Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


PFHxA (307-24-4)


249 References Were Found:

Technical Report
Technical Report

Safety data sheet. Version 5.2. Undecafluorohexanoic acid. Product number 29226. CAS-No 307-24-4

Author: Sigma-Aldrich (2017) [Fact Sheet] HERO ID: 3980883


Technical Report
Technical Report

Environment tier II assessment for short-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids and their direct precursors. CAS registry numbers: 307-24-4, 21615-47-4, 2706-90-3, 68259-11-0, 375-22-4, 336-59-4

Author: NICNAS (2017) Australian Government Department of Health, National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme. HERO ID: 3860584


Technical Report
Technical Report

Human health tier II assessment for short chain perfluorocarboxylic acids and their direct precursors

Author: NICNAS (2017) Australian Government, Department of Health, National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme. HERO ID: 3860585


Technical Report
Technical Report

Case study from SEURAT-1: Perfluoroalkyl acids: direct acting toxicant category supported by SEURAT-1 data

Author: ECHA (2017) HERO ID: 3878517


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Atmospheric chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate and ionic perfluoroalkyl acids in 2006 to 2014 in Dalian, China

Authors: Liu, W; Qin, H; Li, J; Zhang, Q; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; He, X (2017) Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 36:2581-2586. HERO ID: 3856455

[Less] Chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate (Cl-PFESA; trade name F-53B) is an alternative product for . . . [More] Chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate (Cl-PFESA; trade name F-53B) is an alternative product for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) used in metal plating; little is known about its levels in the environment and its risks. To our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first report of Cl-PFESA in the atmosphere. In 2006 to 2014, C8 Cl-PFESA, along with ionic perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), was detected in atmospheric particulate matter in Dalian, China. Concentrations of C8 Cl-PFESA increased from 140 pg/m(3) in 2007 to 722 pg/m(3) in 2014. Levels of 11 (total) ionic PFAAs increased in 2006 to 2008 and decreased afterward, with a range of 35.7 to 860 pg/m(3) . The PFAAs in the particulate matter were dominated by perfluorocarboxylates, with perfluorooctanoate detected at the highest concentration at a mean level of 71.7 pg/m(3) , followed by perfluoroheptanoate and perfluorohexanoate. Perfluorosulfonates were detected at lower levels, with mean concentrations of PFOS, perfluorobutanesulfonate, and perfluorohexane sulfonate of 5.73, 1.64, and 1.24 pg/m(3) , respectively. Back-trajectory analysis suggested that the air mass approaching Dalian during the sampling originated from the northwest, where fluorochemical industry parks and metal plating industries are densely located. No significant correlation was observed between Cl-PFESA and the ionic PFAAs. The relatively high Cl-PFESA concentrations suggested that it possibly contributed largely to the previously reported exposure to undefined organic fluorine compounds, for which further research on emission and environmental risks is needed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-6. © 2017 SETAC.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The use of carbon adsorbents for the removal of perfluoroalkyl acids from potable reuse systems

Authors: Inyang, M; Dickenson, ERV (2017) Chemosphere 184:168-175. HERO ID: 3858250

[Less] Bench- and pilot-scale sorption tests were used to probe the performance of several biochars at removing . . . [More] Bench- and pilot-scale sorption tests were used to probe the performance of several biochars at removing perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) from field waters, compared to granular activated carbon (GAC). Screening tests using organic matter-free water resulted in hardwood (HWC) (Kd = 41 L g(-1)) and pinewood (PWC) (Kd = 49 L g(-1)) biochars having the highest perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) removal performance that was comparable to bituminous coal GAC (Kd = 41 L g(-1)). PWC and HWC had a stronger affinity for PFOA sorbed in Lake Mead surface water (KF = 11 mg((1-n)) L(n) g(-1)) containing a lower (2 mg L(-1)) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration than in a tertiary-filtered wastewater (KF = 8 mg((1-n)) L(n) g(-1)) with DOC of 4.9 mg L(-1). A pilot-scale study was performed using three parallel adsorbers (GAC, anthracite, and HWC biochar) treating the same tertiary-filtered wastewater. Compared to HWC, and anthracite, GAC was the most effective in mitigating perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPnA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PHxA), PFOA, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and DOC (45-67% removed at 4354 bed volumes) followed by HWC, and then anthracite. Based on bench- and pilot-scale results, shorter-chain PFAA [perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), PFPnA, or PFHxA] were more difficult to remove with both biochar and GAC than the longer-chain, PFOS and PFOA.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in San Francisco Bay wildlife: Temporal trends, exposure pathways, and notable presence of precursor compounds

Authors: Sedlak, MD; Benskin, JP; Wong, A; Grace, R; Greig, DJ (2017) Chemosphere 185:1217-1226. HERO ID: 3859702

[Less] Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in San Francisco Bay (SF Bay) wildlife have historically . . . [More] Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in San Francisco Bay (SF Bay) wildlife have historically been among the highest reported globally. To track continuing exposures to PFASs and assess the impact of the 2002 phase-out of production of PFOS and related chemicals in the US, nine perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs; C4-C12), three perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs; C4, C6, C8) and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA, a PFOS precursor) were measured in SF Bay cormorant eggs in 2012 and harbor seal serum sampled between 2009 and 2014. PFOS remained the dominant perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) in both cormorant eggs (36.1-466 ng/g) and seals (12.6-796 ng/g) from 2012 and 2014, respectively. Concentrations in seal and bird eggs from the South Bay have declined approximately 70% in both matrices. To elucidate potential pathways of exposure, prey fish, sediments and wastewater effluent were analyzed for PFASs, and in the case of sediment and effluent, a suite of PFAA precursors. PFOS was the dominant PFAA in prey fish and sediment. In effluent, different mixtures of PFAAs were measured, with PFOS, PFHxA, and PFOA detected in the highest concentrations. Polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (PFCA-precursors) were observed at concentrations over an order of magnitude higher than PFCAs in sediment, highlighting their importance as a potential, on-going source of PFCAs to SF Bay wildlife. These findings suggest that the PFOS phase-out has resulted in reduced burdens to wildlife in SF Bay, but that exposure to diverse and incompletely characterized PFASs continues.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Serum concentrations of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances and factors associated with exposure in the general adult population in South Korea

Authors: Lee, JH; Lee, CK; Suh, CH; Kang, HS; Hong, CP; Choi, SN (2017) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 220:1046-1054. HERO ID: 3858472

[Less] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous contaminants found worldwide, including in . . . [More] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous contaminants found worldwide, including in South Korea. As a result, they are frequently detected in Koreans. However, there is limited representative data and information on potential sources in Korea. Therefore, we measured the serum concentrations of ten PFASs in nationally representative samples of the Korean population (n=1874, 18-69 years) and evaluated the factors associated with their exposure. Serum PFOS, PFDA, PFOA, and PFNA were detected in nearly all participants (83.1-99.9%). However, serum PFPA, PFHxA, and PFHpA were almost undetected (<0.5% of participants). PFOS had the highest population-weighted geometric mean of 10.23ng/mL (95% CI: 9.99-10.47), which was followed by PFOA with 2.85ng/mL (95% CI: 2.73-2.97) and PFDA with 2.17ng/mL (95% CI: 2.12-2.23). PFNA, PFDA, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOS concentrations were higher in males (p<0.001) and older adults (p<0.001). PFNA was higher in those who used wax, polish, and water-resistant materials (adjusted proportional change=1.14; 95% CI: 1.08-1.22), and those who ate cooked fish (1.16; 95% CI: 1.03-1.31) compared to those who ate nearly no fish. PFDA was higher in those who used herbicides and pesticides (1.05; 95% CI: 1.02-1.09), those who drank beverages in a plastic bag on a daily basis (1.10; 95% CI: 1.03-1.19), and those who ate raw fish (1.15; 95% CI: 1.03-1.29) or cooked fish (1.13; 95% CI: 1.05-1.23) compared to those who ate nearly no fish. PFHxS was higher in those who used traditional Korean health supplement foods (1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.15). PFOA was higher in those who used plastic wrap in a microwave daily or weekly (1.08; 95% CI: 1.00-1.16), and those who used disposable paper cups (1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.13). PFOS was lower in underweight participants (0.84; 95%CI: 0.75-0.93) compared to those who were obese, and higher in those who exercised regularly (1.08; 95% CI: 1.03-1.14) or irregularly (1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.12) compared to those who did not exercise. Subjects who used severely damaged Teflon appliances had lower concentrations of PFOA (0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.95), while regular use of Gore-Tex goods was related to higher PFNA (1.15, 95% CI: 1.03-1.28) and PFDA (1.11; 95% CI: 1.02-1.20) levels. These findings suggest that most Koreans are frequently exposed to PFASs, and that serum concentrations of PFASs vary with age, sex, and exposure factors.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Serum perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and associations with behavioral attributes

Authors: Siebenaler, R; Cameron, R; Butt, CM; Hoffman, K; Higgins, CP; Stapleton, HM (2017) Chemosphere 184:687-693. HERO ID: 3858477

[Less] The ubiquitous use of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in a variety of industrial and consumer . . . [More] The ubiquitous use of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in a variety of industrial and consumer products has resulted in chronic exposure in most industrialized nations, and led to measurable concentrations in blood and other tissues in humans across all life stages; however, behavioral attributes that relate to exposure are not well studied. To further investigate how behavior may relate to PFAS exposure, 37 adults were recruited from central North Carolina. Participants provided blood samples and behavioral questionnaires were administered, asking questions about a variety of household, dietary, and behavioral outcomes. Six PFAAs, including PFHxA (geometric mean: 0.14 ng/mL), PFOA (1.57 ng/mL), PFNA (0.67 ng/mL), PFDA (0.28 ng/mL), PFHxS (3.17 ng/mL) and PFOS (4.96 ng/mL) were detected in >50% of the samples. Generally, males had higher serum levels than females across all chemicals, and levels were very similar to NHANES levels; however, PFHxS and PFDA levels were higher in our study population. Several personal characteristics and behaviors were associated with serum PFAS levels. Reported use of filtration devices was associated with lower levels of PFOA (28% lower, p = 0.03), but higher levels of PFHxA (122% higher, p = 0.04). Serum PFHxS levels were also elevated in individuals that vacuumed less often, and in individuals that reported consuming more microwavable foods. These results suggest that personal behaviors may be important determinants of PFAS exposures.

Data/Software
Data/ Software

Toxicokinetic evaluation (C20613) of perfluorohexanoic acid (307-24-4) in Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats exposed via gavage or intravenous injection

Author: NTP (2017) HERO ID: 3899973