Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


ISA-PM (current)


2,655 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A cross-disciplinary evaluation of evidence for multipollutant effects on cardiovascular disease

Authors: Luben, TJ; Buckley, BJ; Patel, MM; Stevens, T; Coffman, E; Rappazzo, KM; Owens, EO; Hines, EP; Moore, D; Painter, K; Jones, R; Datko-Williams, L; Wilkie, AA; Madden, M; Richmond-Bryant, J (2018) Environmental Research 161:144-152. [Review] HERO ID: 4140291

[Less] BACKGROUND: The current single-pollutant approach to regulating ambient air pollutants . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The current single-pollutant approach to regulating ambient air pollutants is effective at protecting public health, but efficiencies may be gained by addressing issues in a multipollutant context since multiple pollutants often have common sources and individuals are exposed to more than one pollutant at a time.

OBJECTIVE: We performed a cross-disciplinary review of the effects of multipollutant exposures on cardiovascular effects.

METHODS: A broad literature search for references including at least two criteria air pollutants (particulate matter [PM], ozone [O3], oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide) was conducted. References were culled based on scientific discipline then searched for terms related to cardiovascular disease. Most multipollutant epidemiologic and experimental (i.e., controlled human exposure, animal toxicology) studies examined PM and O3 together.

DISCUSSION: Epidemiologic and experimental studies provide some evidence for O3 concentration modifying the effect of PM, although PM did not modify O3 risk estimates. Experimental studies of combined exposure to PM and O3 provided evidence for additivity, synergism, and/or antagonism depending on the specific health endpoint. Evidence for other pollutant pairs was more limited.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the evidence for multipollutant effects was often heterogeneous, and the limited number of studies inhibited making a conclusion about the nature of the relationship between pollutant combinations and cardiovascular disease.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Effects of air pollution exposure on glucose metabolism in Los Angeles minority children

Authors: Toledo-Corral, CM; Alderete, TL; Habre, R; Berhane, K; Lurmann, FW; Weigensberg, MJ; Goran, MI; Gilliland, FD (2018) Pediatric Obesity. HERO ID: 3455482

[Less] OBJECTIVES: Growing evidence indicates that ambient (AAP: NO2 , PM2.5 and O3 ) and . . . [More] OBJECTIVES: Growing evidence indicates that ambient (AAP: NO2 , PM2.5 and O3 ) and traffic-related air pollutants (TRAP) contribute to metabolic disease risk in adults; however, few studies have examined these relationships in children.

METHODS: Metabolic profiling was performed in 429 overweight and obese African-American and Latino youth living in urban Los Angeles, California. This cross-sectional study estimated individual residential air pollution exposure and used linear regression to examine relationships between air pollution and metabolic outcomes.

RESULTS: AAP and TRAP exposure were associated with adverse effects on glucose metabolism independent of body fat percent. PM2.5 was associated with 25.0% higher fasting insulin (p < 0.001), 8.3% lower insulin sensitivity (p < 0.001), 14.7% higher acute insulin response to glucose (p = 0.001) and 1.7% higher fasting glucose (p < 0.001). Similar associations were observed for increased NO2 exposure. TRAP from non-freeway roads was associated with 12.1% higher insulin (p < 0.001), 6.9% lower insulin sensitivity (p = 0.02), 10.8% higher acute insulin response to glucose (p = 0.003) and 0.7% higher fasting glucose (p = 0.047).

CONCLUSIONS: Elevated air pollution exposure was associated with a metabolic profile that is characteristic of increased risk for type 2 diabetes. These results indicate that increased prior year exposure to air pollution may adversely affect type 2 diabetes-related pathophysiology in overweight and obese minority children.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 6 (populations at risk) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4442367


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 9 (reproductive and developmental effects) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4442365


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 6 (cardiovascular effects) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4442361


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 5 (respiratory effects) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4566668


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 7 of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter – health criteria

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4434892


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 8 of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter – health criteria

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4414073


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 10 (cancer) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4417285


Technical Report
Technical Report

Supplemental material: Chapter 11 (mortality) of the integrated science assessment for particulate matter

Author: U.S. EPA (2018) HERO ID: 4442366