Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Uranium


25,349 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Base-Driven Assembly of Large Uranium Oxo/Hydroxo Clusters

Authors: Biswas, B; Mougel, V; Pécaut, J; Mazzanti, M (In Press) HERO ID: 1423239


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Twenty-four-hour urinary trace element excretion: Reference intervals and interpretive issues

Authors: Sieniawska, CE; Jung, LC; Olufadi, R; Walker, V (In Press) Annals of Clinical Biochemistry. HERO ID: 1015724

[Less] BACKGROUND: Introduction of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) into clinical laboratories . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Introduction of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) into clinical laboratories has led to an increasing application of analyses to risk assessment for toxicity from environmental exposure to trace elements, and in occupational monitoring. Interpretation of results from random urine samples may be problematic and measurement of excretion over 24 h is sometimes preferable. Recent reference data are sparse. METHODS: Twenty-four-hour urine samples from 111 healthy adults from the renal stones clinic in Southampton, UK, were analysed for 31 trace elements using ICP-MS and for zinc using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Non-parametric 0.95 coverage intervals were determined for trace element excretion per 24 h and as a ratio to creatinine, for the full study cohort and separately for men (n = 77) and women (n = 34). RESULTS: Beryllium was undetectable in 95% of samples, bismuth in 87% and uranium in 75%. In comparison with published ranges, reference intervals for this cohort were higher for molybdenum, tin and vanadium, and for arsenic due to inclusion of fish arsenicals. Aluminium, chromium, iron, lead and mercury were lower. In our cohort, 24-h excretion of 17 elements was significantly higher in men than in women. However, when expressed as trace element to creatinine ratios, the situation reversed strikingly. Because of their lower creatinine excretion, ratios for 18 elements were significantly higher for women. CONCLUSIONS: New adult reference intervals were obtained for 24-h urine trace element excretion. Trace element:creatinine ratios must be used cautiously, with separate ranges for men and women.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effect of natural uranium on the UMR-106 osteoblastic cell line: Impairment of the autophagic process as an underlying mechanism of uranium toxicity

Authors: Pierrefite-Carle, V; Santucci-Darmanin, S; Breuil, V; Gritsaenko, T; Vidaud, C; Creff, G; Solari, PL; Pagnotta, S; Al-Sahlanee, R; Auwer, CD; Carle, GF (In Press) Archives of Toxicology. HERO ID: 3449572

[Less] Natural uranium (U), which is present in our environment, exerts a chemical toxicity, particularly in . . . [More] Natural uranium (U), which is present in our environment, exerts a chemical toxicity, particularly in bone where it accumulates. Generally, U is found at oxidation state +VI in its oxocationic form [Formula: see text] in aqueous media. Although U(VI) has been reported to induce cell death in osteoblasts, the cells in charge of bone formation, the molecular mechanism for U(VI) effects in these cells remains poorly understood. The objective of our study was to explore U(VI) effect at doses ranging from 5 to 600 µM, on mineralization and autophagy induction in the UMR-106 model osteoblastic cell line and to determine U(VI) speciation after cellular uptake. Our results indicate that U(VI) affects mineralization function, even at subtoxic concentrations (<100 µM). The combination of thermodynamic modeling of U with EXAFS data in the culture medium and in the cells clearly indicates the biotransformation of U(VI) carbonate species into a meta-autunite phase upon uptake by osteoblasts. We next assessed U(VI) effect at 100 and 300 µM on autophagy, a survival process triggered by various stresses such as metal exposure. We observed that U(VI) was able to rapidly activate autophagy but an inhibition of the autophagic flux was observed after 24 h. Thus, our results indicate that U(VI) perturbs osteoblastic functions by reducing mineralization capacity. Our study identifies for the first time U(VI) in the form of meta-autunite in mammalian cells. In addition, U(VI)-mediated inhibition of the autophagic flux may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to the decreased mineralization and the toxicity observed in osteoblasts.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A survey of arsenic, manganese, boron, thorium, and other toxic metals in the groundwater of a West Bengal, India neighbourhood

Authors: Bacquart, T; Bradshaw, K; Frisbie, S; Mitchell, E; Springston, G; Defelice, J; Dustin, H; Sarkar, B (In Press) Metallomics. HERO ID: 1070432

[Less] Around 150 million people are at risk from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in India and Bangladesh. . . . [More] Around 150 million people are at risk from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in India and Bangladesh. Multiple metal analysis in Bangladesh has found other toxic elements above the World Health Organization (WHO) health-based drinking water guidelines which significantly increases the number of people at risk due to drinking groundwater. In this study, drinking water samples from the Bongaon area (North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India) were analyzed for multiple metal contamination in order to evaluate groundwater quality on the neighbourhood scale. Each sample was analyzed for arsenic (As), boron (B), barium (Ba), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and uranium (U). Arsenic was found above the WHO health-based drinking water guideline in 50% of these tubewells. Mn and B were found at significant concentrations in 19% and 6% of these tubewells, respectively. The maps of As, Mn, and B concentrations suggest that approximately 75% of this area has no safe tubewells. The concentrations of As, Mn, B, and many other toxic elements are independent of each other. The concentrations of Pb and U were not found above WHO health-based drinking water guidelines but they were statistically related to each other (p-value = 0.001). An analysis of selected isotopes in the Uranium, Actinium, and Thorium Radioactive Decay Series revealed the presence of thorium (Th) in 31% of these tubewells. This discovery of Th, which does not have a WHO health-based drinking water guideline, is a potential public health challenge. In sum, the widespread presence and independent distribution of other metals besides As must be taken into consideration for drinking water remediation strategies involving well switching or home-scale water treatment.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Action levels for airborne uranium in the workplace: Chemical and radiological assessments

Authors: Leggett, RW; Meck, R (2018) Journal of Radiological Protection. HERO ID: 4259530

[Less] A method is described for deriving two levels of action, an investigation level (IL) and an immediate . . . [More] A method is described for deriving two levels of action, an investigation level (IL) and an immediate action level (IAL), for different forms and mixtures of the natural uranium (U) isotopes 234U, 235U, and 238U in air in the workplace. An IL indicates the need to confirm the validity of moderately elevated measurements of airborne U and adequacy of confinement controls and determine whether work limitations are appropriate. An IAL indicates that safeguards should be put into place immediately, including removal of workers from further exposure until conditions are acceptable. Derivations of ILs and IALs are based on latest radiation protection guidance, information on chemical toxicity of U, and biokinetic models for U. An action level (IL or IAL) is the more restrictive of two derived values, the action level based on U as a chemical hazard and the action level based on U as a radiation hazard.

Archival Material
Archival Material

Navajo Nation: Cleaning Up Abandoned Uranium Mines

Author: US EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4182755


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Analysis of mortality in a pooled cohort of Canadian and German uranium processing workers with no mining experience

Authors: Zablotska, LB; Fenske, N; Schnelzer, M; Zhivin, S; Laurier, D; Kreuzer, M (2018) International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 91:91-103. HERO ID: 4259529

[Less] PURPOSE: Long-term health risks of occupational exposures to uranium processing were . . . [More] PURPOSE: Long-term health risks of occupational exposures to uranium processing were examined to better understand potential differences with uranium underground miners and nuclear reactor workers.

METHODS: A cohort study of mortality of workers from Port Hope, Canada (1950-1999) and Wismut, Germany (1946-2008) employed in uranium milling, refining, and processing was conducted. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the association between cumulative exposures to radon decay products (RDP) and gamma-rays and causes of death potentially related to uranium processing.

RESULTS: The pooled cohort included 7431 workers (270,201 person-years of follow-up). Mean RDP exposures were lower than in miners while gamma-ray doses were higher than in reactor workers. Both exposures were highly correlated (weighted rho = 0.81). Radiation risks of lung cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in males were increased but not statistically significant and compatible with risks estimated for miners and reactor workers, respectively. Higher RDP-associated CVD risks were observed for exposures 5-14 years prior to diagnosis compared to later exposures and among those employed <5 years. Radiation risks of solid cancers excluding lung cancer were increased, but not statistically significant, both for males and females, while all other causes of death were not associated with exposures.

CONCLUSIONS: In the largest study of uranium processing workers to systematically examine radiation risks of multiple outcomes from RDP exposures and gamma-rays, estimated radiation risks were compatible with risks reported for uranium miners and nuclear reactor workers. Continued follow-up and pooling with other cohorts of uranium processing workers are necessary for future comparisons with other workers of the nuclear fuel cycle.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Depleted uranium and human health

Authors: Faa, A; Gerosa, C; Fanni, D; Floris, G; Eyken, PV; Lachowicz, JI; Nurchi, VM (2018) Current Medicinal Chemistry 25:49-64. [Review] HERO ID: 4259540

[Less] Depleted uranium (DU) is generally considered an emerging pollutant, first extensively introduced into . . . [More] Depleted uranium (DU) is generally considered an emerging pollutant, first extensively introduced into environment in the early nineties in Iraq, during the military operation called "Desert Storm". DU has been hypothesized to represent a hazardous element both for soldiers exposed as well as for the inhabitants of the polluted areas in the war zones. In this review, the possible consequences on human health of DU released in the environment are critically analyzed. In the first part, the chemical properties of DU and the principal civil and military uses are summarized. A concise analysis of the mechanisms underlying absorption, blood transport, tissue distribution and excretion of DU in the human body is the subject of the second part of this article. The following sections deal with pathological condition putatively associated with overexposure to DU. Developmental and birth defects, the Persian Gulf syndrome, and kidney diseases that have been associated to DU are the arguments treated in the third section. Finally, data regarding DU exposure and cancer insurgence will be critically analyzed, including leukemia/lymphoma, lung cancer, uterine cervix cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer and testicular cancer. The aim of the authors is to give a contribution to the debate on DU and its effects on human health and disease.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Analysis of mortality in a pooled cohort of Canadian and German uranium processing workers with no mining experience (Supplementary materials)

Authors: Zablotska, LB; Fenske, N; Schnelzer, M; Zhivin, S; Laurier, D; Kreuzer, M (2018) International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 91. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 4260462

Abstract: Supplementary materials

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Chronic exposure to uranium from gestation: Effects on behavior and neurogenesis in adulthood

Authors: Dinocourt C; Culeux C; Legrand M; Elie C; Lestaevel P (2017) International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14. HERO ID: 4259524

[Less] Uranium exposure leads to cerebral dysfunction involving for instance biochemical, neurochemical and . . . [More] Uranium exposure leads to cerebral dysfunction involving for instance biochemical, neurochemical and neurobehavioral effects. Most studies have focused on mechanisms in uranium-exposed adult animals. However, recent data on developing animals have shown that the developing brain is also sensitive to uranium. Models of uranium exposure during brain development highlight the need to improve our understanding of the effects of uranium. In a model in which uranium exposure began from the first day of gestation, we studied the neurobehavioral consequences as well as the progression of hippocampal neurogenesis in animals from dams exposed to uranium. Our results show that 2-month-old rats exposed to uranium from gestational day 1 displayed deficits in special memory and a prominent depressive-like phenotype. Cell proliferation was not disturbed in these animals, as shown by 5-bromo-2′deoxyuridine (BrdU)/neuronal specific nuclear protein (NeuN) immunostaining in the dentate gyrus. However, in some animals, the pyramidal cell layer was dispersed in the CA3 region. From our previous results with the same model, the hypothesis of alterations of neurogenesis at prior stages of development is worth considering, but is probably not the only one. Therefore, further investigations are needed to correlate cerebral dysfunction and its underlying mechanistic pathways.