Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


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1,526 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Childhood obesity patterns and relation to middle-age sleep apnoea risk: The Bogalusa Heart Study

Authors: Bazzano, LA; Hu, T; Bertisch, SM; Yao, L; Harville, EW; Gustat, J; Chen, W; Webber, LS; Shu, T; Redline, S (In Press) . HERO ID: 3361355

[Less] BACKGROUND: Obese adults have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); however, . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Obese adults have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA); however, the relationship between childhood obesity and adult OSA risk is unclear. Objectives This study aimed to examine overweight/obesity (OW) in childhood and risk of OSA in middle age.

METHODS: Childhood OW status was classified as never OW, weight cycling, persistent OW and incident OW. After 35 years of follow-up, high risk for OSA was determined by a positive score in ≥2 domains on the Berlin Questionnaire with obesity removed from scoring.

RESULTS: At initial assessment, mean (SD) age was 9.9 (2.9) years, and 23.9% were OW. Overall, 25.7% had scores indicating a high risk for OSA. Compared with participants who were never OW, those with persistent OW and incident OW were 1.36 (95%CI: 1.04-1.77) and 1.47 (1.11-1.96) times more likely to be high risk for OSA, after adjustment for multiple risk factors and adult OW status. Participants with an OW duration of 1-4 years, 5-8 years, and 8+ years were 0.96 (0.44-2.09), 1.20 (0.70-2.04) and 1.52 (1.22-1.90) times more likely to be high risk for OSA compared with those who were never OW (P for trend: 0.0002).

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that childhood OW is associated with a high risk of OSA in middle age.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Space-based detection of missing sulfur dioxide sources of global air pollution

Authors: McLinden, CA; Fioletov, V; Shephard, MW; Krotkov, N; Li, C; Martin, RV; Moran, MD; Joiner, J (In Press) Nature Geoscience. HERO ID: 3228432

[Less] Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. . . . [More] Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. When released into the atmosphere, sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid and fine particulate matter, secondary pollutants1 that have significant adverse effects on human health2, 3, 4, 5, the environment1 and the economy5. The conventional, bottom-up emissions inventories used to assess impacts, however, are often incomplete or outdated, particularly for developing nations that lack comprehensive emission reporting requirements and infrastructure. Here we present a satellite-based, global emission inventory for SO2 that is derived through a simultaneous detection, mapping and emission-quantifying procedure, and thereby independent of conventional information sources. We find that of the 500 or so large sources in our inventory, nearly 40 are not captured in leading conventional inventories. These missing sources are scattered throughout the developing world—over a third are clustered around the Persian Gulf—and add up to 7 to 14 Tg of SO2 yr−1, or roughly 6–12% of the global anthropogenic source. Our estimates of national total emissions are generally in line with conventional numbers, but for some regions, and for SO2 emissions from volcanoes, discrepancies can be as large as a factor of three or more. We anticipate that our inventory will help eliminate gaps in bottom-up inventories, independent of geopolitical borders and source types.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

An increased prevalence of self-reported allergic rhinitis in major Chinese cities from 2005 to 2011

Authors: Wang, X; Zheng, M; Lou, H; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Bo, M; Ge, S; Zhang, N; Zhang, L; Bachert, C (2016) Allergy 71:1170-1180. HERO ID: 3224117

[Less] BACKGROUND: The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) has increased worldwide in recent . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) has increased worldwide in recent decades. The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of self-reported AR and profiles of AR-related comorbidities in the adult population of China over time.

METHODS: This study surveyed residents of 18 major cities in mainland China. Telephone interviews were conducted with study participants after sampling target telephone numbers by random digital dialing. The questions asked during telephone interviews were based on those included in validated questionnaires, and focused on topics regarding allergic rhinitis, non-allergic rhinitis, acute/chronic rhinosinusitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis.

RESULTS: During 2011, a total of 47,216 telephone interviews were conducted, and the overall response rate was 77.5%. When compared with the AR prevalence in 11 cities surveyed in 2005, there was a significant increase in self-reported adult AR in eight of those cities (P < 0.01). In 2011, the standardized prevalence of self-reported adult AR in the 18 cities was 17.6%. The concentration of SO2 was positively correlated with the prevalence of AR (r = 0.504, P = 0.033). A multiple regression model showed that the absolute change in household yearly income was significantly associated with the change in prevalence of AR (R(2) = 0.68), after adjusting for PM10 , SO2 , NO2, temperature and humidity. The overall prevalences of NAR, ARS, CRS, asthma, and AD in the general population were 16.4%, 5.4%, 2.1%, 5.8%, and 14%, respectively.

CONCLUSION: During a 6-year period, there was a significant increase in the prevalence of self-reported AR in the general Chinese adult population. The incidence of AR being accompanied by rhinosinusitis, asthma or AD was significantly higher among individuals having self-reported AR compared with the general population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Acute impact of hourly ambient air pollution on preterm birth - Supplementary material

Authors: Li, S; Guo, Y; Williams, G (2016) Environmental Health Perspectives 124. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 3449404


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Associations of cough prevalence with ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitrogen and sulphur dioxide: A longitudinal study - Supplementary material

Authors: Anyenda, EO; Higashi, T; Kambayashi, Y; Nguyen, TT; Michigami, Y; Fujimura, M; Hara, J; Tsujiguchi, H; Kitaoka, M; Asakura, H; Hori, D; Yamada, Y; Hayashi, K; Hayakawa, K; Nakamura, H (2016) International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 3449401


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Symptom-trigger factors other than allergens in asthma and allergy

Authors: Claeson, AS; Palmquist, Eva; Lind, N; Nordin, S (2016) HERO ID: 3416961


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Deficiency of vitamin D and vitamin C in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma

Authors: Ginter, E; Simko, V (2016) HERO ID: 3400769


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Environmental and occupational particulate matter exposures and ectopic heart beats in welders

Authors: Cavallari, JM; Fang, SC; Eisen, EA; Mittleman, MA; Christiani, DC (2016) Occupational and Environmental Medicine 73:435-441. HERO ID: 3360181

[Less] OBJECTIVES: Links between arrhythmias and particulate matter exposures have been found . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: Links between arrhythmias and particulate matter exposures have been found among sensitive populations. We examined the relationship between personal particulate matter ≤2.5 µm aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) exposures and ectopy in a panel study of healthy welders.

METHODS: Simultaneous ambulatory ECG and personal PM2.5 exposure monitoring with DustTrak Aerosol Monitor was performed on 72 males during work and non-work periods for 5-90 h (median 40 h). ECGs were summarised hourly for supraventricular ectopy (SVE) and ventricular ectopy (VE). PM2.5 exposures both work and non-work periods were averaged hourly with lags from 0 to 7 h. Generalised linear mixed-effects models with a random participant intercept were used to examine the relationship between PM2.5 exposure and the odds of SVE or VE. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess whether relationships differed by work period and among current smokers.

RESULTS: Participants had a mean (SD) age of 38 (11) years and were monitored over 2993 person-hours. The number of hourly ectopic events was highly skewed with mean (SD) of 14 (69) VE and 1 (4) SVE. We found marginally significant increases in VE with PM2.5 exposures in the sixth and seventh hour lags, yet no association with SVE. For every 100 μg/m(3) increase in sixth hour lagged PM2.5, the adjusted OR (95% CI) for VE was 1.03 (1.00 to 1.05). Results persisted in work or non-work exposure periods and non-smokers had increased odds of VE associated with PM2.5 as compared with smokers.

CONCLUSIONS: A small increase in the odds of VE with short-term PM2.5 exposure was observed among relatively healthy men with environmental and occupational exposures.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Obstructive sleep apnoea in children with obesity

Authors: Kassim, R; Harris, MA; Leong, GM; Heussler, H (2016) Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 52:284-290. HERO ID: 3361356

[Less] AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict risk of obstructive . . . [More] AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in obese children, which could aid in prioritising sleep studies.

METHODS: A retrospective chart review was undertaken of obese children seen in the KOALA weight management clinic and Sleep clinic. Data collected included demographics, clinical history, examination findings, biochemical markers, and polysomnogram results.

RESULTS: Two hundred seventy-two obese children were seen in the KOALA clinic out of which 54 (20%) were also seen in the Sleep clinic because of snoring. Thirty-two were referred by the KOALA clinic; the remaining 22 were referred by other medical practitioners prior to being seen in the KOALA clinic. Thirty-nine had polysomnograms. The time from referral to Sleep clinic ranged from 10 days to 1.5 years with 50% seen within 6 months; with similar time gap between the blood tests and time of polysomnograms. Thirty-six percent (14/39) were reported to have OSA. Six children were Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) and all had OSA, which was statistically significant (P = 0.004). There was a statistically significant correlation between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and obstructive event index (OEI) in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. (r = 0.50, P = 0.04). Correlation between low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and OEI in REM was r = 0.36, P = 0.06, which approached significance.

CONCLUSIONS: Ethnicity was a significant factor with more obese ATSI children having OSA. The significant correlation between hs-CRP with OEI is consistent with findings of previous studies. Several factors (glycosylated haemoglobin, LDL) approached significance.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Sleep architecture and obstructive sleep apnea in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome: A case control study

Authors: Jalilolghadr, S; Yazdi, Z; Mahram, M; Babaei, F; Esmailzadehha, N; Nozari, H; Saffari, F (2016) Sleep and Breathing 20:845-851. HERO ID: 3361357

[Less] PURPOSE: Obesity and biochemical parameters of metabolic disorders are both closely . . . [More] PURPOSE: Obesity and biochemical parameters of metabolic disorders are both closely related to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to compare sleep architecture and OSA in obese children with and without metabolic syndrome.

METHODS: Forty-two children with metabolic syndrome were selected as case group and 38 children without metabolic syndrome were matched for age, sex, and BMI as control group. The standardized Persian version of bedtime problems, excessive daytime sleepiness, awakenings during the night, regularity and duration of sleep, snoring (BEARS) and Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaires were completed, and polysomnography (PSG) was performed for all study subjects. Scoring was performed using the manual of American Academy of Sleep Medicine for children. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, T test, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS: Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and N1 stage in the case group were significantly longer than the control group, while REM sleep was significantly shorter. Waking after sleep onset (WASO) was significantly different between two groups. Severe OSA was more frequent in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that severe OSA (OR 21.478, 95 % CI 2.160-213.600; P = 0.009) and REM sleep (OR 0.856, 95 % CI 0.737-0.994; P = 0.041) had independent association with metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS: Obese children with metabolic syndrome had increased WASO, N1 sleep stage, and severe OSA. But the results regarding sleep architecture are most likely a direct result of OSA severity. More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the association of metabolic syndrome and OSA.