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Diisobutyl Phthalate (DIBP) Final

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25 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Urinary phthalate and phthalate alternative metabolites and isoprostane among couples undergoing fertility treatment

Authors: Wu, H; Olmsted, A; Cantonwine, DE; Shahsavari, S; Rahil, T; Sites, C; Pilsner, JR (2017) Environmental Research 153:1-7. HERO ID: 3483281

[Less] BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data suggest associations between phthalate exposures to . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data suggest associations between phthalate exposures to a variety of adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced sperm quality and reproductive success. While mechanisms of these associations are not fully elucidated, oxidative stress has been implicated as a potential mediator. We examined associations of urinary metabolites of phthalates and phthalate alternative plasticizers with oxidative stress among couples seeking fertility treatment.

METHODS: Seventeen urinary plasticizer metabolites and 15-F2t isoprostane, a biomarker of oxidative stress, were quantified in spot samples from 50 couples seeking fertility treatment who enrolled in the Sperm Environmental Epigenetics and Development Study during 2014-2015.

RESULTS: In multivariable analyses, percent change in isoprostane was positively associated with interquartile range increases for the oxidative metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, [mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (MEHHP; 20.0%, p=0.02), mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (MEOHP; 24.1%, p=0.01), and mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP; 24.1%, p=0.004)], mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP; 17.8%, p=0.02), mono-hydroxyisobutyl phthalate (MHiBP; 27.5%, p=0.003), and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono-hydroxy-isononyl ester (MHINCH; 32.3%, p=0.002). Stratification of participants by sex revealed that isoprostane was positively associated with MHiBP (41.4%, p=0.01) and monocarboxy-isononyl phthalate (MCNP; 26.0%, p=0.02) among females and MEOHP (35.8%, p=0.03), MiBP (29.2%, p=0.01), MHiBP (34.7%, p=0.007) and MHINCH (49.0%, p=0.002) among males.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that exposure to phthalates and phthalate replacements are associated with higher levels of oxidative stress in a sex-specific manner. Additional studies are needed to replicate our findings and to examine the potential health implications of the use of phthalates and alternative phthalates in consumer end products.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Early prenatal phthalate exposure, sex steroid hormones, and birth outcomes

Authors: Sathyanarayana, S; Butts, S; Wang, C; Barrett, E; Nguyen, R; Schwartz, SM; Haaland, W; Swan, SH; TIDES Team (2017) Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 102:1870-1878. HERO ID: 3859034

[Less] Context: Adequate sex steroid hormone concentrations are essential for normal fetal . . . [More] Context: Adequate sex steroid hormone concentrations are essential for normal fetal genital development in early pregnancy. Our previous study demonstrated an inverse relationship between third-trimester di-2-ethyl hexyl phthalate exposure and total testosterone (TT) concentrations. Here, we examine early-pregnancy phthalates, sex steroid hormone concentrations, and newborn reproductive outcomes.

Design: We examined associations between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in early pregnancy and serum free testosterone (FT), TT, estrone (E1), and estradiol (E2) in 591 woman/infant dyads in The Infant Development and Environment Study; we also examined relationships between hormones and newborn genital outcomes using multiple regression models with covariate adjustment.

Results: E1 and E2 concentrations were 15% to 30% higher in relation to 1-unit increases in log monoisobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-2-ethyl hexyl phthalate, and mono-2-ethyl-5-oxy-hexyl phthalate concentrations, and E2 was 15% higher in relation to increased log monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP). FT concentrations were 12% lower in relation to 1-unit increases in log mono(carboxynonyl) phthalate (MCNP) and mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate concentrations. Higher maternal FT was associated with a 25% lower prevalence of having a male genital abnormality at birth.

Conclusions: The positive relationships between MiBP, MBzP, and DEHP metabolites and E1/E2 are unique and suggest a positive estrogenic effect in early pregnancy. The inverse relationship between MCNP and DEHP metabolites and serum FT supports previous work examining phthalate/testosterone relationships later in pregnancy. Higher FT in relation to a 25% lower prevalence of male genital abnormalities confirms the importance of testosterone in early fetal development.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Urinary concentrations of 25 phthalate metabolites in Brazilian children and their association with oxidative DNA damage

Authors: Rocha, BA; Asimakopoulos, AG; Barbosa, F; Kannan, K (2017) Science of the Total Environment 586:152-162. HERO ID: 3531624

[Less] Exposure of humans to phthalates has received considerable attention due to the ubiquitous occurrence . . . [More] Exposure of humans to phthalates has received considerable attention due to the ubiquitous occurrence and potential adverse health effects of these chemicals. Nevertheless, little is known about the exposure of the Brazilian population to phthalates. In this study, concentrations of 25 phthalate metabolites were determined in urine samples collected from 300 Brazilian children (6-14years old). Further, the association between urinary phthalate concentrations and a biomarker of oxidative stress, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHDG), was examined. Overall, eleven phthalate metabolites were found in at least 95% of the samples analyzed. The highest median concentrations were found for monoethyl phthalate (mEP; 57.3ngmL(-1)), mono-(2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl) phthalate (mECPP; 52.8ngmL(-1)), mono-isobutyl phthalate (mIBP; 43.8ngmL(-1)), and mono-n-butyl phthalate (mBP; 42.4ngmL(-1)). The secondary metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and mEP, mIBP, and mBP were the most abundant compounds, accounting for >90% of the total concentrations. On the basis of the measured concentrations of urinary phthalate metabolites, we estimated daily intakes of the parent phthalates, which were 0.3, 1.7, 1.8, 2.1, and 7.2μg/kg-bw/day for dimethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, and DEHP, respectively. Approximately one-quarter of the Brazilian children had a hazard index of >1 for phthalate exposures. Statistically significant positive associations were found between 8OHDG and the concentration of the sum of phthalate metabolites, sum of DEHP metabolites, mEP, mIBP, mBP, monomethyl phthalate, mono(3-carboxypropyl) phthalate, monobenzyl phthalate, monocarboxyoctyl phthalate, monocarboxynonyl phthalate, monoisopentyl phthalate, and mono-n-propyl phthalate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the exposure of a Brazilian population to phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Exposure to an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture causes transgenerational effects on female reproduction in mice

Authors: Zhou, C; Gao, L; Flaws, JA (2017) Endocrinology 158:1739-1754. HERO ID: 3859038

[Less] Phthalates are used in consumer products and are known endocrine-disrupting chemicals. However, limited . . . [More] Phthalates are used in consumer products and are known endocrine-disrupting chemicals. However, limited information is available on the effects of phthalate mixtures on female reproduction. Previously, we developed a phthalate mixture made of 35% diethyl phthalate, 21% di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 15% dibutyl phthalate, 15% di-isononyl phthalate, 8% di-isobutyl phthalate, and 5% benzylbutyl phthalate that mimics human exposure. We tested the effects of prenatal exposure to this mixture on reproductive outcomes in first-filial-generation (F1) female mice and found that it impaired reproductive outcomes. However, the impact of this exposure on second-filial-generation (F2) and third-filial-generation (F3) females was unknown. Thus, we hypothesized that prenatal exposure to the phthalate mixture induces multigenerational and transgenerational effects on female reproduction. Pregnant CD-1 dams were orally dosed with vehicle (tocopherol-stripped corn oil) or a phthalate mixture (20 and 200 µg/kg/d, 200 and 500 mg/kg/d) daily from gestational day 10 to birth. Adult F1 females born to these dams were used to generate the F2 generation and adult F2 females born to F1 females were used to generate the F3 generation. F2 and F3 females were subjected to tissue collections and fertility tests. Prenatal phthalate mixture exposure increased uterine weight, anogenital distance, and body weight; induced cystic ovaries; and caused fertility complications in the F2 generation. It also increased uterine weight, decreased anogenital distance, and caused fertility complications in the F3 generation. These data suggest that prenatal exposure to the phthalate mixture induces multigenerational and transgenerational effects on female reproduction.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phthalates and thyroid function in preschool age children: Sex specific associations

Authors: Morgenstern, R; Whyatt, RM; Insel, BJ; Calafat, AM; Liu, X; Rauh, VA; Herbstman, J; Bradwin, G; Factor-Litvak, P (2017) Environment International 106:11-18. HERO ID: 3859039

[Less] BACKGROUND: Research relating either prenatal or concurrent measures of phthalate exposure . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Research relating either prenatal or concurrent measures of phthalate exposure to thyroid function in preschool children is inconclusive.

METHODS: In a study of inner-city mothers and their children, metabolites of di-n-butyl phthalate, butylbenzyl phthalate, di-isobutyl phthalate, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and diethyl phthalate were measured in a spot urine sample collected from women in late pregnancy and from their children at age 3years. We measured children's serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) at age 3. Linear regression models were used to investigate the associations between phthalate metabolites, measured in maternal urine during late pregnancy and measured in child urine at age 3 and thyroid function measured at age 3.

RESULTS: Mean concentrations (ranges) were 1.42ng/dL (1.02-2.24) for FT4, and 2.62uIU/mL (0.61-11.67) for TSH. In the children at age 3, among girls, FT4 decreased with increasing loge mono-n-butyl phthalate [estimated b=-0.06; 95% CI: (-0.09, -0.02)], loge mono-isobutyl phthalate [b=-0.05; 95% CI: (-0.09, -0.01)], loge monoethyl phthalate [b=-0.04; 95% CI: (-0.07, -0.01)], and loge mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate [b=-0.04; 95% CI: (-0.07, -0.003)] and loge mono(2-ethyl-5-oxy-hexyl) phthalate [b=-0.04; 95% CI: (-0.07, -0.004)]. In contrast, among boys, we observed no associations between FT4 and child phthalate metabolites at age 3. On the other hand, in late gestation, FT4 increased with increasing loge mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate [estimated b=0.04; 95% CI: (0.02, 0.06)] and no sex difference was observed. We found no associations between phthalate biomarkers measured in either the child or prenatal samples and TSH at age 3.

CONCLUSIONS: The data show inverse and sex specific associations between specific phthalate metabolites measured in children at age 3 and thyroid function in preschool children. These results may provide evidence for the hypothesis that reductions in thyroid hormones mediate associations between early life phthalate exposure and child cognitive outcomes.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Intellectual evaluation of children exposed to phthalate-tainted products after the 2011 Taiwan phthalate episode

Authors: Huang, PC; Tsai, CH; Chen, CC; Wu, MT; Chen, ML; Wang, SL; Chen, BH; Lee, CC; Jaakkola, JJK; Wu, WC; Chen, MK; Hsiung, CA; Group, R (2017) Environmental Research 156:158-166. HERO ID: 3859028

[Less] INTRODUCTION: Phthalate exposure may reduce intellectual development in young children. . . . [More] INTRODUCTION: Phthalate exposure may reduce intellectual development in young children. In 2011, numerous Taiwanese children had been reported to have consumed phthalate-tainted products. We investigated the effects of phthalate exposure on the intellectual development of these children after the 2011 Taiwan di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) episode.

METHODS: We recruited 204 children, aged 3-12 y, from 3 hospitals in Taiwan between 2012 and 2013. First-morning urine samples were collected for analyzing 5 phthalate metabolites. We applied a Bayesian model to estimate the past DEHP exposure (estDEHPADD) of each participant before the 2011 DEHP episode. Demographic information, consumption of phthalate-tainted products, and maternal education, of each participant were obtained using a questionnaire. We used the Wechsler intelligence evaluation tools for assessing the children's and maternal intelligence quotient.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The median levels of mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate, mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), mono-n-butyl phthalate, and mono-iso-butyl phthalate in the children were 9.97, 45.8, 32.2, 46.2, and 24.3μg/g creatinine, respectively. Using the aforementioned urinary phthalate metabolites, we found that the children's verbal comprehension index (N =98) was significantly negatively associated with urinary log10 MEOHP (β, -11.92; SE, 5.33; 95%CI, -22.52~ -1.33; P=0.028) and log10 ΣDBP metabolites (β, -10.95; SE, 4.93; 95%CI, -20.74~ -1.16; P=0.029) after adjustment for age, gender, maternal IQ and education, passive smoking, estDEHPADD, active and passive smoking during pregnancy. Through a tolerable daily intake-based approach, we only found a significant negative association between past estimate DEHPADD and VIQ≥3-<6 in preschool children whereas no correlation was observed between current DEHP exposure and IQ≥3-<6 score with/ without estimate DEHPADD adjustment. It revealed that the effect of past high-DEHP exposure on verbal-related neurodevelopment of younger child are more sensitive.

CONCLUSION: Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to DEHP and DnBP affects intellectual development in preschool and school-aged children, particularly their language learning or expression ability.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Maternal prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and visual recognition memory among infants at 27 weeks

Authors: Ipapo, KN; Factor-Litvak, P; Whyatt, RM; Calafat, AM; Diaz, D; Perera, F; Rauh, V; Herbstman, JB (2017) Environmental Research 155:7-14. HERO ID: 3859030

[Less] BACKGROUND: Prior research has demonstrated inverse associations between maternal prenatal . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Prior research has demonstrated inverse associations between maternal prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and cognitive development assessed in preschool and school-aged children. While there are a limited number of studies that evaluated these associations during infancy, no study has evaluated whether these associations exist when using the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (FTII), which captures novelty preference as a function of visual recognition memory.

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated associations between phthalate metabolite concentrations in maternal prenatal urine and cognition in infancy using the FTII at 27 weeks and determine if these associations are sex-specific.

METHODS: Mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), monoisobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP) and four di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate metabolites (DEHP) were quantified in urine samples collected from 168 minority women living in urban neighborhoods during their third trimester of pregnancy. The FTII was administered to infants at 27 weeks to measure visual recognition memory and was recorded as the novelty preference score.

RESULTS: There were no associations between prenatal phthalate metabolite concentrations and novelty preference score in the full sample. However, there was evidence of effect modification by infant sex. Sex-stratified models demonstrated that compared to girls in the lowest tertile of MBzP concentrations, girls in tertiles 2 and 3 had, on average, 3.98 and 4.65 points lower novelty preference scores (p-value=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The relationship was similar for ΣDEHP, MiBP, and MEP. Effects among boys were inconsistent and generally not significant.

CONCLUSION: Maternal prenatal exposure to some phthalates was negatively associated with visual recognition memory as measured by the FTII among girls at age 27 weeks.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Prenatal phthalate biomarker concentrations and performance on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II in a population of young urban children

Authors: Doherty, BT; Engel, SM; Buckley, JP; Silva, MJ; Calafat, AM; Wolff, MS (2017) Environmental Research 152:51-58. HERO ID: 3469358

[Less] INTRODUCTION: Evidence suggests prenatal phthalate exposures may have neurodevelopmental . . . [More] INTRODUCTION: Evidence suggests prenatal phthalate exposures may have neurodevelopmental consequences. Our objective was to investigate prenatal exposure to phthalates and cognitive development in a cohort of young urban children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We recruited pregnant women in New York City from 1998 to 2002 and measured concentrations of nine phthalate metabolites in urine collected in late pregnancy. We administered a neurodevelopmental screening instrument, the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID-II), to children who returned for follow-up at approximately 24 months (n=276). We estimated associations between phthalate metabolite concentrations in maternal urine and BSID-II indices (Mental Development Index (MDI), Psychomotor Development Index (PDI)).

RESULTS: We observed no associations between phthalate metabolite concentrations and performance on the MDI or PDI in boys and girls combined. We did, however, observe evidence of effect measure modification by sex. We observed several negative associations between metabolite concentrations and both MDI and PDI scores among girls, suggesting poorer performance across multiple metabolites, with estimates equal to a 2-3 point decrease in score per ln-unit increase in creatinine-standardized metabolite concentration. Conversely, we observed multiple weakly positive associations among boys, equal to a 1-2 point increase in score per ln-unit increase in metabolite concentration. The strongest associations were for the metabolites mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-isobutyl phthalate, monobenzyl phthalate, and mono(3-carboxylpropyl) phthalate (MCPP).

CONCLUSIONS: Girls of mothers with higher urinary concentrations of MCPP and metabolites of dibutyl phthalates had lower MDI scores on the BSID-II. These same biomarker concentrations were often associated with improved scores among boys. We observed similar results for MnBP, MCPP, and MBzP on the PDI. Given the prevalence of phthalate exposures in reproductive aged women, the implications of potential neurotoxicity warrant further investigation.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Gestational and lactational exposure to di-isobutyl phthalate via diet in maternal mice decreases testosterone levels in male offspring

Authors: Wang, X; Sheng, N; Cui, R; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Dai, J (2017) Chemosphere 172:260-267. HERO ID: 3483278

[Less] Phthalates are a large family of ubiquitous environmental chemicals suspected of being endocrine disruptors, . . . [More] Phthalates are a large family of ubiquitous environmental chemicals suspected of being endocrine disruptors, with exposure to these chemicals during prenatal and postnatal development possibly resulting in reproductive disorders. Di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) is widely used in consumer and industrial products, and although its exposure in the general population has increased in recent years, the mechanisms behind DiBP-induced reproductive disorders in male offspring remain unclear. Here, pregnant mice were exposed to 0 or 450 mg/kg bw/day DiBP via diet from gestation day (GD) 0 to GD21. Until postnatal day 21 (PD21), half of the exposed pups were also exposed to DiBP by lactation (TT), while the rest were not (TC). Half of each group were sacrificed on PD21, with the remaining mice fed a normal diet until PD80 (TCC and TTC, respectively). Reproductive toxicological parameters such as relative organ weights and testosterone levels were determined in male offspring on PD21 and PD80 and sperm quality was tested on PD80. Maternal exposure (pregnancy and lactation) led to decreased serum and testis testosterone concentrations, accompanied by decreased expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A member 1 (CYP11A1) in PD21 pups and PD80 adults. Furthermore, the TTC group showed decreased epididymis sperm concentration and motility. Taken together, DiBP exposure in early life (prenatal and postnatal) impaired male reproductive function in later life, possibly by interfering with testosterone levels and CYP11A1, which might be a major steroidogenic enzyme targeted by DiBP or other phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Estimating uptake of phthalate ester metabolites into the human nail plate using pharmacokinetic modelling

Authors: Bui, TT; Alves, A; Palm-Cousins, A; Voorspoels, S; Covaci, A; Cousins, IT (2017) Environment International 100:148–155. HERO ID: 3483277

[Less] There is a lack of knowledge regarding uptake of phthalate esters (PEs) and other chemicals into the . . . [More] There is a lack of knowledge regarding uptake of phthalate esters (PEs) and other chemicals into the human nail plate and thus, clarity concerning the suitability of human nails as a valid alternative matrix for monitoring long-term exposure. In particular, the relative importance of internal uptake of phthalate metabolites (from e.g. blood) compared to external uptake pathways is unknown. This study provides first insights into the partitioning of phthalate-metabolites between blood and nail using pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling and biomonitoring data from a Norwegian cohort. A previously published PK model (Lorber PK model) was used in combination with measured urine data to predict serum concentrations of DEHP and DnBP/DiBP metabolites at steady state. Then, partitioning between blood and nail was assessed assuming equilibrium conditions and treating the nail plate as a tissue, assuming a fixed lipid and water content. Although calculated as a worst-case scenario at equilibrium, the predicted nail concentrations of metabolites were lower than the biomonitoring data by factors of 44 to 1300 depending on the metabolite. It is therefore concluded that internal uptake of phthalate metabolites from blood into nail is a negligible pathway and does not explain the observed nail concentrations. Instead, external uptake pathways are more likely to dominate, possibly through deposition of phthalates onto the skin/nail and subsequent metabolism. Modelling gaseous diffusive uptake of PEs from air to nail revealed that this pathway is unlikely to be important. Experimental quantification of internal and external uptake pathways of phthalates and their metabolites into the human nail plate is needed to verify these modelling results. However, based on this model, human nails are not a good indicator of internal human exposure for the phthalate esters studied.