Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-PM (current)


4,357 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Air pollution-induced placental epigenetic alterations in early life: A candidate miRNA approach

Authors: Tsamou, M; Vrijens, K; Madhloum, N; Lefebvre, W; Vanpoucke, C; Nawrot, TS (In Press) Epigenetics. HERO ID: 3359719

[Less] Particulate matter (PM) exposure during in utero life may entail adverse health outcomes in later-life. . . . [More] Particulate matter (PM) exposure during in utero life may entail adverse health outcomes in later-life. Air pollution's adverse effects are known to alter gene expression profiles, which can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). We investigate the potential influence of air pollution exposure in prenatal life on placental miRNA expression. Within the framework of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, we measured the expression of six candidate miRNAs in placental tissue from 210 mother-newborn pairs by qRT-PCR. Trimester-specific PM2.5 exposure levels were estimated for each mother's home address using a spatiotemporal model. Multiple regression models were used to study miRNA expression and in utero exposure to PM2.5 over various time windows during pregnancy. The placental expression of miR-21 (-33.7%, 95% CI: -53.2 to -6.2, P=0.022), miR-146a (-30.9%, 95% CI: -48.0 to -8.1, P=0.012) and miR-222 (-25.4%, 95% CI: -43.0 to -2.4, P=0.034) was inversely associated with PM2.5 exposure during the 2(nd) trimester of pregnancy, while placental expression of miR-20a and miR-21 was positively associated with 1(st) trimester exposure. Tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was identified as a common target of the miRNAs significantly associated with PM exposure. Placental PTEN expression was strongly and positively associated (+59.6% per 5 μg/m³ increment, 95% CI: 26.9 to 100.7, P<0.0001) with 3(rd) trimester PM2.5 exposure. Further research is required to establish the role these early miRNA and mRNA expression changes might play in PM-induced health effects. We provide molecular evidence showing that in utero PM2.5 exposure affects miRNAs expression as well as its downstream target PTEN.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inhalation of fine particulate matter impairs endothelial progenitor cell function via pulmonary oxidative stress

Authors: Haberzettl, P; Conklin, DJ; Abplanalp, WT; Bhatnagar, A; O'Toole, TE (2018) Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 38:131-142. HERO ID: 4165772

[Less] OBJECTIVE: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution is associated . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution is associated with the depletion of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), as well as vascular injury and dysfunction. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether PM2.5 exposure leads to significant impairments in EPC function. Hence, we studied the effects of PM2.5 on EPC-mediated recovery of vascular perfusion after hindlimb ischemia and examined the mechanisms whereby PM2.5 exposure affects EPC abundance and function.

APPROACH AND RESULTS: In comparison with EPCs isolated from mice breathing filtered air, EPCs from mice exposed for 9 consecutive days (6 hours per day) to concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) had defects in both proliferation and tube formation. However, CAP exposure of mice overexpressing extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD-Tg) in the lungs did not affect EPC tube formation. Exposure to CAP also suppressed circulating EPC levels, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)-stimulated aortic Akt phosphorylation, and plasma NO levels in wild-type but not in ecSOD-Tg mice. EPCs from CAP-exposed wild-type mice failed to augment basal recovery of hindlimb perfusion when injected into unexposed mice subjected to hindlimb ischemia; however, these deficits in recovery of hindlimb perfusion were absent when using EPCs derived from CAP-exposed ecSOD-Tg mice. The improved reparative function of EPCs from CAP-exposed ecSOD-Tg mice was also reflected by greater expression of Mmp-9 and Nos3 when compared with EPCs from CAP-exposed wild-type mice.

CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to PM2.5 impairs EPC abundance and function and prevents EPC-mediated vascular recovery after hindlimb ischemia. This defect is attributed, in part, to pulmonary oxidative stress and was associated with vascular VEGF resistance and a decrement in NO bioavailability.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Fine particulate matters: The impact of air quality standards on cardiovascular mortality

Authors: Corrigan, AE; Becker, MM; Neas, LM; Cascio, WE; Rappold, AG (2018) HERO ID: 4165868

[Less] BACKGROUND: In 1997 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set the first annual National . . . [More] BACKGROUND: In 1997 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set the first annual National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Although the weight of scientific evidence has determined that a causal relationship exists between PM2.5 exposures and cardiovascular effects, few studies have concluded whether NAAQS-related reductions in PM2.5 led to improvements in public health.

METHODS: We examined the change in cardiovascular (CV) mortality rate and the association between change in PM2.5 and change in CV-mortality rate before (2000-2004) and after implementation of the 1997 annual PM2.5 NAAQS (2005-2010) among U.S. counties. We further examined how the association varied with respect to two factors related to NAAQS compliance: attainment status and design values (DV). We used difference-in-differences and linear regression models, adjusted for sociodemographic confounders.

FINDINGS: Across 619 counties, there were 1.10 (95% CI: 0.37, 1.82) fewer CV-deaths per year per 100,000 people for each 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5. Nonattainment counties had a twofold larger reduction in mean annual PM2.5, 2.1µg/m3, compared to attainment counties, 0.97µg/m3. CV-mortality rate decreased by 0.59 (95% CI: -0.54, 1.71) in nonattainment and 1.96 (95% CI: 0.77, 3.15) deaths per 100,000 people for each 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5 in attainment counties. When stratifying counties by DV, results were similar: counties with DV greater than 15µg/m3 experienced the greatest decrease in mean annual PM2.5 (2.29µg/m3) but the smallest decrease in CV-mortality rate per unit decrease in PM2.5, 0.73 (95% CI: -0.57, 2.02).

INTERPRETATION: We report a significant association between the change in PM2.5 and the change in CV-mortality rate before and after the implementation of NAAQS and note that the health benefits per 1µg/m3 decrease in PM2.5 persist at levels below the current national standard.

FUNDING: US EPA intermural research.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A county-level estimate of PM2.5 related chronic mortality risk in China based on multi-model exposure data

Authors: Wang, Q; Wang, J; He, MZ; Kinney, PL; Li, T (2018) Environment International 110:105-112. HERO ID: 4166581

[Less] BACKGROUND: Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution is currently a serious . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution is currently a serious environmental problem in China, but evidence of health effects with higher resolution and spatial coverage is insufficient.

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide a better overall understanding of long-term mortality effects of PM2.5 pollution in China and a county-level spatial map for estimating PM2.5 related premature deaths of the entire country.

METHOD: Using four sets of satellite-derived PM2.5 concentration data and the integrated exposure-response model which has been employed by the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) to estimate global mortality of ambient and household air pollution in 2010, we estimated PM2.5 related premature mortality for five endpoints across China in 2010.

RESULT: Premature deaths attributed to PM2.5 nationwide amounted to 1.27million in total, and 119,167, 83,976, 390,266, 670,906 for adult chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, and stroke, respectively; 3995 deaths for acute lower respiratory infections were estimated in children under the age of 5. About half of the premature deaths were from counties with annual average PM2.5 concentrations above 63.61μg/m3, which cover 16.97% of the Chinese territory. These counties were largely located in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and the North China Plain. High population density and high pollution areas exhibited the highest health risks attributed to air pollution. On a per capita basis, the highest values were mostly located in heavily polluted industrial regions.

CONCLUSION: PM2.5-attributable health risk is closely associated with high population density and high levels of pollution in China. Further estimates using long-term historical exposure data and concentration-response (C-R) relationships should be completed in the future to investigate longer-term trends in the effects of PM2.5.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Associations between mortality and prolonged exposure to elevated particulate matter concentrations in East Asia

Authors: Kim, SE; Bell, ML; Hashizume, M; Honda, Y; Kan, H; Kim, H (2018) Environment International 110:88-94. HERO ID: 4165913

[Less] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter . . . [More] Previous epidemiological studies regarding mortality and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of <10μm (PM10) have considered only absolute concentrations of PM10 as a risk factor. However, none have evaluated the durational effect of multi-day periods with high PM10 concentrations. To evaluate the durational effect (i.e., number of days) of high PM10 concentrations on mortality, we collected data regarding 3,662,749 deaths from 28 cities in Japan, South Korea, and China (1993-2009). Exposure was defined as consecutive days with daily PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3. A Poisson model was used with duration as the variable of interest, while controlling for daily PM10 concentrations, meteorological variables, seasonal trends, and day of the week. The increase in mortality risk for each additional consecutive day with PM10 concentrations ≥75μg/m3 was 0.68% in Japan (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.35-1.01%), 0.48% in South Korea (95% CI: 0.30-0.66%), and 0.24% in China (95% CI: 0.14-0.33%). The annual average maximum number of consecutive days with high PM10 in Japan (2.40days), South Korea (6.96days), and China (42.26days) was associated with non-accidental death increases of 1.64% (95% CI: 1.31-1.98%), 3.37% (95% CI: 3.19-3.56%), and 10.43% (95% CI: 10.33-10.54%), respectively. These findings may facilitate the planning of public health interventions to minimize the health burden of air pollution.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Geospatial hot spot analysis of lung cancer patients correlated to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and industrial wind in Eastern Thailand

Authors: Zhang, H; Tripathi, NK (2018) HERO ID: 4165060

[Less] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and . . . [More] Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer and is the major cause of death first among males and second among females in Thailand. Lung cancer is highly related to particulate matter (PM)-especially fine particulates with a diameter of 2.5 mu m or less (PM2.5). Recent studies have indicated a strong correlation between fine particulate matter (PM25) and lung function diseases. Therefore, this study aims to investigate and explore the phenomenon of lung cancer and its spatial correlation to mortality and PM2.5 in Eastern Thailand from 2008 to 2012 using multidisciplinary techniques. The cancer registry was utilized as data inventory and geographical information system (GIS), Global Moran's I, Getis-Ord G statistics, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) tool, Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA), and ordinary least square (OLS) methods to generate the PM2.5 maps to create hot spots in Eastern Thailand. The results visualize and analyze lung cancer hot spots and are adjusted for known factors such as sex and age of lung cancer patients. Choropleth maps of lung cancer incidence and mortality rates, generated for the first time, revealed that the number of male cancer patients is higher than that of females in Eastern Thailand. Global autocorrelation demonstrated considerable spatial clustering of lung cancer incidence and mortality. 91.56% of the lung cancer patients belonged to the age group of above 50 in both sexes. Significant relationships were found between the PM2.5 variable and the spatial patterns of lung cancer incidence and mortality. The Chonburi and Chanthaburi provinces were found to be the major hot spots for lung cancer incidence, which are close to industrial areas. These findings are useful in identifying the cancer registry information globally as well as locally. This study also provides a useful set of tools to identify and create hot spots in the developing countries where data and resources are major limitations. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Supplement: Disparities in Distribution of Particulate Matter Emission Sources by Race and Poverty Status

Authors: Mikati, I; Benson, AF; Luben, TJ; Sacks, JD; Richmond-Bryant, J (2018) American Journal of Public Health 1:e1-e6. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 4241047

[Less] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter (PM)-emitting facilities by the characteristics of the surrounding residential population and to illustrate various spatial scales at which to consider such disparities.

METHODS: We assigned facilities emitting PM in the 2011 National Emissions Inventory to nearby block groups across the 2009 to 2013 American Community Survey population. We calculated the burden from these emissions for racial/ethnic groups and by poverty status. We quantified disparities nationally and for each state and county in the country.

RESULTS: For PM of 2.5 micrometers in diameter or less, those in poverty had 1.35 times higher burden than did the overall population, and non-Whites had 1.28 times higher burden. Blacks, specifically, had 1.54 times higher burden than did the overall population. These patterns were relatively unaffected by sensitivity analyses, and disparities held not only nationally but within most states and counties as well.

CONCLUSIONS: Disparities in burden from PM-emitting facilities exist at multiple geographic scales. Disparities for Blacks are more pronounced than are disparities on the basis of poverty status. Strictly socioeconomic considerations may be insufficient to reduce PM burdens equitably across populations. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print February 22, 2018: e1-e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304297).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A cross-disciplinary evaluation of evidence for multipollutant effects on cardiovascular disease

Authors: Luben, TJ; Buckley, BJ; Patel, MM; Stevens, T; Coffman, E; Rappazzo, KM; Owens, EO; Hines, EP; Moore, D; Painter, K; Jones, R; Datko-Williams, L; Wilkie, AA; Madden, M; Richmond-Bryant, J (2018) Environmental Research 161:144-152. [Review] HERO ID: 4140291

[Less] BACKGROUND: The current single-pollutant approach to regulating ambient air pollutants . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The current single-pollutant approach to regulating ambient air pollutants is effective at protecting public health, but efficiencies may be gained by addressing issues in a multipollutant context since multiple pollutants often have common sources and individuals are exposed to more than one pollutant at a time.

OBJECTIVE: We performed a cross-disciplinary review of the effects of multipollutant exposures on cardiovascular effects.

METHODS: A broad literature search for references including at least two criteria air pollutants (particulate matter [PM], ozone [O3], oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide) was conducted. References were culled based on scientific discipline then searched for terms related to cardiovascular disease. Most multipollutant epidemiologic and experimental (i.e., controlled human exposure, animal toxicology) studies examined PM and O3 together.

DISCUSSION: Epidemiologic and experimental studies provide some evidence for O3 concentration modifying the effect of PM, although PM did not modify O3 risk estimates. Experimental studies of combined exposure to PM and O3 provided evidence for additivity, synergism, and/or antagonism depending on the specific health endpoint. Evidence for other pollutant pairs was more limited.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the evidence for multipollutant effects was often heterogeneous, and the limited number of studies inhibited making a conclusion about the nature of the relationship between pollutant combinations and cardiovascular disease.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Disparities in distribution of particulate matter emission sources by race and poverty status

Authors: Mikati, I; Benson, AF; Luben, TJ; Sacks, JD; Richmond-Bryant, J (2018) American Journal of Public Health e1-e6. HERO ID: 4241015

[Less] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: To quantify nationwide disparities in the location of particulate matter (PM)-emitting facilities by the characteristics of the surrounding residential population and to illustrate various spatial scales at which to consider such disparities.

METHODS: We assigned facilities emitting PM in the 2011 National Emissions Inventory to nearby block groups across the 2009 to 2013 American Community Survey population. We calculated the burden from these emissions for racial/ethnic groups and by poverty status. We quantified disparities nationally and for each state and county in the country.

RESULTS: For PM of 2.5 micrometers in diameter or less, those in poverty had 1.35 times higher burden than did the overall population, and non-Whites had 1.28 times higher burden. Blacks, specifically, had 1.54 times higher burden than did the overall population. These patterns were relatively unaffected by sensitivity analyses, and disparities held not only nationally but within most states and counties as well.

CONCLUSIONS: Disparities in burden from PM-emitting facilities exist at multiple geographic scales. Disparities for Blacks are more pronounced than are disparities on the basis of poverty status. Strictly socioeconomic considerations may be insufficient to reduce PM burdens equitably across populations. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print February 22, 2018: e1-e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304297).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The reduction of summer sulfate and switch from summertime to wintertime PM2.5 concentration maxima in the United States

Authors: Chan, EAW; Gantt, B; McDow, S (2018) Atmospheric Environment 175:25-32. HERO ID: 4386275

[Less] Exposure to particulate matter air pollution with a nominal mean aerodynamic diameter less than or equal . . . [More] Exposure to particulate matter air pollution with a nominal mean aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 gm (PM(2.)5) has been associated with health effects including cardiovascular disease and death. Here, we add to the understanding of urban and rural PM2.5 concentrations over large spatial and temporal scales in recent years. We used high-quality, publicly-available air quality monitoring data to evaluate PM2.5 concentration patterns and changes during the years 2000-2015. Compiling and averaging measurements collected across the U.S. revealed that PM2.5 concentrations from urban sites experienced seasonal maxima in both winter and summer. Within each year from 2000 to 2008, the maxima of urban summer peaks were greater than winter peaks. However, from 2012 to 2015, the maxima of urban summertime PM2.5 peaks were smaller than the urban wintertime PM2.5 maxima, due to a decrease in the magnitude of summertime maxima with no corresponding decrease in the magnitude of winter maxima. PM2.5 measurements at rural sites displayed summer peaks with magnitudes relatively similar to those of urban sites, and negligible to no winter peaks through the time period analyzed. Seasonal variations of urban and rural PM2.5 sulfate, PM2.5 nitrate, and PM2.5 organic carbon (OC) were also assessed. Summer peaks in PM2.5 sulfate decreased dramatically between 2000 and 2015, whereas seasonal PM2.5 OC and winter PM2.5 nitrate concentration maxima remained fairly consistent. These findings demonstrate that PM2.5 concentrations, especially those occurring in the summertime, have declined in the U.S. from 2000 to 2015. In addition, reduction strategies targeting sulfate have been successful and the decrease in PM2.5 sulfate contributed to the decline in total PM2.5.