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Diisobutyl Phthalate (DIBP) Final

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286 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Unraveling the Relative Importance of Oral and Dermal Contaminant Exposure in Reptiles: Insights from Studies Using the Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

Authors: Weir, SM; Talent, LG; Anderson, TA; Salice, CJ (2014) PLoS ONE 9:e99666. HERO ID: 2345947

[Less] Despite widespread recognition of significant data deficiencies, reptiles remain a relatively understudied . . . [More] Despite widespread recognition of significant data deficiencies, reptiles remain a relatively understudied taxon in ecotoxicology. To conduct ecological risk assessments on reptiles frequently requires using surrogate taxa such as birds, but recent research suggests that reptiles have significantly different exposure profiles and toxicant sensitivity. We exposed western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis, to the same quantities of three model chemicals via oral (gavage) and dermal (ventral skin application) exposure for either 24 or 48 hours. Three phthalate esters (di-methyl phthalate [DMP], di-iso-butyl phthalate [DIBP], and di-n-octyl phthalate [DNOP]) were chosen as model chemicals because they represent a gradient of lipophilicity but are otherwise structurally similar. Overall, the more lipophilic phthalates (DIBP and DNOP) were found to have higher concentrations in tissues than the less lipophilic DMP. Significant differences in tissue concentrations between DIBP and DNOP were tissue-dependent, suggesting that delivery to a site of action following exposure is not only a simple function of lipophilicity. In dermal treatments, DMP usually had fewer detections (except in ventral skin samples), suggesting that lipophilicity (log Kow>2) is a requirement for uptake across the skin. In general, tissue residues were greater in oral treatments than dermal treatments (significant in adipose and liver tissue), but differences were driven strongly by differences in DMP which did not appear to be absorbed well across skin. When differences in tissue residue concentrations between oral and dermal exposure did occur, the difference was not drastic. Taken together these results suggest that dermal exposure should be considered in risk assessments for reptilian receptors. Dermal exposure may be an especially important route for reptiles as their ectothermic physiology translates to lower energetic demands and dietary exposure compared to birds and mammals.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Preliminary toxicological assessment of phthalate esters from drinking water consumed in Portugal

Authors: Santana, J; Giraudi, C; Marengo, E; Robotti, E; Pires, S; Nunes, I; Gaspar, EM (2014) Environmental Science and Pollution Research 21:1380-1390. HERO ID: 2000822

[Less] This paper reports, for the first time, the concentrations of selected phthalates in drinking water . . . [More] This paper reports, for the first time, the concentrations of selected phthalates in drinking water consumed in Portugal. The use of bottled water in Portugal has increased in recent years. The main material for bottles is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Its plasticizer components can contaminate water by leaching, and several scientific studies have evidenced potential health risks of phthalates to humans of all ages. With water being one of the most essential elements to human health and because it is consumed by ingestion, the evaluation of drinking water quality, with respect to phthalate contents, is important. This study tested seven commercial brands of bottled water consumed in Portugal, six PET and one glass (the most consumed) bottled water. Furthermore, tap water from Lisbon and three small neighbor cities was analyzed. Phthalates (di-n-butyl phthalate ester (DnBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate ester (DEHP), and di-i-butyl phthalate ester (DIBP)) in water samples were quantified (PET and glass) by means of direct immersion solid-phase microextraction and ionic liquid gas chromatography associated with flame ionization detection or mass spectrometry due to their high boiling points and water solubility. The method utilized in this study showed a linear range for target phthalates between 0.02 and 6.5 μg L(-1), good precision and low limits of detection that were between 0.01 and 0.06 μg L(-1), and quantitation between 0.04 and 0.19 μg L(-1). Only three phthalates were detected in Portuguese drinking waters: dibutyl (DnBP), diisobutyl (DIBP), and di(ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Concentrations ranged between 0.06 and 6.5 μg L(-1) for DnBP, between 0.02 and 0.16 μg L(-1) for DEHP, and between 0.1 and 1.89 μg L(-1) for DIBP. The concentration of DEHP was found to be up to five times higher in PET than in glass bottled water. Surprisingly, all the three phthalates were detected in glass bottled water with the amount of DnBP being higher (6.5 μg L(-1)) than in PET bottled water. These concentrations do not represent direct risk to human health. Regarding potable tap water, only DIBP and DEHP were detected. Two of the cities showed concentration of all three phthalates in their water below the limits of detection of the method. All the samples showed phthalate concentrations below 6 μg L(-1), the maximum admissible concentration in water established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The concentrations measured in Portuguese bottled waters do not represent any risk for adult's health.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Prenatal phthalate exposures and neurobehavioral development scores in boys and girls at 6-10 years of age

Authors: Kobrosly, RW; Evans, S; Miodovnik, A; Barrett, ES; Thurston, SW; Calafat, AM; Swan, SH (2014) Environmental Health Perspectives 122:521-528. HERO ID: 2241684

[Less] BACKGROUND: There is concern over potential neurobehavioral effects of prenatal phthalate . . . [More] BACKGROUND: There is concern over potential neurobehavioral effects of prenatal phthalate exposures, but available data are inconsistent.

OBJECTIVES: To examine associations between prenatal urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites and neurobehavioral scores among children.

METHODS: We measured phthalate metabolite concentrations in urine samples from 153 pregnant participants in the Study for Future Families, a multicenter cohort study. Mothers completed the Child Behavior Checklist when the children were 6-10 years of age. We estimated overall and sex-specific associations between phthalate concentrations and behavior using adjusted multiple regression interaction models.

RESULTS: In boys concentrations of mono-isobutyl phthalate were associated with higher scores for inattention (β = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.50), rule-breaking behavior (β = 0.20; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.38), aggression (β = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.09, 0.59), and conduct problems (β = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.20, 0.58), while the molar sum of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites was associated with higher scores for somatic problems (β = 0.15; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.28). Higher monobenzyl phthalate concentrations were associated with higher scores for oppositional behavior (β = 0.16; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.32) and conduct problems (β = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.37) in boys, but with reduced anxiety scores in girls (β = -0.20; 95% CI: -0.39, -0.01). In general, the associations reported above were close to the null among girls. Model coefficients represent the difference in the square-root transformed outcome score associated with a 1-unit increase in log-transformed metabolites.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest associations between exposure to certain phthalates in late pregnancy and behavioral problems in boys. Given the few studies on this topic and methodological and population differences among studies, additional research is warranted.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phthalate intake by infants calculated from biomonitoring data

Authors: Völkel, W; Kiranoglu, M; Schuster, R; Fromme, H; HBMnet (2014) Toxicology Letters 225:222-229. HERO ID: 2219808

[Less] Urine samples (n=207) of 47 infants between 1- and 5-month of age were quantitated for 12 metabolites . . . [More] Urine samples (n=207) of 47 infants between 1- and 5-month of age were quantitated for 12 metabolites of 7 phthalates and compared with samples collected from the mothers of the infants at different time points. Median and 95-percentile were lower for all metabolites in urine samples of infants compared to mothers. For di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) the 95-percentile daily intake was 23.3μg/kg b.w. for mothers and 5.4μg/kg b.w. for infants and for di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) 10.1μg/kg b.w. and 8.5μg/kg b.w. Some values exceeded the corresponding tolerable daily intake (TDI) for DiBP for infants and mothers and for DEHP and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) only for mothers. Both, infants and mothers are able to efficiently form phase II metabolites but infants with a slightly lower degree. Therefore, a distinguished risk assessment with respect to the formed toxic metabolites of phthalates would be necessary in combination with a reduction of the most toxic phthalates.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Intake estimates of phthalate esters for South Delhi population based on exposure media assessment

Authors: Das, MT; Ghosh, P; Thakur, IS (2014) Environmental Pollution 189:118-125. HERO ID: 2298077

[Less] An indirect estimation method was followed to derive exposure levels of fifteen phthalate congeners . . . [More] An indirect estimation method was followed to derive exposure levels of fifteen phthalate congeners in urban population of Delhi, India. The exposure media samples were collected from Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) campus and Okhla industrial area. GC-MS analysis of the samples indicated di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) to be the most abundant congener and its estimated total daily intake level reached upto 70 μg kg(-1) d(-1). Out of the studied congeners, intake doses for di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) and DEHP, reached levels near or above the established exposure limit. In JNU, DEHP, dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) had 69% share in combined daily intake of Σ15 phthalates (CDI15); whereas, in Okhla, DEHP, diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), DnBP and DMP shared 64% of the CDI15. Food was found to be the major source of exposure contributing 67% and 74% of the estimated CDI15 at JNU and Okhla respectively.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations among pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico: Distribution, temporal variability, and predictors

Authors: Cantonwine, DE; Cordero, JF; Rivera-González, LO; Anzalota Del Toro, LV; Ferguson, KK; Mukherjee, B; Calafat, AM; Crespo, N; Jiménez-Vélez, B; Padilla, IY; Alshawabkeh, AN; Meeker, JD (2014) Environment International 62:1-11. HERO ID: 2215404

[Less] BACKGROUND: Phthalate contamination exists in the North Coast karst aquifer system . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Phthalate contamination exists in the North Coast karst aquifer system in Puerto Rico. In light of potential health impacts associated with phthalate exposure, targeted action for elimination of exposure sources may be warranted, especially for sensitive populations such as pregnant women. However, information on exposure to phthalates from a variety of sources in Puerto Rico is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine concentrations and predictors of urinary phthalate biomarkers measured at multiple times during pregnancy among women living in the Northern karst area of Puerto Rico.

METHODS: We recruited 139 pregnant women in Northern Puerto Rico and collected urine samples and questionnaire data at three separate visits (18±2weeks, 22±2weeks, and 26±2weeks of gestation). Urine samples were analyzed for eleven phthalate metabolites: mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate, mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-benzyl phthalate, mono-isobutyl phthalate, mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate (MCPP), mono carboxyisononyl phthalate (MCNP), and mono carboxyisooctyl phthalate (MCOP).

RESULTS: Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites among pregnant women living in Puerto Rico was prevalent, and metabolite concentrations tended to be higher than or similar to those measured in women of reproductive age from the general US population. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from very weak (MCNP; 0.05) to moderate (MEP; 0.44) reproducibility among all phthalate metabolites. We observed significant or suggestive positive associations between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and water usage/storage habits (MEP, MCNP, MCOP), use of personal care products (MEP), and consumption of certain food items (MCPP, MCNP, and MCOP).

CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this is the first study to report concentrations, temporal variability, and predictors of phthalate biomarkers among pregnant women in Puerto Rico. Preliminary results suggest several potentially important exposure sources to phthalates in this population and future analysis from this ongoing prospective cohort will help to inform targeted approaches to reduce exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phthalate exposure and child development: The Polish Mother and Child Cohort Study

Authors: Polanska, K; Ligocka, D; Sobala, W; Hanke, W (2014) Early Human Development 90:477-485. HERO ID: 2347467

[Less] BACKGROUND: Widespread phthalate exposure has prompted investigations concerning their . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Widespread phthalate exposure has prompted investigations concerning their potential adverse health effects.

AIM: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre and early postnatal phthalate exposure on child psychomotor development based on the data from the prospective Polish Mother and Child Cohort Study (REPRO PL).

STUDY DESIGN, SUBJECTS AND OUTCOME MEASURES: Phthalate exposure was determined by measuring 11 phthalate metabolites (MEP, MiBP, MnBP, 3OH-MnBP, MBzP, MEHP, 5OH-MEHP, 5oxo-MEHP, OH-MiNP, oxo-MiNP, and MnOP) in the urine collected from mothers during the third trimester of pregnancy (prenatal exposure) and from their children at the 24th month of age (postnatal exposure). The analysis was performed by the HPLC-MS/MS method. Psychomotor development was assessed in children at the age of 2years by the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development.

RESULTS: Child motor development was inversely associated with natural log concentrations (μg/g creatinine) of 3OH-MnBP (β= -2.3; 95% CI -4.0 to -0.6), 5OH-MEHP (β= -1.2; 95% CI -2.2 to -0.3), 5oxo-MEHP (β= -1.8; 95% CI -3.3 to -0.2) and sum of DEHP metabolites (β= -2.2; 95% CI -3.6 to -0.8), DnBP metabolites (β= -1.9; 95% CI -3.4 to -0.4), and high molecular weight phthalates (β= -2.5; 95% CI -4.1 to -0.9) in the urine collected from mothers during pregnancy after adjustment for a variety of potential confounders. Additional adjustment for postnatal phthalate exposure did not change the results. Postnatal child exposure to phthalates was not associated with any of the measured scores of child psychomotor development.

CONCLUSIONS: The study findings add further support to the possibility that prenatal phthalate exposure may be detrimental to child neurodevelopment and underscore the importance of policies and public health interventions aiming at reduction of such exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Phthalate metabolites in urine samples from Danish children and correlations with phthalates in dust samples from their homes and daycare centers

Authors: Langer, S; Bekö, G; Weschler, CJ; Brive, LM; Toftum, J; Callesen, M; Clausen, G (2014) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 217:78-87. HERO ID: 1600114

[Less] Around the world humans use products that contain phthalates, and human exposure to certain of these . . . [More] Around the world humans use products that contain phthalates, and human exposure to certain of these phthalates has been associated with various adverse health effects. The aim of the present study has been to determine the concentrations of the metabolites of diethyl phthalate (DEP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP), di(iso-butyl) phthalate (DiBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in urine samples from 441 Danish children (3-6 years old). These children were subjects in the Danish Indoor Environment and Children's Health study. As part of each child's medical examination, a sample from his or her first morning urination was collected. These samples were subsequently analyzed for metabolites of the targeted phthalates. The measured concentrations of each metabolite were approximately log-normally distributed, and the metabolite concentrations significantly correlated with one another. Additionally, the mass fractions of DEP, DnBP, DiBP and BBzP in dust collected from the children's bedrooms and daycare centers significantly correlated with the concentrations of these phthalates' metabolites (monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP) and monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP), respectively) in the children's urine. Such correlations indicate that indoor exposures meaningfully contributed to the Danish children's intake of DEP, DnBP, DiBP and BBzP. This was not the case for DEHP. The urine concentrations of the phthalate metabolites measured in the present study were remarkably similar to those measured in urine samples from children living in countries distributed over four continents. These similarities reflect the globalization of children's exposure to phthalate containing products.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Simultaneous determination of some phthalate metabolites, parabens and benzophenone-3 in urine by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

Authors: Dewalque, L; Pirard, C; Dubois, N; Charlier, C (2014) Journal of Chromatography B, Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences 949-950:37-47. HERO ID: 2241687

[Less] Phthalates, parabens and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone or benzophone-3 are thought to act as endocrine . . . [More] Phthalates, parabens and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone or benzophone-3 are thought to act as endocrine disrupting chemicals, being able to disrupt the endocrine balance and therefore able to lead to some hormonal diseases. Numerous large-scale biomonitoring studies have detected the biomarkers of these compounds in more than 75% of the general population. To assess the exposure to these chemicals, we developed an analytical method based on a Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) prior to ultra high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous measurement of seven phthalate metabolites (monobenzyl phthalate, mono-n-butyl phthalate, mono-iso-butyl phthalate, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate, monoethyl phthalate), four parabens (methyl paraben, ethyl paraben, n-propyl paraben, n-butyl parabens) and benzophenone-3 in human urine. The distinction between unconjugated, glucuro- and sulfoconjugated forms was achieved using different enzymatic hydrolyses. The whole procedure was validated according to the total error approach, and was demonstrated to be linear (regression coefficient ranging from 0.987 to 0.998) and accurate (inter and intra assay precision <17.71%, relative bias <5.87%) in the dosing range of concentrations. The limits of quantification (LOQs) obtained ranged between 0.30 and 1.23ng/ml depending on the analyte. The reliability of the method was proven in passing successfully the German External Quality Assessment Scheme (G-EQUAS). Moreover, the urine from 25 volunteers were analyzed for the determination of glucuro-, sulfo- and free species separately. Phthalate metabolites, parabens and benzophenone-3 were positively detected in almost all urine samples, with detection rates ranging from 40 to 100%. Levels measured ranged from <LOQ to 2207ng/ml varying widely depending on the compound and the individual. In our small participating population, most of the phthalate metabolites were excreted predominately as glucuroconjugated forms while parabens and benzophenone-3 were detected as glucuro- and sulfoconjugated species in variable proportions according to the target compound.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Age and sex differences in childhood and adulthood obesity association with phthalates: analyses of NHANES 2007-2010

Authors: Buser, MC; Murray, HE; Scinicariello, F (2014) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 217:687-694. HERO ID: 5765903

[Less] BACKGROUNDExposure to environmental chemicals may play a role in the development of obesity. Evidence . . . [More] BACKGROUNDExposure to environmental chemicals may play a role in the development of obesity. Evidence suggests phthalate exposure may be associated with obesity in children and adults.OBJECTIVETo examine the association of ten urinary phthalate metabolites mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP), mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl phthalate (MECPP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (MEHHP), mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), mono-(carboxylnonyl) phthalate (MCNP), and mono-(carboxyoctyl) phthalate (MCOP) grouped by molecular weight of their parent compounds with body weight outcomes in children, adolescent and adult participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010.METHODSWe performed multinomial logistic regression to analyze the association between obesity and urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in children and adolescents and adults.RESULTSLow molecular weight (LMW) phthalate metabolites (MnBP, MEP and MiBP) are significantly (p<0.05) associated with higher odds for obesity in male children and adolescents. High molecular weight (HMW) phthalate metabolites (MECPP, MEHHP, MEOHP, MEHP, MBzP, MCNP, and MCOP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites (MEHHP, MEOHP, MEHP and MECPP) are significantly (p<0.05) associated with higher OR for obesity in all adults. Additionally, DEHP metabolites are significantly associated with obesity in all female adults; whereas DEHP and HMW metabolites are significantly associated with OR for obesity in males 60 years and older.CONCLUSIONSWe found age and sex differences in the association between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and body weight outcomes. Reverse causation cannot be excluded since overweight and obese people will have more fat mass, they may store more phthalates, thus leading to higher excretion concentrations.