Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-Ozone (2013)

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2,470 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Neighborhood poverty, urban residence, race/ethnicity, and asthma: Rethinking the inner-city asthma epidemic

Authors: Keet, CA; Mccormack, MC; Pollack, CE; Peng, RD; Mcgowan, E; Matsui, EC (2015) HERO ID: 2919634

[Less] BACKGROUND: Although it is thought that inner-city areas have a high burden of asthma, . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Although it is thought that inner-city areas have a high burden of asthma, the prevalence of asthma in inner cities across the United States is not known.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to estimate the prevalence of current asthma in US children living in inner-city and non-inner-city areas and to examine whether urban residence, poverty, or race/ethnicity are the main drivers of asthma disparities.

METHODS: The National Health Interview Survey 2009-2011 was linked by census tract to data from the US Census and the National Center for Health Statistics. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for sex; age; race/ethnicity; residence in an urban, suburban, medium metro, or small metro/rural area; poverty; and birth outside the United States, with current asthma and asthma morbidity as outcome variables. Inner-city areas were defined as urban areas with 20% or more of households at below the poverty line.

RESULTS: We included 23,065 children living in 5,853 census tracts. The prevalence of current asthma was 12.9% in inner-city and 10.6% in non-inner-city areas, but this difference was not significant after adjusting for race/ethnicity, region, age, and sex. In fully adjusted models black race, Puerto Rican ethnicity, and lower household income but not residence in poor or urban areas were independent risk factors for current asthma. Household poverty increased the risk of asthma among non-Hispanics and Puerto Ricans but not among other Hispanics. Associations with asthma morbidity were very similar to those with prevalent asthma.

CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of asthma is high in some inner-city areas, this is largely explained by demographic factors and not by living in an urban neighborhood.

Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

2013 ASHRAE handbook: Fundamentals

Author: ASHRAE (2013) HERO ID: 3554036


Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Chapter 16 - Ventilation and infiltration (TC 4.3, ventilation requirements and infiltration)

Author: ASHRAE (2013) HERO ID: 3554059


Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Chapter 13 - Indoor environmental modeling (TC 4.10, indoor environmental modeling)

Author: ASHRAE (2013) HERO ID: 3554053


Book/Book Chapter
Book/ Chapter

Chapter 24 - Airflow around buildings (TC 4.3)

Author: ASHRAE (2013) HERO ID: 3554069


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Air pollution and heart failure: Relationship with the ejection fraction

Authors: Dominguez-Rodriguez, A; Abreu-Afonso, J; Rodríguez, S; Juarez-Prera, RA; Arroyo-Ucar, E; Gonzalez, Y; Abreu-Gonzalez, P; Avanzas, P (2013) World Journal of Cardiology 5:49-53. HERO ID: 1519388

[Less] AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated . . . [More] AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated with hospital admission due to heart failure in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and reduced ejection fraction.

METHODS: We studied 353 consecutive patients admitted into a tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients with ejection fraction of ≥ 45% were classified as having heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and those with an ejection fraction of < 45% were classified as having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We determined the average concentrations of different sizes of particulate matter (< 10, < 2.5, and < 1 μm) and the concentrations of gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone) from 1 d up to 7 d prior to admission.

RESULTS: The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population was exposed to higher nitrogen dioxide concentrations compared to the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction population (12.95 ± 8.22 μg/m(3) vs 4.50 ± 2.34 μg/m(3), P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that nitrogen dioxide was a significant predictor of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (odds ratio ranging from (1.403, 95%CI: 1.003-2.007, P = 0.04) to (1.669, 95%CI: 1.043-2.671, P = 0.03).

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that short-term nitrogen dioxide exposure is independently associated with admission in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Ambient ozone concentrations and the risk of perforated and nonperforated appendicitis: A multicity case-crossover study

Authors: Kaplan, GG; Tanyingoh, D; Dixon, E; Johnson, M; Wheeler, AJ; Myers, RP; Bertazzon, S; Saini, V; Madsen, K; Ghosh, S; Villeneuve, PJ (2013) Environmental Health Perspectives 121:939-943. HERO ID: 1790950

[Less] BACKGROUND: Environmental determinants of appendicitis are poorly understood. Past . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Environmental determinants of appendicitis are poorly understood. Past work suggests that air pollution may increase the risk of appendicitis.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether ambient ground-level ozone concentrations were associated with appendicitis and whether these associations varied between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis.

METHODS: This time-stratified case-crossover study was based on 35,811 individuals hospitalized with appendicitis from 2004-2008 in 12 Canadian cities. Data from a national network of fixed-site monitors were used to calculate daily maximum ozone concentrations for each city. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate city-specific odds ratios (OR) relative to an interquartile range (IQR) increase in ozone adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. A random effects meta-analysis was used to derive a pooled risk estimate. Stratified analyses were used to estimate associations separately for perforated and nonperforated appendicitis.

RESULTS: Overall, a 16 ppb increase in the 7-day cumulative average daily maximum ozone concentration was associated with all appendicitis cases across the 12 cities (pooled OR=1.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.13). The association was stronger among patients presenting with perforated appendicitis for the 7-day average (pooled OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.36), when compared to the corresponding estimate for nonperforated appendicitis (7-day average: pooled OR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.09). Heterogeneity was not statistically significant across cities for either perforated or nonperforated appendicitis (p>0.20).

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that higher levels of ambient ozone exposure may increase the risk of perforated appendicitis.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Exploring prenatal outdoor air pollution, birth outcomes and neonatal health care utilization in a nationally representative sample

Authors: Trasande, L; Wong, K; Roy, A; Savitz, DA; Thurston, G (2013) Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology 23:315-321. HERO ID: 1521270

[Less] The impact of air pollution on fetal growth remains controversial, in part, because studies have been . . . [More] The impact of air pollution on fetal growth remains controversial, in part, because studies have been limited to sub-regions of the United States with limited variability. No study has examined air pollution impacts on neonatal health care utilization. We performed descriptive, univariate and multivariable analyses on administrative hospital record data from 222,359 births in the 2000, 2003 and 2006 Kids Inpatient Database linked to air pollution data drawn from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Aerometric Information Retrieval System. In this study, air pollution exposure during the birth month was estimated based on birth hospital address. Although air pollutants were not individually associated with mean birth weight, a three-pollutant model controlling for hospital characteristics, demographics, and birth month identified 9.3% and 7.2% increases in odds of low birth weight and very low birth weight for each μg/m(3) increase in PM(2.5) (both P<0.0001). PM(2.5) and NO(2) were associated with -3.0% odds/p.p.m. and +2.5% odds/p.p.b. of preterm birth, respectively (both P<0.0001). A four-pollutant multivariable model indicated a 0.05 days/p.p.m. NO(2) decrease in length of the birth hospitalization (P=0.0061) and a 0.13 days increase/p.p.m. CO (P=0.0416). A $1166 increase in per child costs was estimated for the birth hospitalization per p.p.m. CO (P=0.0002) and $964 per unit increase in O(3) (P=0.0448). A reduction from the 75th to the 25th percentile in the highest CO quartile for births predicts annual savings of $134.7 million in direct health care costs. In a national, predominantly urban, sample, air pollutant exposures during the month of birth are associated with increased low birth weight and neonatal health care utilization. Further study of this database, with enhanced control for confounding, improved exposure assessment, examination of exposures across multiple time windows in pregnancy, and in the entire national sample, is supported by these initial investigations.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Summertime cyclones over the Great Lakes Storm Track from 1860–2100: variability, trends, and association with ozone pollution

Authors: Turner, AJ; Fiore, AM; Horowitz, LW; Naik, V; Bauer, M (2012) HERO ID: 1322985


Technical Report
Technical Report

Analysis of recent U.S. ozone air quality data to support the O3 NAAQS review and quadratic rollback simulations to support the first draft of the risk and exposure assessment

Authors: Wells, B; Wesson, K; Jenkins, S (2012) HERO ID: 1323655

[Less] Ambient air quality information is an important element of the 03 NAAQS Health and Welfare Risk and . . . [More] Ambient air quality information is an important element of the 03 NAAQS Health and Welfare Risk and Exposure Assessments (REAs; U.S. EPA, 2012a, b), as well as the Policy Assessment (PA; U.S. EPA, 2012c). This memorandum provides information about the ambient 03 monitoring data, modeling data, and spatial fusion technique analyzed in both REAs, as well as information on the ambient 03 concentrations in locations and time periods of the health studies discussed in the PA.

In addition, this memorandum also provides information on the "quadratic rollback" method, which uses a quadratic equation to reduce high concentrations at a greater rate than low concentrations in simulations of just meeting the current 03 standard. In this review, quadratic rollback was used to simulate reductions in 03 concentrations in areas that did not meet the current 03 standard of 0.075 ppm (75 ppb). This memorandum discusses the application of the quadratic rollback to simulate just meeting the current standard in 12 case study areas for the Health REA (U.S. EPA, 2012a) and in the national-scale analysis for the Welfare REA (U.S. EPA, 2012b). An evaluation of the rollback approach is also discussed for the urban case study analysis, as well as the national-scale application.