Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Arsenic (Inorganic)

Show Project Details Hide Project Details
411 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Health risk associated with dietary co-exposure to high levels of antimony and arsenic in the world's largest antimony mine area

Authors: Wu, F; Fu, Z; Liu, B; Mo, C; Chen, B; Corns, W; Liao, H (In Press) Science of the Total Environment. HERO ID: 737608

[Less] Like arsenic (As), antimony (Sb) is known to be a genotoxic element in vitro and in vivo. Sb is now . . . [More] Like arsenic (As), antimony (Sb) is known to be a genotoxic element in vitro and in vivo. Sb is now recognized as a global contaminant and has aroused the global concerns recently. However, knowledge is scarce concerning the transfer of Sb from the environment to humans and the related hazards to human health. In this pilot study, the health risk and main pathway of long-term human exposure to Sb and As for residents around Chinese Xikuangshan (XKS) Sb mine, the world's largest Sb mine, were evaluated by dietary exposure and hair accumulations survey. The concentrations and species of Sb and As in food samples (n=209) from three main categories and six subcategories, and in hair samples (n=89) were determined. Residents in the vicinity of XKS had an estimated dietary intake of Sb (554μg/day) which was 1.5 times higher than the tolerable daily intake (TDI) (Sb, 360μg/day), whereas their dietary intake of inorganic As (107μg/day) was slightly lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 15μg/kg BW/week (equal to 129μg As/day). Hair Sb and As concentrations (Sb, 15.7mg/kg, DW; As, 3.99mg/kg, DW) in XKS residents are both above the normal/toxic level. Rice, vegetables (especially leafy vegetable), drinking water, and meat/poultry were the dominant dietary intake sources of Sb for the residents. In contrast, rice was the uniquely dominant dietary intake source of As. Antimonate (Sb(V)) was the dominant Sb species in vegetables, drinking water and residents' hairs. This study highlighted the difference of exposure characteristics between Sb and As. The preliminary results suggested that dietary exposures to Sb, rather than As, was the dominant health risk to local residents. Nevertheless, the adverse effects of As levels on the health of residents still can not be ignored since the elevated As concentrations in human hair have reached the critical level for health risks. In addition, this pilot study did not consider the possible Sb and As combined effects.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Cancer and non-cancer health effects from food contaminant exposures for children and adults in California: A risk assessment

Authors: Vogt, R; Bennett, D; Cassady, D; Frost, J; Ritz, B; Hertz-Picciotto, I (In Press) Environmental Health. HERO ID: 1337520

[Less] ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the absence of current cumulative dietary exposure assessments, this analysis . . . [More] ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the absence of current cumulative dietary exposure assessments, this analysis was conducted to estimate exposure to multiple dietary contaminants for children, who are more vulnerable to toxic exposure than adults. METHODS: We estimated exposure to multiple food contaminants based on dietary data from preschool-age children (2--4 years, n=207), school-age children (5--7 years, n=157), parents of young children (n=446), and older adults (n=149). We compared exposure estimates for eleven toxic compounds (acrylamide, arsenic, lead, mercury, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, endosulfan, dieldrin, chlordane, DDE, and dioxin) based on self-reported food frequency data by age group. To determine if cancer and non-cancer benchmark levels were exceeded, chemical levels in food were derived from publicly available databases including the Total Diet Study. RESULTS: Cancer benchmark levels were exceeded by all children (100%) for arsenic, dieldrin, DDE, and dioxins. Non-cancer benchmarks were exceeded by >95% of preschool-age children for acrylamide and by 10% of preschool-age children for mercury. Preschool-age children had significantly higher estimated intakes of 6 of 11 compounds compared to school-age children (p<0.0001 to p=0.02). Based on self-reported dietary data, the greatest exposure to pesticides from foods included in this analysis were tomatoes, peaches, apples, peppers, grapes, lettuce, broccoli, strawberries, spinach, dairy, pears, green beans, and celery. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary strategies to reduce exposure to toxic compounds for which cancer and non-cancer benchmarks are exceeded by children vary by compound. These strategies include consuming organically produced dairy and selected fruits and vegetables to reduce pesticide intake, consuming less animal foods (meat, dairy, and fish) to reduce intake of persistent organic pollutants and metals, and consuming lower quantities of chips, cereal, crackers, and other processed carbohydrate foods to reduce acrylamide intake.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

SLCO1B1 variants and urine arsenic metabolites in the strong heart family study

Authors: Gribble, MO; Voruganti, VS; Cropp, CD; Francesconi, KA; Goessler, W; Umans, JG; Silbergeld, EK; Laston, SL; Haack, K; Kao, WHL; Fallin, MD; MacCluer, JW; Cole, SA; Navas-Acien, A (In Press) Toxicological Sciences. HERO ID: 1936044

[Less] Arsenic species patterns in urine are associated with risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The . . . [More] Arsenic species patterns in urine are associated with risk for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The organic anion transporter gene SLCO1B1 may transport arsenic species, but its association with arsenic metabolites in human urine has not yet been studied.Objective. To evaluate associations of urine arsenic metabolites with variants in the candidate gene SLCO1B1 in adults from the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS).Methods. We estimated associations between % arsenic species biomarker traits and 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SLCO1B1 gene in 157 participants, assuming additive genetics. Linear regression models for each SNP accounted for kinships and were adjusted for sex, body mass index and study center.Results. The minor allele of rs1564370 was associated with lower %MMA (p = 0.0003) and higher %DMA (p = 0.0002), accounting for 8% of the variance for %MMA and 9% for %DMA. The rs1564370 minor allele homozygote frequency was 17% and the heterozygote frequency was 43%. The minor allele of rs2291075 was associated with lower %MMA (p = 0.0006) and higher %DMA (p = 0.0014), accounting for 7% of the variance for %MMA and 5% for %DMA. The frequency of rs2291075 minor allele homozygotes was 1% and of heterozygotes it was 15%.Conclusions. Common variants in SLCO1B1 were associated with differences in arsenic metabolites in a preliminary candidate gene study. Replication of this finding in other populations and analyses with respect to disease outcomes are needed to determine whether this novel candidate gene is important for arsenic-associated disease risks.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

GSTO and AS3MT genetic polymorphisms and differences in urinary arsenic concentrations among residents in Bangladesh

Authors: Rodrigues, EG; Kile, M; Hoffman, E; Quamruzzaman, Q; Rahman, M; Mahiuddin, G; Hsueh, Y; Christiani, DC (In Press) Biomarkers. HERO ID: 1015752

[Less] We determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the glutathione S-transferase omega . . . [More] We determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the glutathione S-transferase omega (GSTO) and arsenic(III)methyltransferase (AS3MT) genes were associated with concentrations of urinary arsenic metabolites among 900 individuals without skin lesions in Bangladesh. Four SNPs were assessed in these genes. A pathway analysis evaluated the association between urinary arsenic metabolites and SNPs. GSTO1 rs4925 homozygous wild type was significantly associated with higher monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid urinary concentrations, whereas wild-type AS3MT rs11191439 had significantly lower levels of As(III) and MMA. Genetic polymorphisms GSTO and As3MT modify arsenic metabolism as evidenced by altered urinary arsenic excretion.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

N-6-Adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) polymorphisms and arsenic methylation in Andean women

Authors: Harari, F; Engström, K; Concha, G; Colque, G; Vahter, M; Broberg, K (In Press) Environmental Health Perspectives. HERO ID: 1597348

[Less] Background: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic . . . [More] Background: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT polymorphisms are associated with arsenic metabolism efficiency. Recently, a putative N-6-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) was found to methylate arsenic in vitro. Objective: We evaluated the role of N6AMT1 polymorphisms in arsenic methylation efficiency in humans. Methods: We assessed arsenic methylation efficiency in 188 women exposed to arsenic via drinking water (~ 200 µg/L) in the Argentinean Andes by measuring the relative concentrations of arsenic metabolites in urine [inorganic arsenic, methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid] by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We performed genotyping for N6AMT1 and AS3MT polymorphisms by Taqman assays, and gene expression (in blood; n = 63) with Illumina HumanHT-12 v4.0. Results: Five N6AMT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1997605, rs2205449, rs2705671, rs16983411, and rs1048546) and two N6AMT1 haplotypes were significantly associated with the percentage of MMA (%MMA) in urine, even after adjusting for AS3MT haplotype. %MMA increased monotonically according to the number of alleles for each SNP (e.g., for rs1048546, mean %MMA was 7.5% for GG, 8.8% for GT, and 9.7% for TT carriers). Three SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium (R2 > 0.8). Estimated associations for joint effects of N6AMT1 (haplotype 1) and AS3MT (haplotype 2) were generally consistent with expectations for additive effects of each haplotype on %MMA. Carriers of N6AMT1 genotypes associated with lower %MMA showed the lowest N6AMT1 expression, but associations were monotonic according to copy number for only one genotype and one haplotype. Conclusions: N6AMT1 polymorphisms were associated with arsenic methylation in Andean women, independent of AS3MT. N6AMT1 polymorphisms may be susceptibility markers for arsenic-related toxic effects.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Inorganic and Total Arsenic Contents in Rice-Based Foods for Children with Celiac Disease

Authors: Munera-Picazo, S; Ramírez-Gandolfo, A; Burló, F; Carbonell-Barrachina, AA (2014) Journal of Food Science 79:T122-T128. HERO ID: 2215746

[Less] Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the villi of the small intestine causing abdominal . . . [More] Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the villi of the small intestine causing abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, or bad absorption due to gluten intolerance. The only treatment for this disease consists of a lifelong gluten free diet; this is, celiac people cannot consume products containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye, but they can use rice and corn. Thus, rice flour is mainly used for the manufacturing of the basic products of this population. Unfortunately, rice can contain high contents of total (t-As) and inorganic (i-As) arsenic. The current study demonstrated that products for celiac children with a high percentage of rice contained high concentrations of arsenic (256 and 128 μg kg(-1) ). The daily intake of i-As ranged from 0.61 to 0.78 μg kg(-1) body weight (bw) in children up to 5 y of age; these values were below the maximum value established by the EFSA Panel (8.0 μg kg(-1) bw per day), but it should be considered typical of populations with a high exposure to this pollutant. Finally, legislation is needed to improve the labeling of these special rice-based foods for celiac children; label should include information about percentage, geographical origin, and cultivar of the used rice.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Ethnic characterization of a population of children exposed to high doses of arsenic via drinking water and a possible correlation with metabolic processes

Authors: Bobillo, C; Navoni, JA; Olmos, V; Merini, LJ; Villaamil Lepori, E; Corach, D (2014) International Journal of Molecular Epidemiology and Genetics 5:1-10. HERO ID: 2278047

[Less] Because the ratio between the two major arsenic metabolites is related to the adverse health effects . . . [More] Because the ratio between the two major arsenic metabolites is related to the adverse health effects of arsenic, numerous studies have been performed to establish a relationship between the ability to metabolically detoxify arsenic and other variables, including exposure level, gender, age and ethnicity. Because ethnicity may play a key role and provide relevant information for heterogeneous populations, we characterized a group of 70 children from rural schools in the Argentinean provinces of Chaco and Santiago del Estero who were exposed to high levels of arsenic. We used genetic markers for maternal, paternal and bi-parental ancestry to achieve this goal. Our results demonstrate that the Amerindian maternal linages are present in 100% of the samples, whereas the Amerindian component transmitted through the paternal line is less than 10%. Informative markers for autosomal ancestry show a predominantly European ancestry, in which 37% of the samples contained between 90 and 99% European ancestry. The native American component ranged from 50 to 80% in 15.7% of the samples, and in all but four samples, the African component was less than 10%. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the ethnicity and the ratio of the excreted arsenic metabolites monomethyl arsenic and dimethyl arsenic are not associated, dismissing a relationship between ethnic origin and differential metabolism.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Role of folic acid on symptoms of chronic arsenic toxicity

Authors: Ghose, N; Majumdar, KK; Ghose, AK; Saha, CK; Nandy, AK; Mazumder, DNG (2014) International Journal of Preventive Medicine 5:89-98. HERO ID: 2279450

[Less] BACKGROUND: Chronic arsenic toxicity (Arsenicosis) due to drinking of arsenic contaminated . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Chronic arsenic toxicity (Arsenicosis) due to drinking of arsenic contaminated ground water is a global problem. However, its treatment is unsatisfactory. Methylation of arsenic facilitates its urinary excretion. Persons with relatively lower proportion of urinary dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA) are found to have at greater risk of developing symptoms of arsenicosis including its complications. The biochemical pathway responsible for methylation of arsenic is a folate-dependent pathway. Studies in rodents and humans suggest that folate nutritional status influences the metabolism of arsenic.

METHODS: The present study compares the effect of giving folic acid on 32 arsenicosis patients during a 6-month period and comparing the results with clinical effect of taking only arsenic-free safe water on 45 age and sex-matched arsenic-affected people for the same period.

RESULTS: There was significant improvement of arsenical skin lesion score of both patients treated with folic acid (2.96 ± 1.46 to 1.90 ± 0.90, P < 0.001) and arsenic free safe water (2.91 ± 1.26 to 1.62 ± 1.05, P < 0.001) for a period of 6 months. Significant improvement in systemic disease score was also observed from the baseline systemic score in folic acid treated group (4.78 ± 3.43 to 1.00 ± 1.56, P < 0.001) and the group treated with arsenic-free water (1.87 ± 2.11 to 0.82 ± 1.62, P < 0.001). However, there was a significant increased improvement of systematic disease score in the folic acid treated group compared to the control group taking arsenic free water (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that folic acid treatment in arsenicosis cases could help in reducing clinical symptoms of arsenicosis.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Evaluation of seasonal dietary exposure to arsenic, cadmium and lead in schoolchildren through the analysis of meals served by public schools of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil

Authors: Nacano, LR; de Freitas, R; Barbosa, F, Jr (2014) Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues 77:367-374. HERO ID: 2278040

[Less] Dietary exposure to arsenic (AS), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) of Brazilian schoolchildren living in . . . [More] Dietary exposure to arsenic (AS), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) of Brazilian schoolchildren living in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, was assessed. Food samples including rice, beans, vegetables, fruits, and meat served daily by public schools were collected as presented in different seasons. Metallic elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).The main sources of As, Cd, and Pb were found to be rice, vegetables, and pork, respectively. Further, in some food types there were seasonal differences in the concentrations of metallic elements. The mean daily intakes of As, Cd, and Pb based upon the association between food consumption data and the observed concentrations of metals in their diet were 6.9 μg, 0.9 μg, and 0.6 μg for As, Cd, and Pb, respectively. These findings are below the toxicological reference values provided by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Maternal-child transfer of essential and toxic elements through breast milk in a mine-waste polluted area

Authors: Castro, F; Harari, F; Llanos, M; Vahter, M; Ronco, AM (2014) American Journal of Perinatology 31:993-1002. HERO ID: 2298674

[Less] Objective: To determine the daily intake of essential micronutrients and toxic elements through breast . . . [More] Objective: To determine the daily intake of essential micronutrients and toxic elements through breast milk in exclusive and nonexclusive breastfed infants living in an area with major mine tailing deposition (n = 24), compared with a control area (n = 11).

Study Design: The milk volume ingested by 2 to 4 and 4 to 6 month infants was measured by a stable isotopic method. Elements in milk, maternal and infant urine, and drinking water were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

Results: Similar breast milk volume and essential micronutrients intake in groups of exclusively breastfed infants, but more cadmium, boron, and lithium through breastfeeding in experimental area was found. This exposure was even higher in the nonexclusively breastfed infants, who also ingested more arsenic, boron, and lithium than exclusive breastfed infants.

Conclusion: The use of the deuterium and the ICP-MS methods made it possible to evaluate the exact amount of essential and toxic elements ingested by infants through breast milk demonstrating that lower amount of toxic elements are transferred to exclusive breastfed infants compared with those who additionally received nonmaternal milk.