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Phthalates – Targeted Search for Epidemiological Studies

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88 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Pathogenesis of uterine adenomyosis: invagination or metaplasia?

Authors: García-Solares, J; Donnez, J; Donnez, O; Dolmans, MM (2018) HERO ID: 4728566

[Less] Adenomyosis is a commonly diagnosed estrogen-dependent gynecological disorder that causes pelvic pain, . . . [More] Adenomyosis is a commonly diagnosed estrogen-dependent gynecological disorder that causes pelvic pain, abnormal uterine bleeding, and infertility. Despite its prevalence and severity of symptoms, its pathogenesis and etiology have not yet been elucidated. The aim of this manuscript is to review the different hypotheses on the origin of adenomyotic lesions and the mechanisms involved in the evolution and progression of the disease. Two main theories have been proposed to explain the origin of adenomyosis. The most common suggests involvement of tissue injury and the repair mechanism and claims that adenomyosis results from invagination of the endometrial basalis into the myometrium. An alternative theory maintains that adenomyotic lesions result from metaplasia of displaced embryonic pluripotent Müllerian remnants or differentiation of adult stem cells. Previous investigations performed in human adenomyotic lesions and corroborated by studies in mice supported the involvement of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process in the early stages of progression and spread of adenomyosis. However, studies conducted in a recently developed baboon model indicate that collective cell migration may be implicated in the later events of invasion. This suggests that the invasiveness of this complex uterine disorder is not driven by a single mechanism of migration but by a time-dependent combination of two processes.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Microparticles, microcapsules and microspheres: A review of recent developments and prospects for oral delivery of insulin

Authors: Wong, CY; Al-Salami, H; Dass, CR (2018) HERO ID: 4728573

[Less] Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic health disease affecting the homeostasis of blood sugar levels. . . . [More] Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic health disease affecting the homeostasis of blood sugar levels. However, subcutaneous injection of insulin can lead to patient non-compliance, discomfort, pain and local infection. Sub-micron sized drug delivery systems have gained attention in oral delivery of insulin for diabetes treatment. In most of the recent literature, the terms "microparticles" and "nanoparticle" refer to particles where the dimensions of the particle are measured in micrometers and nanometers respectively. For instance, insulin-loaded particles are defined as microparticles with size larger than 1 μm by most of the research groups. The size difference between nanoparticles and microparticles proffers numerous effects on the drug loading efficiency, aggregation, permeability across the biological membranes, cell entry and tissue retention. For instance, microparticulate drug delivery systems have demonstrated a number of advantages including protective effect against enzymatic degradation, enhancement of peptide stability, site-specific and controlled drug release. Compared to nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, microparticulate formulations can facilitate oral absorption of insulin by paracellular, transcellular and lymphatic routes. In this article, we review the current status of microparticles, microcapsules and microspheres for oral administration of insulin. A number of novel techniques including layer-by-layer coating, self-polymerisation of shell, nanocomposite microparticulate drug delivery system seem to be promising for enhancing the oral bioavailability of insulin. This review draws several conclusions for future directions and challenges to be addressed for optimising the properties of microparticulate drug formulations and enhancing their hypoglycaemic effects.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Immune System: An Emerging Player in Mediating Effects of Endocrine Disruptors on Metabolic Health

Authors: Bansal, A; Henao-Mejia, J; Simmons, RA (2018) HERO ID: 4728690

[Less] The incidence of metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes and obesity continues to increase. In addition . . . [More] The incidence of metabolic disorders like type 2 diabetes and obesity continues to increase. In addition to the well-known contributors to these disorders, such as food intake and sedentary lifestyle, recent research in the exposure science discipline provides evidence that exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals like bisphenol A and phthalates via multiple routes (e.g., food, drink, skin contact) also contribute to the increased risk of metabolic disorders. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can disrupt any aspect of hormone action. It is becoming increasingly clear that EDCs not only affect endocrine function but also adversely affect immune system function. In this review, we focus on human, animal, and in vitro studies that demonstrate EDC exposure induces dysfunction of the immune system, which, in turn, has detrimental effects on metabolic health. These findings highlight how the immune system is emerging as a novel player by which EDCs may mediate their effects on metabolic health. We also discuss studies highlighting mechanisms by which EDCs affect the immune system. Finally, we consider that a better understanding of the immunomodulatory roles of EDCs will provide clues to enhance metabolic function and contribute toward the long-term goal of reducing the burden of environmentally induced diabetes and obesity.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

[House Dust and Its Adverse Health Effects]

Authors: Araki, A; Ait Bamai, Y; Ketema, RM; Kishi, R (2018) HERO ID: 4728849

[Less] In this review, we examine house dust and its effect on inhabitants' health. Residential house dust . . . [More] In this review, we examine house dust and its effect on inhabitants' health. Residential house dust includes components from plants, pollens, microorganisms, insects, skin flakes, hairs and fibers. It also includes materials contaminated with chemicals from combustion, furniture, interior materials, electronics, cleaning agents, personal care products. Nowadays, most people spend their time indoors. Thus, dust is an important medium of exposure to pollutions. According to United States Environmental Protection Agency Exposure Factors Handbook, the estimated amount of dust ingestion is 30 mg/day for adults, and 60 mg/day for children over 1 year of age. Since 2003, we have been conducting epidemiological studies to find the association between the indoor environment and the inhabitants' health. The levels of mite allergens, endotoxins, and β-1,3-d-glucan in house dust were measured as biological factors. Semi volatile organic compounds (SVOC) such as phthalates and phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) in dust were also analyzed. As a result, we found that the ORs (95%CI) of nasal and optical symptoms of sick building syndrome (SBS) were 1.45 (1.01-2.10) and 1.47 (1.14-1.88), respectively, when there was a 10-fold increase in the levels of mite allergens. There was no association of mite allergens with allergies. Endotoxins and β-1,3-d-glucan did not show any association with SBS. Regarding SVOC, increased levels of phthalates and PFR increased the risk of allergies. The association between phthalates and increased risk of allergies was clearer among children than adults. There were no gold standards of dust sampling and pretreatment methods. Thus, caution is needed when comparing findings of various studies. Methods should accurately reflect exposure levels.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

hCG and Its Disruption by Environmental Contaminants during Human Pregnancy

Authors: Paulesu, L; Rao, CV; Ietta, F; Pietropolli, A; Ticconi, C (2018) HERO ID: 4728404

[Less] Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone of considerable importance in the establishment, promotion . . . [More] Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone of considerable importance in the establishment, promotion and maintenance of human pregnancy. It has been clearly demonstrated that hCG exerts multiple endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions on a variety of gestational and non-gestational cells and tissues. These actions are directed to promote trophoblast invasiveness and differentiation, placental growth, angiogenesis in uterine vasculature, hormone production, modulation of the immune system at the maternal-fetal interface, inhibition of myometrial contractility as well as fetal growth and differentiation. In recent years, considerable interest has been raised towards the biological effects of environmental contaminants, particularly endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Emerging evidence suggests that prenatal exposure to selected EDCs can have a deleterious impact on the fetus and long-lasting consequences also in adult life. The results of the in vitro effects of commonly found EDCs, particularly Bisphenol A (BPA) and para-Nonylphenol (p-NP), indicate that these substances can alter hCG production and through this action could exert their fetal damage, suggesting that hCG could represent and become a potentially useful clinical biomarker of an inappropriate prenatal exposure to these substances.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The impact of prenatal insults on the human placental epigenome: A systematic review

Authors: Palma-Gudiel, H; Cirera, F; Crispi, F; Eixarch, E; Fañanás, L (2018) HERO ID: 4633706

[Less] The placenta is the first human organ to reach full development during pregnancy. It serves as a barrier . . . [More] The placenta is the first human organ to reach full development during pregnancy. It serves as a barrier but also as an interchange surface. Epigenetic changes observed in placental tissue may reflect intrauterine insults while also pointing to physiological pathways altered under exposure to such environmental threats. By means of a systematic search of the literature, 39 papers assessing human placental epigenetic signatures in association with either (i) psychosocial stress, (ii) maternal psychopathology, (iii) maternal smoking during pregnancy, and (iv) exposure to environmental pollutants, were identified. Their findings revealed placental tissue as a unique source of epigenetic variability that does not correlate with epigenetic patterns observed in maternal or newborn blood, tissues which are typically analyzed regarding prenatal stress. Studies regarding prenatal stress and psychopathology during pregnancy were scarce and exploratory in nature revealing inconsistent findings. Of note, there was a marked tendency towards placental hypomethylation in studies assessing either tobacco use during pregnancy or exposure to environmental pollutants suggesting the interaction between contaminant-derived metabolites and epigenetic machinery. This review highlights the need for further prospective longitudinal studies assessing long-term health effects of placental epigenetic signatures derived from exposure to several prenatal stressors.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The role of nutrition in influencing mechanisms involved in environmentally mediated diseases

Authors: Hennig, B; Petriello, MC; Gamble, MV; Surh, YJ; Kresty, LA; Frank, N; Rangkadilok, N; Ruchirawat, M; Suk, WA (2018) Reviews on Environmental Health. [Review] HERO ID: 4229717

[Less] Human exposure to environmental contaminants such as persistent chlorinated organics, heavy metals, . . . [More] Human exposure to environmental contaminants such as persistent chlorinated organics, heavy metals, pesticides, phthalates, flame retardants, electronic waste and airborne pollutants around the world, and especially in Southeast Asian regions, are significant and require urgent attention. Given this widespread contamination and abundance of such toxins as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the ecosystem, it is unlikely that remediation alone will be sufficient to address the health impacts associated with this exposure. Furthermore, we must assume that the impact on health of some of these contaminants results in populations with extraordinary vulnerabilities to disease risks. Further exacerbating risk; infectious diseases, poverty and malnutrition are common in the Southeast Asian regions of the world. Thus, exploring preventive measures of environmental exposure and disease risk through new paradigms of environmental toxicology, optimal and/or healthful nutrition and health is essential. For example, folic acid supplementation can lower blood arsenic levels, and plant-derived bioactive nutrients can lower cardiovascular and cancer risks linked to pollutant exposure. Data also indicate that diets enriched with bioactive food components such as polyphenols and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids can prevent or decrease toxicant-induced inflammation. Thus, consuming healthy diets that exhibit high levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, is a meaningful way to reduce the vulnerability to non-communicable diseases linked to environmental toxic insults. This nutritional paradigm in environmental toxicology requires further study in order to improve our understanding of the relationship between nutrition or other lifestyle modifications and toxicant-induced diseases. Understanding mechanistic relationships between nutritional modulation of environmental toxicants and susceptibility to disease development are important for both cumulative risk assessment and the design and implementation of future public health programs and behavioral interventions.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Organic contamination and remediation in the agricultural soils of China: A critical review

Authors: Sun, J; Pan, L; Tsang, DCW; Zhan, Y; Zhu, L; Li, X (2018) Science of the Total Environment 615:724-740. [Review] HERO ID: 4181297

[Less] Soil pollution is a global problem in both developed and developing countries. Countries with rapidly . . . [More] Soil pollution is a global problem in both developed and developing countries. Countries with rapidly developing economies such as China are faced with significant soil pollution problems due to accelerated industrialization and urbanization over the last decades. This paper provides an overview of published scientific data on soil pollution across China with particular focus on organic contamination in agricultural soils. Based on the related peer-reviewed papers published since 2000 (n=203), we evaluated the priority organic contaminants across China, revealed their spatial and temporal distributions at the national scale, identified their possible sources and fates in soil, assessed their potential environmental risks, and presented the challenges in current remediation technologies regarding the combined organic pollution of agricultural soils. The primary pollutants in Northeast China were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to intensive fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs) were higher in North and Central China owing to concentrated agricultural activities. The levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were higher in East and South China primarily because of past industrial operations and improper electronic waste processing. The co-existence of organic contaminants was severe in the Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta, and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, which are the most populated and industrialized regions in China. Integrated biological-chemical remediation technologies, such as surfactant-enhanced bioremediation, have potential uses in the remediation of soil contaminated by multiple contaminants. This critical review highlighted several future research directions including combined pollution, interfacial interactions, food safety, bioavailability, ecological effects, and integrated remediation methods for combined organic pollution in soil.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Overview of air pollution and endocrine disorders

Author: Darbre, PD (2018) HERO ID: 4728840

[Less] Over recent years, many environmental pollutant chemicals have been shown to possess the ability to . . . [More] Over recent years, many environmental pollutant chemicals have been shown to possess the ability to interfere in the functioning of the endocrine system and have been termed endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These compounds exist in air as volatile or semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase or attached to particulate matter. They include components of plastics (phthalates, bisphenol A), components of consumer goods (parabens, triclosan, alkylphenols, fragrance compounds, organobromine flame retardants, fluorosurfactants), industrial chemicals (polychlorinated biphenyls), products of combustion (polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/furans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons), pesticides, herbicides, and some metals. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the sources of EDCs in air, measurements of levels of EDCs in air, and the potential for adverse effects of EDCs in air on human endocrine health.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Disparities in Environmental Exposures to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals and Diabetes Risk in Vulnerable Populations

Authors: Ruiz, D; Becerra, M; Jagai, JS; Ard, K; Sargis, RM (2018) Diabetes Care 41:193-205. [Review] HERO ID: 4167830

[Less] Burgeoning epidemiological, animal, and cellular data link environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals . . . [More] Burgeoning epidemiological, animal, and cellular data link environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to metabolic dysfunction. Disproportionate exposure to diabetes-associated EDCs may be an underappreciated contributor to disparities in metabolic disease risk. The burden of diabetes is not uniformly borne by American society; rather, this disease disproportionately affects certain populations, including African Americans, Latinos, and low-income individuals. The purpose of this study was to review the evidence linking unequal exposures to EDCs with racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diabetes disparities in the U.S.; discuss social forces promoting these disparities; and explore potential interventions. Articles examining the links between chemical exposures and metabolic disease were extracted from the U.S. National Library of Medicine for the period of 1966 to 3 December 2016. EDCs associated with diabetes in the literature were then searched for evidence of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic exposure disparities. Among Latinos, African Americans, and low-income individuals, numerous studies have reported significantly higher exposures to diabetogenic EDCs, including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, multiple chemical constituents of air pollution, bisphenol A, and phthalates. This review reveals that unequal exposure to EDCs may be a novel contributor to diabetes disparities. Efforts to reduce the individual and societal burden of diabetes should include educating clinicians on environmental exposures that may increase disease risk, strategies to reduce those exposures, and social policies to address environmental inequality as a novel source of diabetes disparities.