Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Diisobutyl Phthalate (DIBP) Final

Show Project Details Hide Project Details
740 References Were Found:

Journal Article
Journal Article

Chemical characterization, antioxidant and inhibitory effects of some marine sponges against carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes

Authors: Shaaban, M; Abd-Alla, HI; Hassan, AZ; Aly, HF; Ghani, MA (In Press) . HERO ID: 1292151

[Less] ABSTRACT: The present research was performed to investigate the effects of the extracts of four marine . . . [More] ABSTRACT: The present research was performed to investigate the effects of the extracts of four marine sponges on some biochemical parameters including antioxidant and three different carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes: alpha-Amylase, beta-galactosidase and alpha-glucosidase. The sponges were collected from Red Sea at Egyptian coasts, and taxonomically belonged to the genus of Smenospongia (SP1), Callyspongia (SP2), Niphates (SP3) and Stylissa (SP4), respectively. The sponges extracts exhibited diverse inhibitory effects on oxidative stress indices and carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in linear relationships to some extent with concentration of inhibitors (dose dependant). The extracts of sponges (3, 1 and 2) showed, respectively, potent reducing power. Chemical characterization of sponge 1 recognized the existence of di-isobutyl phthalate (1), di-nbutyl phthalate (2), linoleic acid (3), beta-sitosterol (4) and cholesterol (5), while sponge 3 produced bis-[2-ethyl]-hexyl-phthylester (6) and triglyceride fatty acid ester (7).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Occurrence and Profiles of Phthalates in Foodstuffs from China and Their Implications for Human Exposure

Authors: Guo, Y; Zhang, Z; Liu, L; Li, Y; Ren, N; Kannan, K (In Press) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. HERO ID: 1311703

[Less] Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of . . . [More] Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of compounds is widespread. Nevertheless, studies on dietary exposure of humans to phthalates are limited. In this study, nine phthalate esters were analyzed in eight categories of foodstuffs (n = 78) collected from Harbin and Shanghai, China, in 2011. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BzBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were frequently detected in food samples. DEHP was the major compound found in most of the food samples, with concentrations that ranged from below the limit of quantification (LOQ) to 762 ng/g wet weight (wt). The concentrations of phthalates in food samples from China were comparable to concentrations reported for several other countries, but the profiles were different; DMP was found more frequently in Chinese foods than in foods from other countries. The estimated daily dietary intake of phthalates (EDI(diet)) was calculated based on the concentrations measured and the daily ingestion rates of food items. The EDI(diet) values for DMP, DEP, DIBP, DBP, BzBP, and DEHP (based on mean concentrations) were 0.092, 0.051, 0.505, 0.703, 0.022, and 1.60 μg/kg-bw/d, respectively, for Chinese adults. The EDI(diet) values calculated for phthalates were below the reference doses suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Comparison of total daily intakes, reported previously based on a biomonitoring study, with the current dietary intake estimates suggests that diet is the main source of DEHP exposure in China. Nevertheless, diet accounted for only <10% of the total exposure to DMP, DEP, DBP, and DIBP, which suggested the existence of other sources of exposure to these phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effect of aminosilane compounds as external donors on isospecific polymerizations of 1-butene with MgCl2/TiCl4/DIBP catalyst

Authors: Yan, Y; Ren, H; Li, L; Xu, Y (2017) Catalysis Letters 147:221-227. HERO ID: 3859037

[Less] Four aminosilane compounds were synthesized and employed as external electron donors for 1-butene polymerization . . . [More] Four aminosilane compounds were synthesized and employed as external electron donors for 1-butene polymerization with MgCl2 supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst. The four aminosilane compounds are di(piperidinyl)dimethoxysilane (DPPDMS), di(piperidinyl)- diethoxysilane (DPPDES), di(pyrrolidinyl)dimethoxysilane (DPRDMS) and di(pyrrolidinyl)- diethoxysilane (DPRDES). A detailed study has been performed on the effects of the chemical structure of different external electron donors on the catalytic efficiency, isotacticity, melting temperature and molecular weight distribution of obtained poly(1-butene). Poly(1-butene) products have been characterized with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results indicated that: first, aminosilane compounds with dimethoxy groups showed higher catalytic efficiency and polymers isospecificity than those of with diethoxy groups. Conversely, the aminosilane compounds with diethoxy groups were conductive to obtaining polymers with broader molecular weight distribution than those of with dimethoxy groups. Second, compared with single DPPDMS or TEOS (tetraethyl orthosilicate), DPPDMS/TEOS complex in a proper molar ratio would not only increase the catalytic efficiency and isotacticity of obtained polymers, but also broaden the molecular weight distribution of polymers. Third, the effects of other factors on catalytic efficiency and isotacticity of polymers product were also studied, including different amount of hydrogen, concentration of external donor and cocatalyst.



Di(piperidinyl)dimethoxysilane (DPPDMS) was synthesized and employed as external electron donors for 1-butene polymerization with MgCl2 supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Compared with single DPPDMS or TEOS (tetraethyl orthosilicate), DPPDMS/TEOS complex in a proper molar ratio would not only increase the catalytic efficiency and isotacticity of obtained polymers, but also broaden the molecular weight distribution of polymers. The selection of molar ratio should depend on the requirements to the polymer.



[GRAPHICS]

Journal Article
Journal Article

Doubly nonparametric sparse nonnegative matrix factorization based on dependent Indian buffet processes

Authors: Xuan, J; Lu, J; Zhang, G; Xu, RYD; Luo, X (2017) . HERO ID: 3859070

[Less] Sparse nonnegative matrix factorization (SNMF) aims to factorize a data matrix into two optimized nonnegative . . . [More] Sparse nonnegative matrix factorization (SNMF) aims to factorize a data matrix into two optimized nonnegative sparse factor matrices, which could benefit many tasks, such as document-word co-clustering. However, the traditional SNMF typically assumes the number of latent factors (i.e., dimensionality of the factor matrices) to be fixed. This assumption makes it inflexible in practice. In this paper, we propose a doubly sparse nonparametric NMF framework to mitigate this issue by using dependent Indian buffet processes (dIBP). We apply a correlation function for the generation of two stick weights associated with each column pair of factor matrices while still maintaining their respective marginal distribution specified by IBP. As a consequence, the generation of two factor matrices will be columnwise correlated. Under this framework, two classes of correlation function are proposed: 1) using bivariate Beta distribution and 2) using Copula function. Compared with the single IBP-based NMF, this paper jointly makes two factor matrices nonparametric and sparse, which could be applied to broader scenarios, such as co-clustering. This paper is seen to be much more flexible than Gaussian process-based and hierarchial Beta process-based dIBPs in terms of allowing the two corresponding binary matrix columns to have greater variations in their nonzero entries. Our experiments on synthetic data show the merits of this paper compared with the state-of-the-art models in respect of factorization efficiency, sparsity, and flexibility. Experiments on real-world data sets demonstrate the efficiency of this paper in document-word co-clustering tasks.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phthalate-induced oxidative stress and association with asthma-related airway inflammation in adolescents: Supplementary materials

Authors: Franken, C; Lambrechts, N; Govarts, E; Koppen, G; Den Hond, E; Ooms, D; Voorspoels, S; Bruckers, L; Loots, I; Nelen, V; Sioen, I; Nawrot, TS; Baeyens, W; Van Larebeke, N; Schoeters, G (2017) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 220. [Supplemental Data] HERO ID: 4135202

Abstract: Supplementary materials

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Urinary levels of phthalate metabolites and associations with demographic characteristics in Korean adults

Authors: Lee, KM; Kho, Y; Kim, PG; Park, SH; Lee, JH (2017) Environmental Science and Pollution Research 24:14669-14681. HERO ID: 3859032

[Less] The objective of this study is to assess human exposure to phthalates and its associations with demographic . . . [More] The objective of this study is to assess human exposure to phthalates and its associations with demographic characteristics of the subjects in the Korean National Human Biomonitoring Survey. The subjects aged between 18 and 69 were selected through nationwide stratified sampling. A total of 1874 urine samples were collected and stored at -20 °C until measurement for ten selected metabolites of phthalates (MnBP, MiBP, MBzP, MCHP, MnOP, MEHP, MEOHP, MEHHP, MiNP, and MiDP) using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The difference in the level of urinary phthalate metabolites by the characteristics of the subjects was tested for statistical significance using SAS Surveyreg procedure. The coefficients and standard errors from multiple linear regressions were exponentiated to estimate the adjusted proportional change (APC) and 95% CIs compared with a referent level. The proportion of data above LOQ was less than 20% for MCHP, MnOP, MiNP, and MiDP. Geometric means of creatinine-adjusted concentrations (unit: μg/g creatinine) of six other phthalate metabolites among Korean adults were 41.7 (95% CI 39.6-43.9) for MnBP, 17.1 (95% CI 16.1-18.1) for MiBP, 15.7 (95% CI 14.4-17.1) for MBzP, 8.65 (95% CI 8.10-9.22) for MEHP, 17.5 (95% CI 16.8-18.3) for MEOHP, and 38.1 (95% CI 36.2-40.2) for MEHHP. Urinary level of phthalates tended to be higher among subjects with older age, females, and those with vigorous daily physical activity and tended to be lower among drinkers and those with higher income. Our results suggest that the level of phthalate exposure is significant among Korean adults and thus warrants further studies to identify major source and route of exposure to phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Maternal urinary phthalates and sex-specific placental mRNA levels in an urban birth cohort

Authors: Adibi, JJ; Buckley, JP; Lee, MK; Williams, PL; Just, AC; Zhao, Y; Bhat, HK; Whyatt, RM (2017) Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source 16:35. HERO ID: 3859023

[Less] BACKGROUND: Prenatal urinary concentrations of phthalates in women participants in . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Prenatal urinary concentrations of phthalates in women participants in an urban birth cohort were associated with outcomes in their children related to neurodevelopment, autoimmune disease risk, and fat mass at 3,5,7, and 8 years of life. Placental biomarkers and outcomes at birth may offer biologic insight into these associations. This is the first study to address these associations with candidate genes from the phthalate and placenta literature, accounting for sex differences, and using absolute quantitation methods for mRNA levels.

METHODS: We measured candidate mRNAs in 180 placentas sampled at birth (HSD17B1, AHR, CGA, CYP19A1, SLC27A4, PTGS2, PPARG, CYP11A1) by quantitative PCR and an absolute standard curve. We estimated associations of loge mRNA with quartiles of urinary phthalate monoesters using linear mixed models. Phthalate metabolites (N = 358) and mRNAs (N = 180) were transformed to a z-score and modeled as independent, correlated vectors in relation to large for gestational age (LGA) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

RESULTS: CGA was associated with 4 out of 6 urinary phthalates. CGA was 2.0 loge units lower at the 3(rd) vs. 1(st) quartile of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.5, -0.5) in male placentas, but 0.6 loge units higher (95% CI: -0.8, 1.9) in female placentas (sex interaction p = 0.01). There was an inverse association of MnBP with PPARG in male placentas (-1.1 loge units at highest vs. lowest quartile, 95% CI: -2.0, -0.1). CY19A1, CYP11A1, CGA were associated with one or more of the following in a sex-specific manner: monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), MnBP, mono-iso-butyl phthalate (MiBP). These 3 mRNAs were lower by 1.4-fold (95% CI: -2.4, -1.0) in male GDM placentas vs. female and non-GDM placentas (p-value for interaction = 0.04). The metabolites MnBP/MiBP were 16% higher (95% CI: 0, 22) in GDM pregnancies.

CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal concentrations of certain phthalates and outcomes at birth were modestly associated with molecular changes in fetal placental tissue during pregnancy. Associations were stronger in male vs. female placentas, and associations with MnBP and MiBP were stronger than other metabolites. Placental mRNAs are being pursued further as potential mediators of exposure-induced risks to the health of the child.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Gestational and lactational exposure to di-isobutyl phthalate via diet in maternal mice decreases testosterone levels in male offspring

Authors: Wang, X; Sheng, N; Cui, R; Zhang, H; Wang, J; Dai, J (2017) Chemosphere 172:260-267. HERO ID: 3483278

[Less] Phthalates are a large family of ubiquitous environmental chemicals suspected of being endocrine disruptors, . . . [More] Phthalates are a large family of ubiquitous environmental chemicals suspected of being endocrine disruptors, with exposure to these chemicals during prenatal and postnatal development possibly resulting in reproductive disorders. Di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) is widely used in consumer and industrial products, and although its exposure in the general population has increased in recent years, the mechanisms behind DiBP-induced reproductive disorders in male offspring remain unclear. Here, pregnant mice were exposed to 0 or 450 mg/kg bw/day DiBP via diet from gestation day (GD) 0 to GD21. Until postnatal day 21 (PD21), half of the exposed pups were also exposed to DiBP by lactation (TT), while the rest were not (TC). Half of each group were sacrificed on PD21, with the remaining mice fed a normal diet until PD80 (TCC and TTC, respectively). Reproductive toxicological parameters such as relative organ weights and testosterone levels were determined in male offspring on PD21 and PD80 and sperm quality was tested on PD80. Maternal exposure (pregnancy and lactation) led to decreased serum and testis testosterone concentrations, accompanied by decreased expression of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A member 1 (CYP11A1) in PD21 pups and PD80 adults. Furthermore, the TTC group showed decreased epididymis sperm concentration and motility. Taken together, DiBP exposure in early life (prenatal and postnatal) impaired male reproductive function in later life, possibly by interfering with testosterone levels and CYP11A1, which might be a major steroidogenic enzyme targeted by DiBP or other phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Estimated daily intake and cumulative risk assessment of phthalates in the general Taiwanese after the 2011 DEHP food scandal

Authors: Chang, JW; Lee, CC; Pan, WH; Chou, WC; Huang, HB; Chiang, HC; Huang, PC (2017) Scientific Reports 7:45009. HERO ID: 3859025

[Less] A food scandal occurred in Taiwan in 2011 because the DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) had been intentionally . . . [More] A food scandal occurred in Taiwan in 2011 because the DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) had been intentionally used in food products. We assessed the daily intakes (DIs) and cumulative risk of phthalates in Taiwan's general population after the scandal. The DIs of 6 phthalates, including di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), and DEHP, were evaluated using urinary phthalate metabolites. Hazard quotients of phthalates classified as affecting the reproductive (HQrep) and hepatic (HQhep) systems were assessed using cumulative approach. The creatinine-based model showed that the highest DI values in children 7-to 12- years-old were for DEHP (males: median: 4.79 μg/kg bw/d; females: median: 2.62 μg/kg bw/d). The 95(th) percentile (P95) of HQrep values were all >1 in the 7- to 12-year-old and 18- to 40-year-old male groups. The P95 of HQhep values were all >1 in the 7- to 18- year-old male groups. Most of the HQrep was attributable to the HQs of DnBP and DiBP (53.9-84.7%), and DEHP contributed most to HQhep (83.1-98.6%), which reveals that DnBP, DiBP and DEHP were the main risk of phthalate exposure for Taiwanese. Taiwan's general population is widely exposed to DnBP, DiBP and DEHP, especially for young children.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Prenatal exposure to an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture disrupts reproduction in F1 female mice

Authors: Zhou, C; Gao, L; Flaws, JA (2017) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 318:49-57. HERO ID: 3494367

[Less] Phthalates are used in a large variety of products, such as building materials, medical devices, and . . . [More] Phthalates are used in a large variety of products, such as building materials, medical devices, and personal care products. Most previous studies on the toxicity of phthalates have focused on single phthalates, but it is also important to study the effects of phthalate mixtures because humans are exposed to phthalate mixtures. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture adversely affects female reproduction in mice. To test this hypothesis, pregnant CD-1 dams were orally dosed with vehicle (tocopherol-stripped corn oil) or a phthalate mixture (20 and 200μg/kg/day, 200 and 500mg/kg/day) daily from gestational day 10 to birth. The mixture was based on the composition of phthalates detected in urine samples from pregnant women in Illinois. The mixture included 35% diethyl phthalate, 21% di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 15% dibutyl phthalate, 15% diisononyl phthalate, 8% diisobutyl phthalate, and 5% benzylbutyl phthalate. Female mice born to the exposed dams were subjected to tissue collections and fertility tests at different ages. Our results indicate that prenatal exposure to the phthalate mixture significantly increased uterine weight and decreased anogenital distance on postnatal days 8 and 60, induced cystic ovaries at 13months, disrupted estrous cyclicity, reduced fertility-related indices, and caused some breeding complications at 3, 6, and 9months of age. Collectively, our data suggest that prenatal exposure to an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture disrupts aspects of female reproduction in mice.