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ISA-NOx

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1,867 References Were Found:

Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Table S5-2. Identification of airway responsiveness data in papers

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525886


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Traffic-related air pollution and noise and children's blood pressure: Results from the PIAMA birth cohort study

Authors: Bilenko, N; Rossem, LV; Brunekreef, B; Beelen, R; Eeftens, M; Hoek, G; Houthuijs, D; de Jongste, JC; Kempen, EV; Koppelman, GH; Meliefste, K; Oldenwening, M; Smit, HA; Wijga, AH; Gehring, U (2015) European Journal of Preventive Cardiology-2 22:4-12. HERO ID: 2234240

[Less] AIMS: Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later . . . [More] AIMS: Elevation of a child's blood pressure may cause possible health risks in later life. There is evidence for adverse effects of exposure to air pollution and noise on blood pressure in adults. Little is known about these associations in children. We investigated the associations of air pollution and noise exposure with blood pressure in 12-year-olds.

METHODS: Blood pressure was measured at age 12 years in 1432 participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study. Annual average exposure to traffic-related air pollution [NO2, mass concentrations of particulate matter with diameters of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and less than 10 µm (PM10), and PM2.5 absorbance] at the participants' home and school addresses at the time of blood pressure measurements was estimated by land-use regression models. Air pollution exposure on the days preceding blood pressure measurements was estimated from routine air monitoring data. Long-term noise exposure was assessed by linking addresses to modelled equivalent road traffic noise levels. Associations of exposures with blood pressure were analysed by linear regression. Effects are presented for an interquartile range increase in exposure.

RESULTS: Long-term exposure to NO2 and PM2.5 absorbance were associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, in children who lived at the same address since birth [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval) [mmHg] 0.83 (0.06 to 1.61) and 0.75 (-0.08 to 1.58), respectively], but not with systolic blood pressure. We found no association of blood pressure with short-term air pollution or noise exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution may increase diastolic blood pressure in children.

Technical Report
Technical Report

CASAC review of the EPA’s integrated science assessment for oxides of nitrogen – Health criteria (Second external review draft – January 2015)

Authors: Diez Roux; Frey, C (2015) (EPA-CASAC-15-001). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 3004780


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental figure S5-1 associations of NO2 with respiratory effects in copollutant models with PM10 PM10_25 SO2 O3

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525880


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Figure S5-2. Results of single-pollutant and copollutants models of short-term exposure to NO2 with and without PM and CVD HA

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525881


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Figure S5-3. Results of single-pollutant and copollutants models of short-term exposure to NO2 with CO and without CO and CVD HA

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525882


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Figure S5-4 Results of single-pollutant and copollutants models of short-term exposure to NO2 or NOX with and without O3 and hospital admissions CVD

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525883


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Figure S5-5 Results of single-pollutant and copollutants models of short-term exposure to NO2 or NOX with and without SO2 and hospital admissions CVD

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525884


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Table S5-1. Calculation of increments of oxides of nitrogen for standardizing epidemiologic effect estimates - short-term averages

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) HERO ID: 2525885


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Table S5-3. Studies of short-term exposure to oxides of nitrogen and respiratory hospital admissions and ED visits

Author: U.S. EPA (2015) [EPA Report] HERO ID: 2525887