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Arsenic Hazard ID

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The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

An arsenic-contaminated field trial to assess the uptake and translocation of arsenic by genotypes of rice

Authors: Lei, M; Tie, B; Zeng, M; Qing, P; Song, Z; Williams, PN; Huang, Y (In Press) Environmental Geochemistry and Health. HERO ID: 1337505

[Less] Compared to other cereals, rice has particular strong As accumulation. Therefore, it is very important . . . [More] Compared to other cereals, rice has particular strong As accumulation. Therefore, it is very important to understand As uptake and translocation among different genotypes. A field study in Chenzhou city, Hunan province of China, was employed to evaluate the effect of arsenic-contaminated soil on uptake and distribution in 34 genotypes of rice (including unpolished rice, husk, shoot, and root). The soil As concentrations ranged from 52.49 to 83.86 mg kg(-1), with mean As concentration 64.44 mg kg(-1). The mean As concentrations in rice plant tissues were different among the 34 rice genotypes. The highest As concentrations were accumulated in rice root (196.27-385.98 mg kg(-1) dry weight), while the lowest was in unpolished rice (0.31-0.52 mg kg(-1) dry weight). The distribution of As in rice tissue and paddy soil are as follows root ≫ soil > shoot > husk > unpolished rice. The ranges of concentrations of inorganic As in all of unpolished rice were from 0.26 to 0.52 mg kg(-1) dry weight. In particular, the percentage of inorganic As in the total As was more than 67 %, indicating that the inorganic As was the predominant species in unpolished rice. The daily dietary intakes of inorganic As in unpolished rice ranged from 0.10 to 0.21 mg for an adult, and from 0.075 to 0.15 mg for a child. Comparison with tolerable daily intakes established by FAO/WHO, inorganic As in most of unpolished rice samples exceeded the recommended intake values. The 34 genotypes of rice were classified into four clusters using a criteria value of rescaled distance between 5 and 10. Among the 34 genotypes, the genotypes II you 416 (II416) with the lowest enrichment of As and the lowest daily dietary intakes of inorganic As could be selected as the main cultivar in As-contaminated field.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Association of arsenic levels in soil and water with urinary arsenic concentration of residents in the vicinity of closed metal mines

Authors: Cho, Y; Seo, S; Choi, S-H; Lee, S; Kim, K; Kim, H-J; Choi, J-W (In Press) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health. HERO ID: 1248978

[Less] Arsenic (As) pollution in the surroundings of metal mines has been observed, and may induce serious . . . [More] Arsenic (As) pollution in the surroundings of metal mines has been observed, and may induce serious health problems, in particular cancer. Health hazard attributed to As in contaminated soil and water in the vicinity of closed or abandoned metal mines may be high. Little is known about how environmental exposure to As has affected the health of resident near closed metal mines. The objectives of this study were to compare the urinary level of As for those living near closed metal mines (the exposed group) with that of non-exposed group; and to investigate the correlation between As levels in soil (Soil(As)) and water (Water(As)) and the urinary levels (Urine(As)) of residents in the exposed group. Data for Soil(As) and Water(As) were obtained from the national environmental survey performed between 2003 and 2005 by the Ministry of Environment in Korea. To measure Urine(As), 2674 and 237 subjects were selected from 67 closed metal mines (exposed areas) and two rural areas (non-exposed areas), respectively. Five milliliters of urine samples were taken, and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Urine(As). Of all the exposed areas, high Soil(As) and Water(As) areas that exceed the Korean standards of As in soil (6mg/kg-soil) and stream or groundwater (0.05mg/l-water) were classified to evaluate the health risks in high polluted areas. Also, high Urine(As) group was defined as 20μg/g creatinine or more. Student's t-test was performed to compare the Urine(As) level between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated by a logistic analysis to evaluate the risk for high Urine(As) level from high Soil(As) and Water(As) areas. The mean of urinary As were 8.90±8.34μg/g-creatinine for the exposed group and 7.68±4.98μg/g creatinine for the non-exposed group, respectively; and the significant difference of urinary As level was observed between both groups (p<0.05). Moreover, the means for urinary As of people in areas with high As level in soil and water were significantly higher than that for the control areas (p<0.001), and these differences were more pronounced for the As level in water. The odds of subjects with high Urine(As) were positively and significantly associated with living in the areas with high As level in soil (OR=1.62; 95% C.I.=1.13-2.31). These associations were much stronger for the areas with high Water(As) (OR=3.79; 95% C.I.=2.32-6.19). These results indicate that the high level of As in environment may increase the risk of having high urinary As level of people in the exposed areas.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Optimal time interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

Authors: Sloothaak, DAM; Geijsen, DE; van Leersum, NJ; Punt, CJA; Buskens, CJ; Bemelman, WA; Tanis, PJ; Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (In Press) British Journal of Surgery. HERO ID: 1519025

[Less] BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been proven to increase local control in rectal . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been proven to increase local control in rectal cancer, but the optimal interval between CRT and surgery is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse the influence of variations in clinical practice regarding timing of surgery on pathological response at a population level. METHODS: All evaluable patients who underwent preoperative CRT for rectal cancer between 2009 and 2011 were selected from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit. The interval between radiotherapy and surgery was calculated from the start of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR; pathological status after chemoradiotherapy (yp) T0 N0). RESULTS: A total of 1593 patients were included. The median interval between radiotherapy and surgery was 14 (range 6-85, interquartile range 12-16) weeks. Outcome measures were calculated for intervals of less than 13 weeks (312 patients), 13-14 weeks (511 patients), 15-16 weeks (406 patients) and more than 16 weeks (364 patients). Age, tumour location and R0 resection rate were distributed equally between the four groups; significant differences were found for clinical tumour category (cT4: 17·3, 18·4, 24·5 and 26·6 per cent respectively; P = 0·010) and clinical metastasis category (cM1: 4·4, 4·8, 8·9 and 14·9 per cent respectively; P < 0·001). Resection 15-16 weeks after the start of CRT resulted in the highest pCR rate (18·0 per cent; P = 0·013), with an independent association (hazard ratio 1·63, 95 per cent confidence interval 1·20 to 2·23). Results for secondary endpoints in the group with an interval of 15-16 weeks were: tumour downstaging, 55·2 per cent (P = 0·165); nodal downstaging, 58·6 per cent (P = 0·036); and (near)-complete response, 23·2 per cent (P = 0·124). CONCLUSION: Delaying surgery until the 15th or 16th week after the start of CRT (10-11 weeks from the end of CRT) seemed to result in the highest chance of a pCR.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mitochondrial hormesis links low-dose arsenite exposure to lifespan extension

Authors: Schmeisser, S; Schmeisser, K; Weimer, S; Groth, M; Priebe, S; Fazius, E; Kuhlow, D; Pick, D; Einax, JW; Guthke, R; Platzer, M; Zarse, K; Ristow, M (In Press) Aging Cell. HERO ID: 1519026

[Less] Arsenite is one of the most toxic chemical substances known and is assumed to exert detrimental effects . . . [More] Arsenite is one of the most toxic chemical substances known and is assumed to exert detrimental effects on viability even at lowest concentrations. By contrast and unlike higher concentrations, we here find that exposure to low-dose arsenite promotes growth of cultured mammalian cells. In the nematode C. elegans, low-dose arsenite promotes resistance against thermal and chemical stressors, and extends lifespan of this metazoan, whereas higher concentrations reduce longevity. While arsenite causes a transient increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in C. elegans, co-exposure to ROS scavengers prevents the lifespan-extending capabilities of arsenite, indicating that transiently increased ROS levels act as transducers of arsenite effects on lifespan, a process known as mitohormesis. This requires two transcription factors, namely DAF-16 and SKN-1, which employ the metallothionein MTL-2 as well as the mitochondrial transporter TIN-9.1 to extend life span. Taken together, low-dose arsenite extends lifespan, providing evidence for non-linear dose-response characteristics of toxin-mediated stress resistance and longevity in a multicellular organism. © 2013 The Authors Aging Cell © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Soil chemistry and pollution study of a closed landfill site at Ampar Tenang, Selangor, Malaysia

Authors: Mohd Adnan, SNSB; Yusoff, S; Chua, YP (In Press) . HERO ID: 1519032

[Less] A total of 20 landfills are located in State of Selangor, Malaysia. This includes the Ampar Tenang landfill . . . [More] A total of 20 landfills are located in State of Selangor, Malaysia. This includes the Ampar Tenang landfill site, which was closed on 26 January 2010. It was reported that the landfill has been upgraded to a level I type of sanitary classification. However, the dumpsite area is not being covered according to the classification. In addition, municipal solid waste was dumped directly on top of the unlined natural alluvium formation. This does not only contaminate surface and subsurface soils, but also initiates the potential risk of groundwater pollution. Based on previous studies, the Ampar Tenang soil has been proven to no longer be capable of preventing pollution migration. In this study, metal concentrations of soil samples up to 30 m depth were analyzed based on statistical analysis. It is very significant because research of this type has not been carried out before. The subsurface soils were significantly polluted by arsenic (As), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al). As and Pb exceeded the safe limit values of 5.90 mg/kg and 31.00 mg/kg, respectively, based on Provincial Sediment Quality Guidelines for Metals and the Interim Sediment Quality Values. Furthermore, only Cu concentrations showed a significantly decreasing trend with increasing depth. Most metals were found on clay-type soils based on the cluster analysis method. Moreover, the analysis also differentiates two clusters: cluster I-Pb, As, zinc, Cu, manganese, calcium, sodium, magnesium, potassium and Fe; cluster II-Al. Different clustering may suggest a different contamination source of metals.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

Authors: Kurooka, H; Sugai, M; Mori, K; Yokota, Y (In Press) Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. HERO ID: 1519038

[Less] Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and . . . [More] Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity in hyperthyroid cats with and without concurrent hypertension

Authors: Williams, TL; Elliott, J; Syme, HM (In Press) . HERO ID: 1519044

[Less] BACKGROUND: Hypertension is present in some hyperthyroid cats at diagnosis or can develop after treatment . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Hypertension is present in some hyperthyroid cats at diagnosis or can develop after treatment for hyperthyroidism. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) could be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. HYPOTHESIS: Hyperthyroid cats that develop hypertension before or after treatment for hyperthyroidism will have greater RAAS activation than normotensive cats. ANIMALS: Ninety-nine hyperthyroid cats. METHODS: Retrospective case-control study. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) were measured in untreated hyperthyroid hypertensive cats (HT-Pre group), initially normotensive hyperthyroid cats that develop hypertension after treatment (HT-Post group), and hyperthyroid cats that are normotensive (NT group). Data are presented as median [25th, 75th percentile]. RESULTS: Baseline PRA was not significantly different among the 3 groups (HT-Pre group 1.50 [0.05, 2.37] ng/mL/h, HT-Post group 0.66 [0.17, 2.31] ng/mL/h, NT group 1.11 [0.57, 2.18] ng/mL/h; P = .44). PRA decreased significantly after treatment in the NT group (1.09 [0.53, 2.47] versus 0.22 [0.05, 0.76] ng/mL/h; P < .001) and the HT-Post group (0.71 [0.17, 2.33] versus 0.28 [0.07, 0.57] ng/mL/h; P = .006). Baseline PAC was not significantly different among the 3 groups (HT-Pre group 72.2 [40.0, 145.6] pg/mL, HT-Post group 69.7 [43.3, 142.6] pg/mL, NT group 109.0 [68.2, 184.6] pg/mL; P = .10). PAC decreased significantly after treatment in the NT group (114.4 [56.6, 204.1] versus 59.5 [32.4, 98.2] pg/mL; P < .001) but did not change significantly in the HT-Post group (61.2 [44.9, 124.0] versus 58.4 [42.0, 97.7] pg/mL; P = .59). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: RAAS activation occurs in hyperthyroid cats, but is not associated with the development of hypertension. PAC is not influenced by changes in PRA in hyperthyroid cats that develop hypertension after treatment, perhaps indicating RAAS dysfunction in these cats.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Distribution of Colonization and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni Isolated from Chicken

Authors: Thibodeau, A; Fravalo, P; Garneau, P; Masson, L; Laurent-Lewandowski, S; Quessy, S; Harel, J; Letellier, A (In Press) Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. HERO ID: 1519047

[Less] Abstract Campylobacter jejuni is an important worldwide foodborne pathogen commonly found as a commensal . . . [More] Abstract Campylobacter jejuni is an important worldwide foodborne pathogen commonly found as a commensal organism in poultry that can reach high numbers within the gut after colonization. Although information regarding some genes involved in colonization is available, little is known about their distribution in strains isolated specifically from chickens and whether there is a linkage between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and colonization genes. To assess the distribution and relevance of genes associated with chicken colonization and AMR, a C. jejuni microarray was created to detect 254 genes of interest in colonization and AMR including variants. DNA derived from chicken-specific Campylobacter isolates collected in 2003 (n=29) and 2008 (n=28) was hybridized to the microarray and compared. Hybridization results showed variable colonization-associated gene presence. Acquired AMR genes were low in prevalence whereas chemotaxis receptors, arsenic resistance genes, as well as genes from the cell envelope and flagella functional groups were highly variable in their presence. Strains clustered into two groups, each linked to different control strains, 81116 and NCTC11168. Clustering was found to be independent of collection time. We also show that AMR weakly associated with the CJ0628 and arsR genes. Although other studies have implicated numerous genes associated with C. jejuni chicken colonization, our data on chicken-specific isolates suggest the opposite. The enormous variability in presumed colonization gene prevalence in our chicken isolates suggests that many are of lesser importance than previously thought. Alternatively, this also suggests that combinations of genes may be required for natural colonization of chicken intestines.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Advantages of low pH and limited oxygenation in arsenite removal from water by zero-valent iron

Authors: Klas, S; Kirk, DW (In Press) Journal of Hazardous Materials. HERO ID: 1519061

[Less] The removal of toxic arsenic species from contaminated waters by zero-valent iron (ZVI) has drawn considerable . . . [More] The removal of toxic arsenic species from contaminated waters by zero-valent iron (ZVI) has drawn considerable attention in recent years. In this approach, arsenic ions are mainly removed by adsorption to the iron corrosion products. Reduction to zero-valent arsenic on the ZVI surface is possible in the absence of competing oxidants and can reduce arsenic mobility and sludge formation. However, associated removal rates are relatively low. In the current study, simultaneous high reduction and removal rates of arsenite (H3AsO3), the more toxic and mobile environmentally occurring arsenic species, was demonstrated by reacting it with ZVI under limited aeration and relatively low pH. 90% of the removed arsenic was attached to the ZVI particles and 60% of which was in the elemental state. Under the same non-acidic conditions, only 40-60% of the removed arsenic was attached to the ZVI with no change in arsenic oxidation state. Under anaerobic conditions, reduction occurred but total arsenic removal rate was significantly lower and ZVI demand was higher. The effective arsenite removal under acidic oxygen-limited conditions was explained by formation of Fe(II)-solid intermediate on the ZVI surface that provided high surface area and reducing power.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Optimization of bioleaching conditions for metal removal from CCA-treated wood by using an unknown Polyporales sp. KUC8959

Authors: Choi, Y-S; Kim, J-J; Kim, M-J; Son, J; Kim, G-H (In Press) Journal of Environmental Management. HERO ID: 1519065

[Less] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction conditions (i.e., culture filtrate . . . [More] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction conditions (i.e., culture filtrate concentration, extraction temperature, and extraction time) on the removal of metals from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood particles by using an unknown Polyporales sp. KUC8959. As the first research, a 20-run central composite design using response surface methodology was applied to optimize the system and construct the models, which predicted metal removal by bioleaching. The coefficients of determination of fitted models were 0.874-0.989, which indicated that the models can predict the metal removal yield accurately under various conditions. The Cu removal model suggested that the following conditions, culture filtrate concentration of 45.8%, extraction temperature of 34.2 °C, and extraction time of 20.6 h, were required for maximal removal of Cu (82.1%). The model predicted that extraction conditions of increased severity would result in complete removal of Cr and As from CCA-treated wood particles. In order to confirm actual metals removal efficiency, metals extraction was subsequently conducted under optimal bioleaching condition evaluated in this study. By applying the model, we demonstrated 83.9% Cu, 96.0% Cr, and 99.3% As removal from treated wood particles.