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Methanol (Non-Cancer)

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  • 1.
    Book/Book Chapter
    Book/Book
    Chapter
    The Merck manual of diagnosis and therapy

    (1992) (16th). Rahway, NJ: Merck & Co..
    Tagged With: Cited in Final (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2011)

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  • 2.
    Book/Book Chapter
    Book/Book
    Chapter
    The role of glia in neurotoxicity

    (1996)
    Tagged With: Cited in Final (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2011)

    Details
       
  • 3.
    Book/Book Chapter
    Book/Book
    Chapter
    2000 TLVsĀ® and BEIsĀ®: based on the documentations of the threshold limit values for chemical substances and physical agents and biological exposure indices

    Author: ACGIH
    (2000) Cincinnati, OH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.
    Tagged With: Cited in Final (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2011)

    Details
       
  • 4.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Percutaneous methanol intoxication: Case report

    Authors: Adanir, J; Ozkalkanti, MY; Aksun, M
    (2005) European Journal of Anaesthesiology 22:560-561. [Abstract]
    Tagged With: Cited in Final (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Search 2012, WOS, ProQuest
  • 5.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Genetic polymorphisms of alcohol metabolizing enzymes

    Author: Agarwal, DP
    (2001)
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. Alcohol metabolism is one of the biological determinants that can significantly influence drinking behavior . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. Alcohol metabolism is one of the biological determinants that can significantly influence drinking behavior and the development of alcoholism and alcohol-induced organ damage. Most ethanol elimination occurs by oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, catalyzed principally by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Other ethanol oxidation pathways, including catalase and microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system (MEOS/CYP2E1), as well as the nonoxidative pathway (FAEES), which forms fatty acid ethyl esters, appear to play a minor role. The major alcohol metabolizing enzymes exhibit genetic polymorphism and ethnic variation. In this review recent advances in the understanding of the functional polymorphisms of ADH, ALDH and CYP2E1 and their metabolic, physiologic and clinical correlations are presented.
    Tagged With: Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in Final (2013)

    Details
       
  • 6.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Methanol intoxication-induced nigrostriatal dysfunction detected using 6-[18F]fluoro-L-dopa PET

    Authors: Airas, L; Paavilainen, T; Marttila, RJ; Rinne, J
    (2008) NeuroToxicology 29:671-674.
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. Ingestion of windshield washer liquid resulted with an acute severe methanol intoxication in a 49-year . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. Ingestion of windshield washer liquid resulted with an acute severe methanol intoxication in a 49-year old man. He developed optic atrophy with blindness, and an extrapyramidal syndrome. Putaminal injury and hyperintensity in the subcortical white matter was seen in a brain MRI. PET scanning with 6-[18F]fluoro-l-dopa confirmed symmetrical impaired presynaptic dopaminergic activity in the striatum, indicative of functional impairment of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. The striatal uptake was more markedly impaired in the putamina (40% of controls) than in the caudate nuclei (60% of controls). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an 18F-dopa PET scanning result in a case of an acute methanol poisoning.
    Tagged With: Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Search 2012, ToxNet, ProQuest, Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in Final (2013)
  • 7.
    Book/Book Chapter
    Book/Book
    Chapter
    Information theory and an extension of the maximum likelihood principle

    Author: Akaike, H
    (1973) In BN Petrov; F Csaki (Eds.), 2nd international symposium on information theory, Tsahkadsor, Armenia, USSR, September 2-8, 1971 (pp. 267-281). Budapest, Hungary: Akademiai Kiado.
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. In this paper it is shown that the classical maximum likelihood principle can be considered to be a . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. In this paper it is shown that the classical maximum likelihood principle can be considered to be a method of asymptotic realization of an optimum estimate with respect to a very general information theoretic criterion. This observation allows an extension of the principle to provide answers to many practical problems of statistical model fitting.
    Tagged With: Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in Final (2013)

    Details
       
  • 8.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Alternative excitotoxic hypotheses

    Authors: Albin, RL; Greenamyre, JT
    (1992) Neurology 42:733-738. [Review]
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. The concept of excitotoxicity, neuronal death produced by overstimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors, . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. The concept of excitotoxicity, neuronal death produced by overstimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors, has become a popular way of explaining the pathogenesis of neuronal death in a variety of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. While there is strong evidence supporting the role of excitotoxicity in acute processes such as hypoxia/ischemia and hypoglycemia, the role of excitotoxicity in chronic neurologic disease is not firmly established. To account for the inter- and intraregional variations in pathology of different neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest two modified forms of the excitotoxic hypothesis in which specific populations of neurons become more vulnerable to excitotoxic insult either by (1) possessing abnormal excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes or (2) being afflicted by any disease process that impairs cellular energy metabolism or otherwise decreases neuronal membrane potential. In these ways, excitotoxicity may be a final common pathway of neuronal death in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases.
    Tagged With: Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in Final (2013)
  • 9.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Dose-response assessment for developmental toxicity II: Comparison of generic benchmark dose estimates with no observed adverse effect levels

    Authors: Allen, BC; Kavlock, RJ; Kimmel, CA; Faustman, EM
    (1994) Fundamental and Applied Toxicology 23:487-495.
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTs) . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTs) or reference concentrations (RfDDTs) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs). The benchmark dose (BMD) has been proposed as an alternative basis for reference value calculations. A large database of 246 developmental toxicity experiments representing 1825 endpoints related to dead implants or malformed fetuses has been compiled for use in evaluating alternative approaches to developmental toxicity risk assessment. Using this database we have compared two approaches for BMD estimation with each other and with corresponding statistically derived NOAELs. Comparisons have been based on proportion of affected litters (litters with one or more affected offspring, a quantal response variable) and on the proportion of affected offspring within each litter (a continuous response variable). A quantal Weibull model was used to calculate generic BMDs for the quantal response variable (QBMDs) and a continuous power model was used to calculate generic BMDs for the continuous response variable (CBMDs) at three levels of additional risk (10, 5, and 1%). CBMD05s (continuous benchmark doses for 5% risk) and CNOAELs (statistically derived NOAELs based on the continuous response variable) were similar, with over 98% of the data subsets having CBMD05 and CNOAEL values that differed by less than an order of magnitude. In contrast, QNOAELs tended to be greater than corresponding QBMD10s. The observed conservatism of the QBMD values relative to the corresponding CBMD values was attributed to two factors, lower maximum likelihood estimates for the quantal model and wider confidence intervals around the maximum likelihood estimates, compared to the continuous model. Comparisons of different quantitative dose-response assessments for developmental toxicity experiments should help to identify appropriate risk assessment approaches for developmental toxicity risk assessment.
    Tagged With: Cited in External Review Draft (2011), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in Final (2013)
  • 10.
    The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
    Peer
    Reviewed
    Journal
    Article
    Dose-response assessment for developmental toxicity III: statistical models

    Authors: Allen, BC; Kavlock, RJ; Kimmel, CA; Faustman, EM
    (1994) Fundamental and Applied Toxicology 23:496-509.
    Minus Sign. Click to see only selected choices. Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of . . . Plus Sign. Click to expand choices. Although quantitative modeling has been central to cancer risk assessment for years, the concept of dose-response modeling for developmental effects is relatively new. The benchmark dose (BMD) approach has been proposed for use with developmental (as well as other noncancer) endpoints for determining reference doses and reference concentrations. Statistical models appropriate for representing the unique features of developmental toxicity testing have been developed and applied (K. Rai and J. Van Ryzin, 1985, Biometrics 41, 1-9; L. Kupper, C. Portier, M. Hogan, and E. Yamamoto, 1986, Biometrics 42, 85-98; R. Kodell, R. Howe, J. Chen, and D. Gaylor, 1991, Risk Anal. 11, 583-590). Generalizations of those models (designated the RVR, LOG, and NCTR models, respectively) account for the correlations among observations in individual fetuses or implant within litters; the potential for variables other than dose, such as litter size, to affect the probability of adverse outcome; and the possibility of a threshold dose below which background response rates are unaltered. The generalized models were applied to a database of 607 endpoints with significant dose-related increases in response rate. It was determined that the models were generally capable of fitting the observed dose-response patterns, with the LOG model appearing to be superior with respect to fit. A significant contributor to the ability of the LOG model to fit the data was its flexibility with respect to the representation of the dependence of response probability on litter size, a trait not shared by the other two models. Litter size appeared to be a significant covariable for predicting response rates, even when intralitter correlation was accounted for by assuming a beta-binomial distribution for the observations among individual fetuses. In contrast, a threshold dose parameter did not appear to be necessary to adequately describe the observed dose-response patterns. BMD estimates (corresponding to 5% additional risk) from all three models were similar to one another and to BMDs estimated from other, generic dose-response models (not specifically designed for developmental toxicity testing) that modeled average proportion of fetuses affected. The BMDs at the 5% level of risk were similar to no observed adverse effect levels determined by statistical tests of trend. Greater emphasis on and further examination of dose-response modeling for developmental toxicity testing are needed; biologically based approaches that consider the continuum of developmental effects induced in such tests should be encouraged.
    Tagged With: Cited in Final (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2013), Cited in External Review Draft (2011)
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Cited in Final (2013) (329)
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