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Arsenic (Inorganic)

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Journal Article
Journal Article

Silibinin potentially protects arsenic-induced oxidative hepatic dysfunction in rats

Authors: Muthumani, M; Prabu, SM (In Press) Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods. HERO ID: 1015878

[Less] Arsenic (As) compounds are reported as environmental toxicants and human carcinogens. Exposure to arsenic . . . [More] Arsenic (As) compounds are reported as environmental toxicants and human carcinogens. Exposure to arsenic imposes a big health issue worldwide. Silibinin (SB) is a major flavonolignan compound of silimarin and is found in milk thistle of Silybum marianum. It has been reported that silibinin has antioxidant efficacy as metal chelators due to the orientation of its functional groups. However, it has not yet been explored in experimental animals. In view of this fact, the purpose of this study was to delineate the ameliorative role of silibinin against arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were orally treated with arsenic alone (5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day) plus silibinin (75 mg/kg bw/day) for 4weeks. Hepatotoxicity was evaluated by the increased activities of serum hepatospecific enzymes namely aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase and total bilirubin along with increased elevation of lipid peroxidative markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl content and conjugated dienes. The toxic effect of arsenic was also indicated by significantly decreased activities of membrane bound ATPases, enzymatic antioxidants like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase along with nonenzymatic antioxidants like reduced glutathione, total sulfhydryl groups, vitamins C and E. Administration of silibinin exhibited a significant reversal of arsenic-induced toxicity in hepatic tissue. All these changes were supported by reduction of DNA damage in hepatocytes and histopathological observations of the liver. These results suggest that silibinin has a potential protective effect over arsenic-induced hepatotoxicity in rat.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Ameliorative effect Trichosanthes dioica root against experimentally induced arsenic toxicity in male albino rats

Authors: Bhattacharya, S; Haldar, PK (In Press) Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology. HERO ID: 1015695

[Less] The present study evaluated the ameliorative potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Trichosanthes dioica . . . [More] The present study evaluated the ameliorative potential of hydroalcoholic extract of Trichosanthes dioica root (TDA) against arsenic induced toxicity in male albino rats. TDA (5 and 10mg/kg) was administered orally to rats for 20 consecutive days before oral administration of sodium arsenite (10mg/kg) for 8 days. Then the body weights, organ weights, haematological profiles, serum biochemical profile; hepatic and renal antioxidative parameters viz. lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and DNA fragmentation were evaluated. Pretreatment with TDA markedly and significantly normalized body weights, organ weights, haematological profiles, serum biochemical profile and significantly modulated all the hepatic and renal biochemical parameters and reduced DNA fragmentation in arsenic intoxicated rats. The present findings conclude that T. dioica root possessed remarkable ameliorative effect against arsenic induced organ toxicity in male albino rats mediated by alleviation of arsenic induced oxidative stress by multiple mechanisms.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Structure-function alteration of hemoglobin in arsenicosis patients: A probable pathway to exert toxicity

Authors: Mondal, B; Chatterjee, D; Bhattacharyya, M (In Press) Journal of Applied Toxicology. HERO ID: 711038

[Less] Chronic arsenicosis, a major public health concern in India and Bangladesh, is mainly caused by ingestion . . . [More] Chronic arsenicosis, a major public health concern in India and Bangladesh, is mainly caused by ingestion of arsenic (As) contaminated ground water. Although this problem has been studied extensively, the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown. This paper investigates the process of trivalent arsenicals binding to hemoglobin (Hb) in chronic arsenicosis patients and consequent modification in the structure-function activity of Hb. In this work peroxidase activity, thermal denaturation profile, oxygen releasing capacity and hydrodynamic diameter have been evaluated for the Hb collected from subjects suffering with chronic arsenicosis. Increased peroxidative activity suggests altered oxidative status of Hb in the diseased state. The thermal denaturation profile indicates the Hb molecule to be more susceptible to unfolding in the pathologic state. The enhanced oxygen releasing capacity and significant reduction in hydrodynamic diameter of Hb is also observed in the diseased condition, suggesting conformational alterations in the Hb molecule. Finally, trivalent arsenic is found to bind with freshly isolated Hb from arsenicosis patients, binding affinity constant being 0.256 μM(-1) . The binding is positively cooperative with a Hill coefficient of +2.961 and isosbestic points at specific wavelengths. Thus, our work explores the structure-function property of Hb in chronic arsenicosis subjects and reveals that the molecule is modified in such a way that comparatively weak binding with oxygen and strong binding with arsenic occur simultaneously. This association may play a crucial role in exerting the pathway for arsenic toxicity. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Arsenic induced progesterone production in a caspase-3 dependent manner and changed redox status in preovulatory granulosa cells

Authors: Yuan, XH; Lu, CL; Yao, N; An, LS; Yang, BQ; Zhang, CL; Ma, X (In Press) Journal of Cellular Physiology. HERO ID: 710825

[Less] Arsenic contamination is a principal environmental health threat throughout the world. However, little . . . [More] Arsenic contamination is a principal environmental health threat throughout the world. However, little is known about the effect of arsenic on steroidogenesis in granulosa cells (GCs). We found that the treatment of preovulatory GCs with arsenite stimulated progesterone production. A significant increase in serum level of progesterone was observed in female Sprague-Dawley rats following arsenite treatment at a dose of 10 mg/L/rat/day for 7 days. Further experiments demonstrated that arsenite treatment did not change the level of intracellular cAMP or phosphorylated ERK1/2 in preovulatory GCs; however, progesterone production was significantly decreased when cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) or ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. This implied that the effect of arsenite on progesterone production may require cAMP/PKA and ERK1/2 signaling but not depend on them. Furthermore, we found that arsenite decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) but increased the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in parallel to the changes in progesterone production. Progesterone antagonist blocked the arsenic-stimulated increase of GSH levels. Arsenite treatment induced caspase-3 activation, although no apoptosis was observed. Inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly decreased progesterone production stimulated by arsenite or follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). GSH depletion with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) led to cell apoptosis in response to arsenite treatment. Collectively, this study demonstrated for the first time that arsenite stimulates progesterone production through cleaved/active caspase-3 dependent pathway, and the increase of GSH level promoted by progesterone production may protect GCs against apoptosis and maintain the steroidogenesis of GCs in response to arsenite treatment. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Oxidative modifications of proteins by sodium arsenite in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

Authors: Lii, C-K; Lin, A-H; Lee, S-L; Chen, H-W; Wang, T-S (In Press) Environmental Toxicology. HERO ID: 711001

[Less] Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that chronic arsenic exposure is associated with the incidence . . . [More] Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that chronic arsenic exposure is associated with the incidence of chronic diseases. This association is partly related to the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) overload and protein oxidation that result from arsenic exposure. In this study, we intended to identify proteins susceptible to oxidative carbonylation by sodium arsenite and the impact of carbonylation on the function of these proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) dot-blot assay revealed that arsenite (0-50 muM) dose-dependently increased protein carbonylation. Consistent with these findings, the cellular ROS level as measured by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCHF-DA) assay was increased in cells exposed to arsenite. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assist laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS), one glycolytic enzyme, enolase-alpha, two cytoskeleton proteins, fascin (F-actin associated protein) and vimentin, and two protein quality control proteins, HSC70 (heat-shock cognate protein 70), and PDIA3 (protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 3) were identified to be arsenic-sensitive carbonlyated proteins. Accompanied by carbonylation, enolase-alpha activity was dose-dependently decreased and the F-actin filament network was disturbed. Taken together, our results suggest that arsenite exposure results in the generation of carbonylated proteins, and the resultant changes in energy metabolism and in the cytoskeletal network may partly lead to cell damage.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of arsenic on modification of promyelocytic leukemia (PML): PML responds to low levels of arsenite

Authors: Hirano, S; Watanabe, T; Kobayashi, Y (In Press) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. HERO ID: 2088511

[Less] Inorganic arsenite (iAs(3+)) is a two-edged sword. iAs(3+) is a well-known human carcinogen; nevertheless, . . . [More] Inorganic arsenite (iAs(3+)) is a two-edged sword. iAs(3+) is a well-known human carcinogen; nevertheless, it has been used as a therapeutic drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), which is caused by a fusion protein comprising retinoic acid receptor-α and promyelocytic leukemia (PML). PML, a nuclear transcription factor, has a RING finger domain with densely positioned cysteine residues. To examine PML-modulated cellular responses to iAs(3+), CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells were each used to establish cell lines that expressed ectopic human PML. Overexpression of PML increased susceptibility to iAs(3+) in CHO-K1 cells, but not in HEK293 cells. Exposure of PML-transfected cells to iAs(3+) caused PML to change from a soluble form to less soluble forms, and this modification of PML was observable even with just 0.1μM iAs(3+) (7.5ppb). Western blot and immunofluorescent microscopic analyses revealed that the biochemical changes of PML were caused at least in part by conjugation with small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOylation). A luciferase reporter gene was used to investigate whether modification of PML was caused by oxidative stress or activation of antioxidant response element (ARE) in CHO-K1 cells. Modification of PML protein occurred faster than activation of the ARE in response to iAs(3+), suggesting that PML was not modified as a consequence of oxidative stress-induced ARE activation.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Arsenic-induced cutaneous hyperplastic lesions are associated with the dysregulation of Yap, a Hippo signaling-related protein

Authors: Li, C; Srivastava, RK; Elmets, CA; Afaq, F; Athar, M (In Press) Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. HERO ID: 1936067

[Less] Arsenic exposure in humans causes a number of toxic manifestations in the skin including cutaneous neoplasm. . . . [More] Arsenic exposure in humans causes a number of toxic manifestations in the skin including cutaneous neoplasm. However, the mechanism of these alterations remains elusive. Here, we provide novel observations that arsenic induced Hippo signaling pathway in the murine skin. This pathway plays crucial roles in determining organ size during the embryonic development and if aberrantly activated in adults, contributes to the pathogenesis of epithelial neoplasm. Arsenic treatment enhanced phosphorylation-dependent activation of LATS1 kinase and other Hippo signaling regulatory proteins Sav1 and MOB1. Phospho-LATS kinase is known to catalyze the inactivation of a transcriptional co-activator, Yap. However, in arsenic-treated epidermis, we did not observed its inactivation. Thus, as expected, unphosphorylated-Yap was translocated to the nucleus in arsenic-treated epidermis. Yap by binding to the transcription factors TEADs induces transcription of its target genes. Consistently, an up-regulation of Yap-dependent target genes Cyr61, Gli2, Ankrd1 and Ctgf was observed in the skin of arsenic-treated mice. Phosphorylated Yap is important in regulating tight and adherens junctions through its binding to αCatenin. We found disruption of these junctions in the arsenic-treated mouse skin despite an increase in αCatenin. These data provide evidence that arsenic-induced canonical Hippo signaling pathway and Yap-mediated disruption of tight and adherens junctions are independently regulated. These effects together may contribute to the carcinogenic effects of arsenic in the skin.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

JNK dependent Stat3 phosphorylation contributes to Akt activation in response to arsenic exposure

Authors: Liu, J; Chen, B; Lu, Y; Guan, Y; Chen, F (In Press) Toxicological Sciences. HERO ID: 1244046

[Less] Environmental exposure to arsenic, especially the trivalent inorganic form (As3+), has been linked to . . . [More] Environmental exposure to arsenic, especially the trivalent inorganic form (As3+), has been linked to human cancers in addition to a number of other diseases including skin lesions, cardiovascular disorders, neuropathy, and internal organ injury. In the present study, we describe a novel signaling axis of the c-Jun NH2 kinase (JNK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and its involvement in As3+-induced Akt activation in human bronchial epithelial cells. As3+ activates JNK and induces phoshporylation of the Stat3 at serine 727 (S727) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which occurred concomitantly with Akt activation. Disruption of the JNK signaling pathway by treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125, siRNA knockdown of JNK, or genetic deficiency of the JNK1 or JNK2 gene abrogated As3+-induced S727 phosphorylation of Stat3, Akt activation, and the consequent release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and migration of the cells. Similarly, pretreatment of the cells with Stat3 inhibitor or Stat3 siRNA prevented Akt activation and VEGF release from the cells in response to As3+ treatment. Taken together, these data revealed a new signaling mechanism that might be pivotal in As3+-induced malignant transformation of the cells by linking the key stress signaling pathway, JNK, to the activation of Stat3 and the carcinogenic kinase, Akt.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Curcumin encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles: A novel strategy for the treatment of arsenic toxicity

Authors: Yadav, A; Lomash, V; Samim, M; Flora, SJS (In Press) Chemico-Biological Interactions. HERO ID: 1248979

[Less] Water-soluble nanoparticles of curcumin were synthesized, characterized and applied as a stable detoxifying . . . [More] Water-soluble nanoparticles of curcumin were synthesized, characterized and applied as a stable detoxifying agent for arsenic poisoning. Chitosan nanoparticles of less than 50nm in diameter containing curcumin were prepared. The particles were characterized by TEM, DLS and FT-IR. The therapeutic efficacy of the encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (ECNPs) against arsenic-induced toxicity in rats was investigated. Sodium arsenite (2mg/kg) and ECNPs (1.5 or 15mg/kg) were orally administered to male Wistar rats for 4weeks to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ECNPs in blood and soft tissues. Arsenic significantly decreased blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased blood reactive oxygen species (ROS). These changes were accompanied by increases in hepatic total ROS, oxidized glutathione, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels. By contrast, hepatic GSH, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities significantly decreased on arsenic exposure, indicative of oxidative stress. Brain biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine) levels also showed significant changes on arsenic exposure. Co-administration of ECNPs provided pronounced beneficial effects on the adverse changes in oxidative stress parameters induced by arsenic. The results indicate that ECNPs have better antioxidant and chelating potential (even at the lower dose of 1.5mg/kg) compared to free curcumin at 15mg/kg. The significant neurochemical and immunohistochemical protection afforded by ECNPs indicates their neuroprotective efficacy. The formulation provides a novel therapeutic regime for preventing arsenic toxicity.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Arsenate accumulation and arsenate-induced glutathione export in astrocyte-rich primary cultures

Authors: Meyer, N; Koehler, Y; Tulpule, K; Dringen, R (In Press) Neurochemistry International. HERO ID: 1519021

[Less] Arsenate is a toxic compound that has been connected with neuropathies and impaired cognitive functions. . . . [More] Arsenate is a toxic compound that has been connected with neuropathies and impaired cognitive functions. To test whether arsenate affects the viability and the GSH metabolism of brain astrocytes, we have used primary astrocyte cultures as model system. Incubation of astrocytes for 2 h with arsenate in concentrations of up to 10 mM caused an almost linear increase in the cellular arsenic content, but did not acutely compromise cell viability. The presence of moderate concentrations of arsenate caused a time- and concentration-dependent loss of GSH from viable astrocytes which was accompanied by a matching increase in the extracellular GSH content. Half-maximal effects were observed for arsenate in a concentration of about 0.3 mM. The arsenate-induced stimulated GSH export from astrocytes was prevented by MK571, an inhibitor of the multidrug resistance protein 1. Exposure of astrocytes to arsenite increased the specific cellular arsenic content and stimulated GSH export to values that were similar to those observed for arsenate-treated cells, while dimethylarsinic acid was less efficiently accumulated by the cells and did not modulate cellular and extracellular GSH levels. The observed strong stimulation of GSH export from astrocytes by arsenate suggests that disturbances of the astrocytic GSH metabolism may contribute to the observed arsenic-induced neurotoxicity.