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Arsenic Hazard ID

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The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phosphorus-arsenic interactions in variable-charge soils in relation to arsenic mobility and bioavailability

Authors: Bolan, N; Mahimairaja, S; Kunhikrishnan, A; Choppala, G (In Press) Science of the Total Environment. HERO ID: 1579241

[Less] Phosphorus (P) influences arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability which depends on the charge components . . . [More] Phosphorus (P) influences arsenic (As) mobility and bioavailability which depends on the charge components of soil. The objective of this study was to examine P-As interaction in variable-charge allophanic soils in relation to P-induced As mobilization and bioavailability. In this work, the effect of P on arsenate [As(V)] adsorption and desorption was examined using a number of allophanic and non-allophanic soils which vary in their anion adsorption capacity. The effect of P on As uptake by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants was examined using a solution culture, and a soil plant growth experiment involving two As-spiked allophanic and non-allophanic soils which vary in their anion adsorption capacity, and a field As-contaminated sheep dip soil. Arsenate adsorption increased with an increase in the anion adsorption capacity of soils. The addition of P resulted in an increase in As desorption, and the effect was more pronounced in the case of allophanic soil. In the case of both As-spiked soils and field contaminated sheep-dip soil, application of P increased the desorption of As, thereby increasing its bioavailability. The effect of P on As uptake was more pronounced in the high anion adsorbing allophanic than low adsorbing non-allophanic soil. In the case of solution culture, As phytoavailability decreased with increasing concentration of P which is attributed to the competition of P for As uptake by roots. While increasing P concentration in solution decreased the uptake of As, it facilitated the translocation of As from root to shoot. The net effect of P on As phytoavailability in soils depends on the extent of P-induced As mobilization in soils and P-induced competition for As uptake by roots. The P-induced mobilization of As could be employed in the phytoremediation of As-contaminated sites. However, care must be taken to minimize the leaching of As mobilized through the P-induced desorption, thereby resulting in groundwater and off site contamination.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Sparingly-soluble phosphate rock induced significant plant growth and arsenic uptake by Pteris vittata from three contaminated soils

Authors: Lessl, JT; Ma, LQ (In Press) Environmental Science and Technology. HERO ID: 1579280

[Less] We evaluated the potential of As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) to remove As from As-contaminated . . . [More] We evaluated the potential of As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) to remove As from As-contaminated soils over five harvests in 2.5 years in a field experiment. We tested the hypothesis that a P-limiting environment would enhance PV growth and As uptake owing its unique ability to take up P under As-rich environment. In Dec. 2009, PV was transplanted to three As-contaminated soils (pH of 5.5-7.2) containing 25 - 129 mg kg-1 As, which was amended with sparingly-soluble phosphate rock (PR-soil) or soluble P fertilizer (P-soil). During the 2.5-year, PV obtained sufficient P (1,882 vs. 2,225 mg kg-1) from PR-soils, attributing to its increase in root biomass (33%) and root exudation (53%) compared to P-soils. In addition, its frond biomass increased by 20% consecutively with each harvest (six month interval) from 18 to 36 g plant-1 and its frond biomass in PR-soils (52.2 g plant-1 year-1 or ~12 mt ha-1 year-1) averaged 39% more than that in P-soils. To our knowledge, this represented the largest PV frond biomass reported, demonstrating the effectiveness of PR in enhancing PV growth. In addition to biomass increase, PV in PR-soils took up ~1.5 times more As in fronds (2,540, 780, and 920 mg kg-1) than those from P-soils (1,740, 570, and 400 mg kg-1). The low available P in PR-soils induced substantial plant growth and As uptake by PV. This translated into significantly more As removal from soil, averaging 48% reduction in PR-soils and 36% in P-soils in 2.5 years. With multiple harvests and PR amendments, our results showed As removal by PV from contaminated soils was ~7 times faster than published studies.

Journal Article
Journal Article

One-pot synthesis of water-swellable Mg-Al layered double hydroxides and graphene oxide nanocomposites for efficient removal of As(V) from aqueous solutions

Authors: Wen, T; Wu, X; Tan, X; Wang, X; Xu, A (In Press) . HERO ID: 1519034

[Less] In this article, we reported a remarkably simple and efficient method for the preparation of layered . . . [More] In this article, we reported a remarkably simple and efficient method for the preparation of layered double hydroxides and graphene oxide (LDHs/GO) nanocomposites with varying GO amounts via a hydrothermal process. The graphene nature in the resulting LDHs/GO nanocomposites was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The LDHs/GO nanocomposites exhibited swelling behavior in water and forming a gel. The adsorption performance of the LDHs/GO nanocomposites was evaluated for the removal of arsenate (As(V)) from aqueous solutions, and the results showed that the ratio of GO to LDHs in the nanocomposites significantly affected the adsorption capacity. Higher and lower amounts of GO in LDHs/GO nanocomposites showed lower adsorption capacity of As(V). A maximum adsorption capacity of 183.11 mg/g (2.44 mmol/g) was achieved on the LDHs/GO containing 6.0% GO due to the higher BET surface area than other samples. Owing to their high uptake capability of As(V), water-swellable LDHs/GO nanocomposites are expected to have potential applications as adsorbents for As(V) polluted water cleanup.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Proteomic approach of adaptive response to arsenic stress in Exiguobacterium sp. S17, an extremophile strain isolated from a high-altitude Andean Lake stromatolite

Authors: Belfiore, C; Ordoñez, OF; Farías, ME (In Press) Extremophiles. HERO ID: 1519035

[Less] The North-Western part of Argentina is particularly rich in wetlands located in the Puna in an altitude . . . [More] The North-Western part of Argentina is particularly rich in wetlands located in the Puna in an altitude between 3,600 and 4,600 m above sea level. Most of these high-altitude Andean lakes are inhospitable areas due to extreme habitat conditions such as high contents of toxic elements, particularly arsenic. Exiguobacterium sp. S17, isolated from stromatolites in Laguna Socompa, exhibited remarkable tolerance to high arsenic concentration, i.e., it tolerated arsenic concentration such as 10 mM of As(III) and 150 mM of As(V). A proteomics approach was conducted to reveal the mechanisms that provide the observed outstanding resistance of Exiguobacterium sp. S17 against arsenic. A comparative analysis of S17, exposed and unexposed to arsenic revealed 25 differentially expressed proteins. Identification of these proteins was performed by MALDI-TOF/MS revealing upregulation of proteins involved in energy metabolism, stress, transport, and in protein synthesis being expressed under arsenic stress. To our knowledge, this work represents the first proteomic study of arsenic tolerance in an Exiguobacterium strain.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

Authors: Kurooka, H; Sugai, M; Mori, K; Yokota, Y (In Press) Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. HERO ID: 1519038

[Less] Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and . . . [More] Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Distribution of Colonization and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Chicken

Authors: Thibodeau, A; Fravalo, P; Garneau, P; Masson, L; Laurent-Lewandowski, S; Quessy, S; Harel, J; Letellier, A (In Press) Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. HERO ID: 1519047

[Less] Abstract Campylobacter jejuni is an important worldwide foodborne pathogen commonly found as a commensal . . . [More] Abstract Campylobacter jejuni is an important worldwide foodborne pathogen commonly found as a commensal organism in poultry that can reach high numbers within the gut after colonization. Although information regarding some genes involved in colonization is available, little is known about their distribution in strains isolated specifically from chickens and whether there is a linkage between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and colonization genes. To assess the distribution and relevance of genes associated with chicken colonization and AMR, a C. jejuni microarray was created to detect 254 genes of interest in colonization and AMR including variants. DNA derived from chicken-specific Campylobacter isolates collected in 2003 (n=29) and 2008 (n=28) was hybridized to the microarray and compared. Hybridization results showed variable colonization-associated gene presence. Acquired AMR genes were low in prevalence whereas chemotaxis receptors, arsenic resistance genes, as well as genes from the cell envelope and flagella functional groups were highly variable in their presence. Strains clustered into two groups, each linked to different control strains, 81116 and NCTC11168. Clustering was found to be independent of collection time. We also show that AMR weakly associated with the CJ0628 and arsR genes. Although other studies have implicated numerous genes associated with C. jejuni chicken colonization, our data on chicken-specific isolates suggest the opposite. The enormous variability in presumed colonization gene prevalence in our chicken isolates suggests that many are of lesser importance than previously thought. Alternatively, this also suggests that combinations of genes may be required for natural colonization of chicken intestines.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Short and long-term outcomes after esophagectomy for cancer in elderly patients

Authors: Tapias, LF; Muniappan, A; Wright, CD; Gaissert, HA; Wain, JC; Morse, CR; Donahue, DM; Mathisen, DJ; Lanuti, M (In Press) Annals of Thoracic Surgery. HERO ID: 1519066

[Less] BACKGROUND: As worldwide life expectancy rises, the number of candidates for surgical treatment of esophageal . . . [More] BACKGROUND: As worldwide life expectancy rises, the number of candidates for surgical treatment of esophageal cancer over 70 years will increase. This study aims to examine outcomes after esophagectomy in elderly patients. METHODS: Retrospective review of 474 patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer during 2002-2011. 334 (70.5%) patients were <70 years old (group A), 124 (26.2%) 70-79 years (group B) and 16 (3.4%) ≥80 years (group C). We analyzed the effect of age on outcome variables including overall and disease specific survival. RESULTS: Major morbidity was observed to occur in 115 (35.6%) patients of group A, 58 (47.9%) of group B and 10 (62.5%) of group C (p=0.010). Mortality, both 30- and 90-day was observed in 2(0.6%) and 7(2.2%) of group A, 4(3.2%) and 7 (6.1%) of group B, and 1(6.3%) and 2(14.3%) of group C, respectively (p=0.032 and p=0.013). Anastomotic leak was observed in 16(4.8%) patients of group A, 6(4.8%) of group B and 0(0%) of group C (p=0.685). Anastomotic stricture (defined by the need for ≥2 dilations) was observed in 76(22.8%) of group A, 13(10.5%) of group B and 1(6.3%) of group C (p=0.005). Five-year overall and disease specific survival was 64.8% and 72.4% for group A, 41.7% and 53.4% for group B, 49.2% and 49.2% for group C patients (p=0.0006), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Esophagectomy should be carefully considered in patients 70-79 years old and can be justified with low mortality. Outcomes in octogenarians are worse suggesting esophagectomy be considered on a case by case basis. Stricture rate is inversely associated to age.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Advection of surface-derived organic carbon fuels microbial reduction in Bangladesh groundwater

Authors: Mailloux, BJ; Trembath-Reichert, E; Cheung, J; Watson, M; Stute, M; Freyer, GA; Ferguson, AS; Ahmed, KM; Alam, MJ; Buchholz, BA; Thomas, J; Layton, AC; Zheng, Y; Bostick, BC; van Geen, A (In Press) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. HERO ID: 1519071

[Less] Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) by drinking shallow groundwater causes widespread disease in Bangladesh . . . [More] Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) by drinking shallow groundwater causes widespread disease in Bangladesh and neighboring countries. The release of As naturally present in sediment to groundwater has been linked to the reductive dissolution of iron oxides coupled to the microbial respiration of organic carbon (OC). The source of OC driving this microbial reduction-carbon deposited with the sediments or exogenous carbon transported by groundwater-is still debated despite its importance in regulating aquifer redox status and groundwater As levels. Here, we used the radiocarbon ((14)C) signature of microbial DNA isolated from groundwater samples to determine the relative importance of surface and sediment-derived OC. Three DNA samples collected from the shallow, high-As aquifer and one sample from the underlying, low-As aquifer were consistently younger than the total sediment carbon, by as much as several thousand years. This difference and the dominance of heterotrophic microorganisms implies that younger, surface-derived OC is advected within the aquifer, albeit more slowly than groundwater, and represents a critical pool of OC for aquifer microbial communities. The vertical profile shows that downward transport of dissolved OC is occurring on anthropogenic timescales, but bomb (14)C-labeled dissolved OC has not yet accumulated in DNA and is not fueling reduction. These results indicate that advected OC controls aquifer redox status and confirm that As release is a natural process that predates human perturbations to groundwater flow. Anthropogenic perturbations, however, could affect groundwater redox conditions and As levels in the future.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Expression of arsenic regulatory protein in Escherichia coli for selective accumulation of methylated arsenic species

Authors: Yang, T; Liu, J-W; Gu, C; Chen, M-L; Wang, J-H (In Press) . HERO ID: 1519072

[Less] ArsR is a metalloregulatory protein with high selectivity and affinity toward arsenic. We hereby report . . . [More] ArsR is a metalloregulatory protein with high selectivity and affinity toward arsenic. We hereby report the expression of ArsR in Escherichia coli by cell engineering, which significantly enhances the adsorption/accumulation capacity of methylated arsenic species. The ArsR-expressed E. coli cells (denoted as E. coli-ArsR ) give rise to 5.6-fold and 3.4-fold improvements on the adsorption/accumulation capacity for monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), with respect to native E. coli cells. The uptake of MMA and DMA by the E. coli-ArsR is a fast process fitting Langmuir adsorption model. It is interesting to note that the accumulation of methylated arsenic is virtually not affected by the presence of competing heavy-metal species, at least 10 times of Cd(II) and Pb(II) are tolerated for the adsorption of 1 mg L(-1) methylated arsenic. In addition, an ionic strength of up to 2 g L(-1) Na(+) poses no obvious effect on the sorption of 1 mg L(-1) MMA and DMA. Furthermore, the accumulation of MMA and DMA is less sensitive to the variation of pH value, with respect to the blank control cells. Consequently, 82.4% of MMA and 96.3% of DMA at a concentration of 50 μg L(-1) could be readily removed from aqueous medium by 12 g L(-1) of E. coli-ArsR . This illustrates a great potential for the E. coli-ArsR for selective remediation of methylated arsenic species in waters, even in the presence of a high concentration of salts.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Arsenite elicits anomalous sulfur starvation responses in barley

Authors: Reid, R; Gridley, K; Kawamata, Y; Zhu, Y (In Press) Plant Physiology. HERO ID: 1519073

[Less] Treatment of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings with arsenite (AsIII) rapidly induced physiological . . . [More] Treatment of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings with arsenite (AsIII) rapidly induced physiological and transcriptional changes characteristic of S deficiency, even in plants replete with S. AsIII and S deficiency induced 5 - 20 fold increases in the three genes responsible for sulfate reduction. Both treatments also caused upregulation of a sulfate transporter, but only in the case of S deficiency was there an increase in sulfate influx. Longer term changes included reduction in transfer of S from roots to shoots, and an increase in root growth relative to shoot growth. Genes involved in complexation and compartmentation of As were upregulated by AsIII but not by S-deficiency. The rate at which As accumulated appeared to be controlled by the rate of thiol synthesis. Over a range of AsIII concentrations and growth periods, the ratio of thiols to As was always close to 3:1, which is consistent with the formation of a stable GS3:AsIII complex.The greater toxicity of As under S-limiting conditions is likely to be due to an intensification of S deficiency as a result of thiol synthesis rather than to a direct toxicity to metabolism. Since influx of AsIII was nearly 20-fold faster than the rate of synthesis of thiols, it is questionable whether this complexation strategy can be effective in preventing As toxicity unless As uptake becomes limited by diffusive resistances in the rhizosphere.