Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP)

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The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Deproteinized natural rubber film forming polymeric solutions for nicotine transdermal delivery

Authors: Pichayakorn, W; Suksaeree, J; Boonme, P; Amnuaikit, T; Taweepreda, W; Ritthidej, GC (In Press) Pharm Dev Technol. HERO ID: 1332535

[Less] Film forming polymeric solutions were prepared from DNRL blended with MC, PVA, or SAG, together with . . . [More] Film forming polymeric solutions were prepared from DNRL blended with MC, PVA, or SAG, together with dibutylphthalate or glycerine used as plasticizers. These formulations were easily prepared by simple mixing. In a preliminary step, in situ films were prepared by solvent evaporation in a Petri-dish. Their mechanical and physicochemical properties were determined. The in vitro release and skin permeation of nicotine dissolved in these blended polymers were investigated by a modified Franz diffusion cell. The formulations had a white milky appearance, and were homogeneous and smooth in texture. Their pH was suitable for usage in skin contact. The mechanical property of in situ films depended on the ingredients but all compatible films were in an amorphous phase. The DNRL/PVA was shown to be the most suitable mixture to form completed films. The in vitro release and skin permeation studies demonstrated a biphasic release that provided an initial rapid release followed by a constant release rate that fitted the Higuchi's model. Nicotine loaded DNRL/PVA series were selected for the stability test for 3 months. These formulations needed to be kept at 4°C in tight fitting containers. In conclusion, film forming polymeric solutions could be developed for transdermal nicotine delivery systems.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Occurrence and Profiles of Phthalates in Foodstuffs from China and Their Implications for Human Exposure

Authors: Guo, Y; Zhang, Z; Liu, L; Li, Y; Ren, N; Kannan, K (In Press) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. HERO ID: 1311703

[Less] Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of . . . [More] Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of compounds is widespread. Nevertheless, studies on dietary exposure of humans to phthalates are limited. In this study, nine phthalate esters were analyzed in eight categories of foodstuffs (n = 78) collected from Harbin and Shanghai, China, in 2011. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BzBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were frequently detected in food samples. DEHP was the major compound found in most of the food samples, with concentrations that ranged from below the limit of quantification (LOQ) to 762 ng/g wet weight (wt). The concentrations of phthalates in food samples from China were comparable to concentrations reported for several other countries, but the profiles were different; DMP was found more frequently in Chinese foods than in foods from other countries. The estimated daily dietary intake of phthalates (EDI(diet)) was calculated based on the concentrations measured and the daily ingestion rates of food items. The EDI(diet) values for DMP, DEP, DIBP, DBP, BzBP, and DEHP (based on mean concentrations) were 0.092, 0.051, 0.505, 0.703, 0.022, and 1.60 μg/kg-bw/d, respectively, for Chinese adults. The EDI(diet) values calculated for phthalates were below the reference doses suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Comparison of total daily intakes, reported previously based on a biomonitoring study, with the current dietary intake estimates suggests that diet is the main source of DEHP exposure in China. Nevertheless, diet accounted for only <10% of the total exposure to DMP, DEP, DBP, and DIBP, which suggested the existence of other sources of exposure to these phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Assessment of organochlorine pesticides and plasticisers in the Selangor River basin and possible pollution sources

Authors: Santhi, VA; Mustafa, AM (In Press) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. HERO ID: 1332544

[Less] A study on the quality of water abstracted for potable use was conducted in the Selangor River basin . . . [More] A study on the quality of water abstracted for potable use was conducted in the Selangor River basin from November 2008 to July 2009. Seven sampling sites representing the intake points of water treatment plants in the basin were selected to determine the occurrence and level of 15 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), six phthalate esters (PAEs) and bisphenol A (BPA). Results indicated OCPs were still detected regularly in 66.1 % of the samples with the Σ(15)OCPs ranging from 0.6-25.2 ng/L. The first data on PAEs contamination in the basin revealed Σ(6)PAEs concentrations were between 39.0 and 1,096.6 ng/L with a median concentration of 186.0 ng/L while BPA concentration ranged from <1.2 to 120.0 ng/L. Although di-n-butyl phthalate was detected in all the samples, concentrations of di-ethyl(hexyl)phthalate were higher. Sampling sites located downstream recorded the highest concentrations, together with samples collected during the dry season. Comparison of the detected contaminants with the Department of Environment Water Quality Index (DOE-WQI) showed some agreement between the concentration and the current classification of stream water. While the results suggest that the sites were only slightly polluted and suitable to be used as drinking water source, its presence is cause for concern especially to the fragile firefly "Pteroptyx tener" ecosystem located further downstream.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental Boberg data for HERO ID 806135 from email communication

Author: Boberg, J (2016) Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 3102218

[Less] This material represents the individual male reproductive data from the journal article (obtained via . . . [More] This material represents the individual male reproductive data from the journal article (obtained via email communication with Dr. Julie Boberg):

Boberg, J; Christiansen, S; Axelstad, M; et al. (2010) Reproductive and behavioral effects of diisononyl phthalate (DINP) in perinatally exposed rats. Reproductive Toxicology. 2011 Feb; 31(2):200-9. [HERO ID 806135]

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Prenatal di-n-butyl phthalate exposure alters reproductive functions at adulthood in male rats

Authors: Giribabu, N; Sainath, SB; Reddy, PS (2014) Environmental Toxicology 29:534-544. HERO ID: 1249830

[Less] This study was aimed to investigate the reproductive health in adult male rats exposed to di-n-butyl . . . [More] This study was aimed to investigate the reproductive health in adult male rats exposed to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) during embryonic development. Pregnant rats were injected with DBP and F1 male rats were weaned and on postnatal day 100, used for mating with normal cycling females to assess reproductive performance. After completion of cohabitation period, rats were analyzed for other reproductive end points. Transplacental exposure to DBP significantly decreased fertility in adult male rats. Prenatal exposure to DBP significantly decreased sperm density, number of motile sperms, viable sperms, and hypoosmotic swelling tail coiled sperms with an increase in morphological abnormalities in sperms. Testicular steroidogenic enzyme activity levels and serum testosterone levels were significantly decreased in rats exposed to DBP during embryonic development. In conclusion, transplacental exposure to DBP impairs male reproductive performance by decreasing steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) exposure through diet in hospital patients

Authors: Cirillo, T; Fasano, E; Esposito, F; Montuori, P; Amodio Cocchieri, R (2013) Food and Chemical Toxicology. HERO ID: 1332531

[Less] Ready-to-eat packed meals intended to hospital patients were studied over a two-weeks period to measure . . . [More] Ready-to-eat packed meals intended to hospital patients were studied over a two-weeks period to measure the contents of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and to evaluate their daily intake by total diet. The packaging consisted of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dishes sealed with polypropylene (PP) foil. The DEHP mean concentrations in total meals varied from 0.061±0.028 to 0.307±0.138μg/gwetweight (wet wt.); the DBP mean levels varied from 0.025±0.018 to 0.174±0.091μg/gwetwt. Highest levels of concentration for DEHP and DBP were found in bread with mean values of 0.307±0.138μg/gwetwt. and 0.174±0.091μg/gwetwt. for DEHP and DBP, respectively. The daily intake for DEHP was 3.1±0.9μg/kgbw and 1.5±0.5μg/kgbw for DBP. The mean±sd incidence of DEHP and DBP intake via hospital meals on the respective EFSA TDI was 6±2% (range 4-11%), and 15±5% (range 8-24%), respectively. Even if for hospital patients the major route of exposure may be represented by medical devices, the influence of the diet could have a significant value on TDI.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A dose response study to assess effects after dietary administration of diisononyl phthalate (DINP) in gestation and lactation on male rat sexual development

Authors: Clewell, RA; Thomas, A; Willson, G; Creasy, DM; Andersen, ME (2013) Reproductive Toxicology 35:70-80. HERO ID: 1325348

[Less] Male rat sexual development was evaluated after dietary administration of 0, 760, 3800, 11,400ppm diisononyl . . . [More] Male rat sexual development was evaluated after dietary administration of 0, 760, 3800, 11,400ppm diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) and 7600ppm dibutyl phthalate (DBP) from gestation day (GD) 12 to postnatal day (PND) 14. Maternal weight was reduced on GD 20, PND 2 and 14 at 11,400ppm DiNP. Pup weight was reduced on PND 2 and 14 at 11,400 and 3800ppm DiNP. DBP induced multinucleated germ cells (MNGs) and Leydig cell aggregates (LCAs) in PND 2 testes. 7600ppm DBP reduced anogenital distance (AGD) on PND 2 and 14, and increased nipple retention and reproductive tract malformations on PND 49. DiNP induced MNGs (3800ppm) and LCAs (11,400ppm) on PND 2, and reduced AGD (11,400ppm) on PND 14. DiNP did not alter AGD, nipple retention or reproductive tract malformations on PND 49. Global endpoint analysis showed no evidence of a rat "phthalate syndrome" on PND 49 with DiNP administration.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Urine phthalates concentrations are higher in people with stroke: United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2001-2004

Author: Shiue, I (2013) European Journal of Neurology 20:728-731. HERO ID: 1290636

[Less] BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Associations between plastic-associated chemicals, such as bisphenol A, and . . . [More] BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Associations between plastic-associated chemicals, such as bisphenol A, and cardiovascular disease have begun to emerge in the current century. However, the relationship between urine phthalates and risk of stroke is unclear. It was aimed to study the relationship between urine phthalates concentrations and risk of stroke in a national population-based cross-sectional study.

METHODS: Data were retrieved from United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2001-2004 including demographics, self-reported medical conditions (stroke status) and urine phthalates concentrations. Analyses involved t-test and logistic regression models.

RESULTS: Of 13 phthalates concentrations, the mean values of mono-n-butyl phthalate (2001-2002: 131.27 ± 685.62 and 43.02 ± 117.70, P = 0.0001; 2003-2004: 114.36 ± 555.41 and 49.48 ± 153.53, P = 0.008) and mono-(3-carboxypropyl) phthalate (2001-2002: 13.60 ± 37.05 and 5.48 ± 10.55, P < 0.001; 2003-2004: 10.56 ± 38.37 and 5.94 ± 14.76, P = 0.038) concentrations were found significantly higher in people with stroke. It was also observed that low doses of mono-n-butyl phthalate (OR 1.0009, 95%CI 0.999-1.003, P = 0.266 in 2001-2002 and OR 1.0010, 95%CI 1.0001-1.0019, P = 0.028 in 2003-2004, respectively) and mono-(3-carboxypropyl) phthalate (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.00-1.05, P = 0.055 in 2001-2002 and OR 1.004, 95%CI 1.00-1.01 P = 0.240 in 2003-2004, respectively) were associated with higher risk of stroke after full adjustments.

CONCLUSIONS: Urine phthalates concentrations are potentially associated with increased risk of stroke, although the causality cannot be established in the current cross-sectional study design. Future longitudinal cohort studies and/or clinical trials are warranted to understand the biological mechanism along the pathway before drawing a firm conclusion on the relationship between phthalates and risk of stroke in humans.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Study on the influence of temperature, storage time and packaging type on di-n-butylphthalate and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate release into packed meals

Authors: Cirillo, T; Fasano, E; Esposito, F; Prete, ED; Cocchieri, RA (2013) Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A: Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment 30:403-411. HERO ID: 1332525

[Less] Ready-to-eat meals packed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and aluminium dishes, supplied to patients . . . [More] Ready-to-eat meals packed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and aluminium dishes, supplied to patients in two hospitals in the Campania region (Italy), were studied to evaluate the probable migration of di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) from the packaging into the food. The influence of temperature, storage time and type of package on the migration process was considered, analysing the meals according to three time ranges, before the packaging (T (0)) and after 60 min (T (1)) and 120 min (T (2)) from packaging during the storage in thermostatic delivery carts. At T (0) in the meals sampled before packaging in PET dishes, mean levels of DBP and DEHP were 0.023 ± 0.002 µg/g and 0.069 ± 0.041 µg/g, respectively; the DBP level increased 230% and that of DEHP increased 208% by time T (0) versus T (2). In the meals sampled before packaging (T (0)) in aluminium dishes, the mean levels of DBP and DEHP were 0.030 ± 0.001 µg/g and 0.057 ± 0.015 µg/g, respectively. The significant increase in contaminant levels over storage times for meals packed in PET dishes demonstrates that from packages made of plastic materials the migration of phthalic acid esters into foods is possible. In meals packed in PET dishes, the highest DBP and DEHP increases were observed in the T (0) to T (1) range, which represented the time interval over which meals were kept hot, and mainly in the first ones, where the highest temperatures have been recorded.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

In vitro assessment of thyroid hormone disrupting activities in drinking water sources along the Yangtze River

Authors: Hu, X; Shi, W; Zhang, F; Cao, F; Hu, G; Hao, Y; Wei, S; Wang, X; Yu, H (2013) Environmental Pollution 173:210-215. HERO ID: 1332522

[Less] The thyroid hormone disrupting activities of drinking water sources from the lower reaches of Yangtze . . . [More] The thyroid hormone disrupting activities of drinking water sources from the lower reaches of Yangtze River were examined using a reporter gene assay based on African green monkey kidney fibroblast (CV-1) cells. None of the eleven tested samples showed thyroid receptor (TR) agonist activity. Nine water samples exhibited TR antagonist activities with the equivalents referring to Di-n-butyl phthalate (DNBP) (TR antagonist activity equivalents, ATR-EQ(50)s) ranging from 6.92 × 10(1) to 2.85 × 10(2) μg DNBP/L. The ATR-EQ(50)s and TR antagonist equivalent ranges (ATR-EQ(30-80) ranges) for TR antagonist activities indicated that the water sample from site WX-8 posed the greatest health risks. The ATR-EQ(80)s of the water samples ranging from 1.56 × 10(3) to 6.14 × 10(3) μg DNBP/L were higher than the NOEC of DNBP. The results from instrumental analysis showed that DNBP might be responsible for the TR antagonist activities in these water samples. Water sources along Yangtze River had thyroid hormone disrupting potential.