVs together with gender and PM2.5 exposure levels were independent factors contributing to DNA damage. Gene-based test revealed 3 genes significantly associated with DNA damage levels (P=5.11×10(-3) for POLH, P=2.88×10(-3) for RIT2 and P=2.29×10(-2) for CNTN4). Gene ontology (GO) analyses indicated that the identified variants were significantly enriched in DNA damage response pathway. Our findings highlight the importance of genetic variation as well as personal PM2.5 exposure in modulating individual DNA damage levels.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Particulate air pollution and circulating biomarkers among type 2 diabetic mellitus patients: The roles of particle size and time windows of exposure

Authors: Wang, C; Chen, R; Zhao, Z; Cai, J; Lu, J; Ha, S; Xu, X; Chen, X; Kan, H (2015) Environmental Research 140:112-118. HERO ID: 3012047

[Less] BACKGROUND: Short-term associations between size-fractionated particulate matter (PM) . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Short-term associations between size-fractionated particulate matter (PM) air pollution and circulating biomarkers are not well established, especially among diabetes patients.

METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal panel study involving 6 repeated measurements of 12 circulating biomarkers among 35 diabetes patients from April to June, 2013 in Shanghai, China. Real-time number and mass concentrations of PM with multiple size fractions between 0.25 and 10 μm were measured. Linear mixed-effect models were used to explore the associations between size-fractionated PM concentrations and blood biomarkers at different time windows.

RESULTS: Short-term exposure to PM was significantly associated with elevated levels of 5 biomarkers of inflammation, 3 biomarkers of coagulation and 1 vasoconstrictor. The effects varied considerably by particle size and time windows. Overall, PM with smaller size had stronger associations, and the most significant size fractions were 0.25-0.40 μm. Even 2 h exposure to PM can lead to a significant increase in biomarkers. The effects on biomarkers of inflammation and vasoconstriction were restricted to the first 12h after exposure, but the effects on coagulation persisted for 24-72 h. For example, an interquartile range increase in 2h average exposure to PM(0.25-0.40) was associated with 6-20% increase in biomarkers of inflammation, 19-38% in coagulation and 17% in vasoconstriction. PM had a stronger effect among male patients than female patients.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results provided important evidence on the roles of the size and time windows of exposure in the PM-mediated effects on circulating biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation and vasoconstriction in diabetes patients in China.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Short-Term Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Is Preferentially Associated With the Risk of ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Events

Authors: Pope, CA III; Muhlestein, JB; Anderson, JL; Cannon, JB; Hales, NM; Meredith, KG; Viet Le; Horne, BD (2015) Journal of the American Heart Association 4. HERO ID: 3254045

[Less] Background-Air pollution is associated with greater cardiovascular event risk, but the types of events . . . [More] Background-Air pollution is associated with greater cardiovascular event risk, but the types of events and specific persons at risk remain unknown. This analysis evaluates effects of short-term exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with risk of acute coronary syndrome events, including ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

Methods and Results-Acute coronary syndrome events treated at Intermountain Healthcare hospitals in urban areas of Utah's Wasatch Front were collected between September 1993 and May 2014 (N=16 314). A time-stratified case-crossover design was performed matching fine particulate matter air pollution exposure at the time of each event with referent periods when the event did not occur. Patients served as their own controls, and odds ratios were estimated using nonthreshold and threshold conditional logistic regression models. In patients with angiographic coronary artery disease, odds ratios for a 10-mu g/m(3) increase in concurrent-day fine particulate matter air pollution >25 mu g/m(3) were 1.06 (95% CI 1.02-1.11) for all acute coronary syndrome, 1.15 (95% CI 1.03-1.29) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 1.02 (95% CI 0.97-1.08) for non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, 1.09 (95% CI 1.02-1.17) for unstable angina, and 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.10) for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome events. Excess risk from fine particulate matter air pollution exposure was not observed in patients without angiographic coronary artery disease.

Conclusions-Elevated fine particulate matter air pollution exposures contribute to triggering acute coronary events, especially ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, in those with existing seriously diseased coronary arteries but not in those with nondiseased coronary arteries.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of genetic strain on stress-induced weight and body fat loss in rats: application to air pollution research

Authors: Johnstone, A; Phillips, P; Jarema, K; Dheyongera, G; Gordon, C (2014) HERO ID: 3008898


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The cardiopulmonary effects of ambient air pollution and mechanistic pathways: a comparative hierarchical pathway analysis

Authors: Roy, A; Gong, J; Thomas, DC; Zhang, J; Kipen, HM; Rich, DQ; Zhu, T; Huang, W; Hu, M; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Zhu, P; Lu, SE; Ohman-Strickland, P; Diehl, SR; Eckel, SP (2014) PLoS ONE 9:e114913. HERO ID: 2826903

[Less] Previous studies have investigated the associations between exposure to ambient air pollution and biomarkers . . . [More] Previous studies have investigated the associations between exposure to ambient air pollution and biomarkers of physiological pathways, yet little has been done on the comparison across biomarkers of different pathways to establish the temporal pattern of biological response. In the current study, we aim to compare the relative temporal patterns in responses of candidate pathways to different pollutants. Four biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, five biomarkers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, ten parameters of autonomic function, and three biomarkers of hemostasis were repeatedly measured in 125 young adults, along with daily concentrations of ambient CO, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, EC, OC, and sulfate, before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics. We used a two-stage modeling approach, including Stage I models to estimate the association between each biomarker and pollutant over each of 7 lags, and Stage II mixed-effect models to describe temporal patterns in the associations when grouping the biomarkers into the four physiological pathways. Our results show that candidate pathway groupings of biomarkers explained a significant amount of variation in the associations for each pollutant, and the temporal patterns of the biomarker-pollutant-lag associations varied across candidate pathways (p<0.0001) and were not linear (from lag 0 to lag 3: p = 0.0629, from lag 3 to lag 6: p = 0.0005). These findings suggest that, among this healthy young adult population, the pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress pathway is the first to respond to ambient air pollution exposure (within 24 hours) and the hemostasis pathway responds gradually over a 2-3 day period. The initial pulmonary response may contribute to the more gradual systemic changes that likely ultimately involve the cardiovascular system.