Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-SOx


2,026 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Childhood obesity patterns and relation to middle-age sleep apnoea risk: The Bogalusa Heart Study

Authors: Bazzano, LA; Hu, T; Bertisch, SM; Yao, L; Harville, EW; Gustat, J; Chen, W; Webber, LS; Shu, T; Redline, S (In Press) . HERO ID: 3361355

[Less] BACKGROUND: Obese adults have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); however, . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Obese adults have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); however, the relationship between childhood obesity and adult OSA risk is unclear. Objectives This study aimed to examine overweight/obesity (OW) in childhood and risk of OSA in middle age.

METHODS: Childhood OW status was classified as never OW, weight cycling, persistent OW and incident OW. After 35 years of follow-up, high risk for OSA was determined by a positive score in ≥2 domains on the Berlin Questionnaire with obesity removed from scoring.

RESULTS: At initial assessment, mean (SD) age was 9.9 (2.9) years, and 23.9% were OW. Overall, 25.7% had scores indicating a high risk for OSA. Compared with participants who were never OW, those with persistent OW and incident OW were 1.36 (95%CI: 1.04-1.77) and 1.47 (1.11-1.96) times more likely to be high risk for OSA, after adjustment for multiple risk factors and adult OW status. Participants with an OW duration of 1-4 years, 5-8 years, and 8+ years were 0.96 (0.44-2.09), 1.20 (0.70-2.04) and 1.52 (1.22-1.90) times more likely to be high risk for OSA compared with those who were never OW (P for trend: 0.0002).

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that childhood OW is associated with a high risk of OSA in middle age.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Space-based detection of missing sulfur dioxide sources of global air pollution

Authors: McLinden, CA; Fioletov, V; Shephard, MW; Krotkov, N; Li, C; Martin, RV; Moran, MD; Joiner, J (In Press) Nature Geoscience. HERO ID: 3228432

[Less] Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. . . . [More] Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. When released into the atmosphere, sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid and fine particulate matter, secondary pollutants1 that have significant adverse effects on human health2, 3, 4, 5, the environment1 and the economy5. The conventional, bottom-up emissions inventories used to assess impacts, however, are often incomplete or outdated, particularly for developing nations that lack comprehensive emission reporting requirements and infrastructure. Here we present a satellite-based, global emission inventory for SO2 that is derived through a simultaneous detection, mapping and emission-quantifying procedure, and thereby independent of conventional information sources. We find that of the 500 or so large sources in our inventory, nearly 40 are not captured in leading conventional inventories. These missing sources are scattered throughout the developing world—over a third are clustered around the Persian Gulf—and add up to 7 to 14 Tg of SO2 yr−1, or roughly 6–12% of the global anthropogenic source. Our estimates of national total emissions are generally in line with conventional numbers, but for some regions, and for SO2 emissions from volcanoes, discrepancies can be as large as a factor of three or more. We anticipate that our inventory will help eliminate gaps in bottom-up inventories, independent of geopolitical borders and source types.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Fine Particulate Matter Constituents Associated with Cardiovascular Hospitalizations and Mortality in New York City

Authors: Ito, K; Mathes, R; Ross, Z; Nádas, A; Thurston, G; Matte, T (In Press) Environmental Health Perspectives. HERO ID: 1254851

[Less] Background: Recent time-series studies have indicated that both cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations . . . [More] Background: Recent time-series studies have indicated that both cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations were associated with particulate matter (PM). However, seasonal patterns of PM associations with these outcomes are not consistent, and PM components responsible for these associations have not been determined. We investigated this issue in New York City, where PM originates from regional and local combustion sources. Methods: We analyzed daily deaths and emergency hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among those aged 40+ for their associations with fine particle mass (PM2.5), its chemical components, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide for the years 2000-2006 using Poisson model adjusting for temporal/seasonal trends, temperature effects, and day-of-week. We estimated excess risks per inter-quartile-range increases at lag 0 through 3 days for warm (April-September) and cold (October-March) seasons. Results: The CVD mortality series exhibit strong seasonal trends, while the CVD hospitalization series show a strong day-of-week pattern. These outcome series were not correlated with each other but were individually associated with a number of PM2.5 chemical components from regional and local sources, each with different seasonal patterns and lags. Coal combustion-related components (e.g., selenium) were associated with CVD mortality in summer and CVD hospitalizations in winter, whereas elemental carbon and NO2 showed associations with these outcomes in both seasons. Conclusion: Local combustion sources, including traffic and residual oil burning, may play a year-round role in the associations between air pollution and CVD outcomes, but transported aerosols may explain the seasonal variation in associations shown by PM2.5 mass.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Integrated review plan for the secondary national ambient air quality standards for ecological effects of oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur and particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2017) (EPA-452/R-17-002). Research Triangle Park, NC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 4144170

[Less] The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently reviewing the air quality criteria and associated . . . [More] The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently reviewing the air quality criteria and associated secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur, and particulate matter (PM). In any such review, the purpose of the Integrated Review Plan (IRP) document is to communicate the current plan for the review, the process for conducting the review and key policy-relevant scientific and technical issues that will guide the review. In the context of the secondary standards for oxides of nitrogen, oxides of sulfur and PM, the scope for this IRP pertains to the protection of the public welfare from adverse effects related to ecological effects.

Archival Material
Archival Material

Section 3.4.3.1 references

Author: U.S. EPA (2017) HERO ID: 3981188

Abstract: References for a figure in ISA-SOx assessment

Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material for chapter 5 of the integrated science assessment for sulfur oxides

Author: U.S. EPA (2017) Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 3982386


Technical Report
Technical Report

Integrated science assessment for sulfur oxides: Health criteria

Author: U.S. EPA (2017) (EPA/600/R-17/451). Research Triangle Park, NC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment- RTP. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 4216110


Technical Report
Technical Report

Response to data question regarding: Ambient air pollution and emergency department visits for asthma: A multi-city assessment of effect modification by age

Author: Sarnat, SE (2016) HERO ID: 3350566


Archival Material
Archival Material

The panel study of income dynamics

Author: University of Michigan (2016) HERO ID: 3350568


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Acute impact of hourly ambient air pollution on preterm birth

Authors: Li, S; Guo, Y; Williams, G (2016) Environmental Health Perspectives 124:1623-1629. HERO ID: 3223998

[Less] BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is a major perinatal health problem but factors leading to . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is a major perinatal health problem but factors leading to it are still not completely understood.

OBJECTIVES: To identify the relation between acute increase in ambient air pollution in a few hours before onset of labour and the risk of preterm birth.

METHODS: We collected registered birth outcome data and hourly ambient air pollution measurements during 2009 ‒ 2013 in Brisbane, Australia. Using the time-stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression models with natural cubic splines, we assessed the shape of air pollution ‒ preterm birth curve, after controlling for potential confounders. We also examined the effect modification of other factors.

RESULTS: The association between air pollution [nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO)] and preterm birth was non-linear. Threshold concentrations for the mean of 0 ‒ 24 hours NO2, 24 ‒ 48 hours SO2, and 24 ‒ 48 hours CO before onset of labour were 7.6 parts per billion (ppb), 3.8 ppb, and 162.5 ppb, respectively. Increases in air pollution concentrations above thresholds were associated with increased risks of preterm birth. The ORs of preterm birth at 95th percentile of NO2, SO2 and CO against the thresholds were 1.17 (1.08, 1.27), 1.01 (0.99, 1.04), and 1.18 (1.06, 1.32), respectively. The associations were modified by demographic factors, for example, maternal smoking and socioeconomic status (SES).

CONCLUSION: Acute increases in ambient air pollution concentrations above certain levels before onset of labour may stimulate preterm birth.