Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


PFHxA (307-24-4)


20 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Plasma concentration of 14 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) among children from seven cities in Guangdong, China

Authors: Zhang, R; Ye, J; Wei, Q; Li, M; Xu, K; Li, Z; Lin, W; Liu, P; Chen, R; Ma, A; Zhou, Z (2018) Science of the Total Environment 616-617:1469-1476. HERO ID: 4238457

[Less] The toxicity and persistence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in humans have drawn growing concerns, . . . [More] The toxicity and persistence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in humans have drawn growing concerns, particularly for children. However, data regarding the concentrations of PFAAs in children are limited. In this study, we measured the concentrations of 14 PFAAs in plasma samples collected from 1192 children aged 0-7years from 7 cities in Guangdong Province: Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Foshan, Dongguan, Zhaoqing, Zhongshan and Zhanjiang. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were detected in >99.5% of the analysed samples. PFOS had the highest median concentration (23.6ng/mL) in the total samples, followed by PFOA (2.8ng/mL). The median concentrations of the other PFAAs were lower than 0.4ng/mL. The concentrations of perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluorononanoic acid, perfluorodecanoic acid, perfluorododecanoic acid, perfluorohexane sulfonate, PFOA and PFOS in children from Foshan were significantly higher than those found in other cities (p<0.001). Negative correlations between most of the PFAA concentrations and age (r=-0.06--0.45) were found in all children. Weak to moderate correlations (r=0.080-0.698) were observed between all PFAA concentrations. Our findings indicated a high exposure of children to PFAAs in the early life-stage. The exposure sources and pathways of PFAAs in different regions are different. Considering a lack of information on the exposure pathways and health status, more studies are needed to evaluate the exposure resources and assess the health risk of PFAA exposure in children.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Relationship between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity and cellular concentration of 14 perfluoroalkyl substances in HepG2 cells

Authors: Rosenmai, AK; Ahrens, L; le Godec, T; Lundqvist, J; Oskarsson, A (2018) Journal of Applied Toxicology 38:219-226. HERO ID: 4220319

[Less] Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a molecular target for perfluoroalkyl substances . . . [More] Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a molecular target for perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). Little is known about the cellular uptake of PFASs and how it affects the PPARα activity. We investigated the relationship between PPARα activity and cellular concentration in HepG2 cells of 14 PFASs, including perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), perfluoroalkyl sulfonates and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA). Cellular concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and PPARα activity was determined in transiently transfected cells by reporter gene assay. Cellular uptake of the PFASs was low (0.04-4.1%) with absolute cellular concentrations in the range 4-2500 ng mg-1 protein. Cellular concentration of PFCAs increased with perfluorocarbon chain length up to perfluorododecanoate. PPARα activity of PFCAs increased with chain length up to perfluorooctanoate. The maximum induction of PPARα activity was similar for short-chain (perfluorobutanoate and perfluoropentanoate) and long-chain PFCAs (perfluorododecanoate and perfluorotetradecanoate) (approximately twofold). However, PPARα activities were induced at lower cellular concentrations for the short-chain homologs compared to the long-chain homologs. Perfluorohexanoate, perfluoroheptanoate, perfluorooctanoate, perfluorononanoate (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoate induced PPARα activities >2.5-fold compared to controls. The concentration-response relationships were positive for all the tested compounds, except perfluorooctane sulfonate PFOS and FOSA, and were compound-specific, as demonstrated by differences in the estimated slopes. The relationships were steeper for PFCAs with chain lengths up to and including PFNA than for the other studied PFASs. To our knowledge, this is the first report establishing relationships between PPARα activity and cellular concentration of a broad range of PFASs.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Interactions of perfluoroalkyl substances with a phospholipid bilayer studied by neutron reflectometry

Authors: Nouhi, Y; Ahrens, L; Kabayama, HH; Hughes, NAV; Campana, M; Gutfreund, P; Palsson, GK; Vorobiev, AA; Hellsing, MS (2018) Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 511:474-481. HERO ID: 4234858

[Less] The interactions between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and a phospholipid bilayer (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) . . . [More] The interactions between perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and a phospholipid bilayer (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) were investigated at the molecular level using neutron reflectometry. Representative PFASs with different chain length and functional groups were selected in this study including: perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA). All PFASs were found to interact with the bilayer by incorporation, indicating PFAS ability to accumulate once ingested or taken up by organisms. The interactions were observed to increase with chain length and vary with the functional group as SO2NH2(FOSA)>SO2O-(PFOS)>COO-(PFNA). The PFAS hydrophobicity, which is strongly correlated with perfluorocarbon chain length, was found to strongly influence the interactions. Longer chain PFASs showed higher tendency to penetrate into the bilayer compared to the short-chain compounds. The incorporated PFASs could for all substances but one (PFNA) be removed from the lipid membrane by gentle rinsing with water (2mLmin-1). Although short-chain PFASs have been suggested to be the potentially less bioaccumulative alternative, we found that in high enough concentrations they can also disturb the bilayer. The roughness and disorder of the bilayer was observed to increase as the concentration of PFASs increased (in particular for the high concentrations of short-chain substances i.e. PFHxA and PFBS), which can be an indication of aggregation of PFASs in the bilayer.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Cellular accumulation and lipid binding of perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFASs) - A comparison with lysosomotropic drugs

Authors: Sanchez Garcia, D; Sjödin, M; Hellstrandh, M; Norinder, U; Nikiforova, V; Lindberg, J; Wincent, E; Bergman, Å; Cotgreave, I; Munic Kos, V (2018) Chemico-Biological Interactions 281:1-10. HERO ID: 4234856

[Less] Many chemicals accumulate in organisms through a variety of different mechanisms. Cationic amphiphilic . . . [More] Many chemicals accumulate in organisms through a variety of different mechanisms. Cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) accumulate in lysosomes and bind to membranes causing phospholipidosis, whereas many lipophilic chemicals target adipose tissue. Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are widely used as surfactants, but many of them are highly bioaccumulating and persistent in the environment, making them notorious environmental toxicants. Understanding the mechanisms of their bioaccumulation is, therefore, important for their regulation and substitution with new, less harmful chemicals. We compared the highly bioaccumulative perfluorooctanesulfonic acid PFOS to its three less bioaccumulative alternatives perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS), in their ability to accumulate and remain in lung epithelial cells (NCI-H292) and adipocytes (3T3-L1K) in vitro. As a reference point we tested a set of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs), known to highly accumulate in cells and strongly bind to phospholipids, together with their respective non-CAD controls. Finally, all compounds were examined for their ability to bind to neutral lipids and phospholipids in cell-free systems. Cellular accumulation and retention of the test compounds were highly correlated between the lung epithelial cells and adipocytes. Interestingly, although an anion itself, intensities of PFOS accumulation and retention in cells were comparable to those of CAD compounds, but PFOS failed to induce phospholipidosis or alter lysosomal volume. Compared to other lipophilicity measures, phospholipophilicity shows the highest correlation (Rˆ2 = 0.75) to cellular accumulation data in both cell types and best distinguishes between high and low accumulating compounds. This indicates that binding to phospholipids may be the most important component in driving high cellular accumulation in lung epithelial cells, as well as in adipocytes, and for both CADs and bioaccumulating PFASs. Obtained continuous PLS models based on compound's affinity for phospholipids and neutral lipids can be used as good prediction models of cellular accumulation and retention of PFASs and CADs.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Design of a Hybrid Nanofiltration/Electrooxidation Process for the Removal of Perfluorohexanoic Acid (PFHxA)

Authors: Soriano, A; Gorri, D; Urtiaga, Ane (2017) HERO ID: 4239325

[Less] The present work analyses a pilot scale hybrid nanofiltration/electrooxidation process for the removal . . . [More] The present work analyses a pilot scale hybrid nanofiltration/electrooxidation process for the removal of persistent perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) from industrial process waters. A mathematical model was developed enabling the simulation and scale-up of the independent nanofiltration (NF) and electrooxidation (ELOX) units. Commercial spiral wound membrane modules and recirculation strategies were implemented in the NF simulation. One single NF unit and a cascade of NF stages were compared. A battery of serial-parallel electrochemical cells was designed for the ELOX system. The simulations showed that the electrochemical treatment is, when one and two NF stages are used, the most energy demanding process. Adding more NF stages increased noticeably the contribution of NF to the global energy consumption. The NF preconcentration strategy was able to reduce significantly the ELOX energy consumption (up to 86 %) and the overall energy demand. The hybrid NF/ELOX process is foreseen as a beneficial strategy to reduce the energy consumption of large-scale electrochemical processes aimed at the treatment of waters polluted by persistent organic compounds.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Perfluoroalkyl acids in surface waters and tapwater in the Qiantang River watershed-Influences from paper, textile, and leather industries

Authors: Lu, GH; Gai, N; Zhang, P; Piao, HT; Chen, S; Wang, XC; Jiao, XC; Yin, XC; Tan, KY; Yang, YL (2017) Chemosphere 185:610-617. HERO ID: 3859699

[Less] Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used as multi-purpose surfactants or water/oil repellents. In . . . [More] Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used as multi-purpose surfactants or water/oil repellents. In order to understand the contamination level and compositional profiles of PFAAs in aqueous environment in textile, leather, and paper making industrial areas, surface waters and tap waters were collected along the watershed of the Qiantang River where China's largest textile, leather, and paper making industrial bases are located. For comparison, surface water and tapwater samples were also collected in Hangzhou and its adjacent areas. 17 PFAAs were analyzed by solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The results show that the total concentrations of PFAAs (ΣPFAAs) in the Qiantang River waters ranged from 106.1 to 322.9 ng/L, averaging 164.2 ng/L. The contamination levels have been found to be extremely high, comparable to the levels of the most serious PFAA contamination in surface waters of China. The PFAA composition profiles were characterized by the dominant PFOA (average 58.1% of the total PFAAs), and PFHxA (average 18.8%). The ΣPFAAs in tap water ranged from 9.5 to 174.8 ng/L, showing PFAA compositional pattern similar to the surface waters. Good correlations between PFAA composition profiles in tap waters and the surface waters were observed.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and urine CC16 levels among asthmatics: A case-control study of children

Authors: Zhou, Y; Bao, WW; Qian, ZM; Dee Geiger, S; Parrish, KL; Yang, BY; Lee, YL; Dong, GH (2017) Environmental Research 159:158-163. HERO ID: 3981296

[Less] BACKGROUND: Studies have reported an association between serum perfluoroalkyl substances . . . [More] BACKGROUND: Studies have reported an association between serum perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and asthma. However, few studies have examined the possible associations between PFASs and the 16-kDa club cell secretory protein (Clara) (CC16) level, a prominent biomarker of asthma, among adolescents.

METHODS: We recruited a total of 231 asthmatic children and 225 non-asthmatic controls in the Genetic and Biomarkers study for Childhood Asthma (GBCA) in northern Taiwan from 2009 to 2010. Structured questionnaires were administered by face-to-face interview. Urine CC16 was determined by an enzyme-link immunoassay kit. Multiple general linear models were employed to examine the associations between PFASs and urinary CC16 levels.

RESULTS: Asthmatic participants had significantly higher serum PFAS concentrations overall than the healthy controls. After adjusting for confounding factors, urinary CC16 was significantly, negatively associated with PFASs, especially PFOS, PFOA, PFDA and PFNA, and especially among males, as follows: PFOS (β = -0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.004, -0.002), PFOA (β = -0.045, 95% CI: -0.086, -0.004), and PFHxA (β = -0.310, 95% CI: -0.455, -0.165) among asthmatic boys, and PFDA (β = -0.126, 95%CI: -0.241, -0.012) and PFNA (β = -0.329, 95% CI: -0.526, -0.132) among non-asthmatic boys. Among girls, PFDA (β = -0.088, 95% CI: -0.172, -0.004), was the only PFAS significantly associated with CC16. Significant interaction effects (p < 0.15) on CC16 levels were found between asthma and PFOS, PFOA, PFBS and PFHxA in all participants.

CONCLUSION: Our overall results showed that serum PFASs were significantly, inversely associated with CC16 levels. Associations were stronger among males.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Investigation of the best approach for assessing human exposure to poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances through indoor air

Authors: Padilla-Sánchez, JA; Papadopoulou, E; Poothong, S; Haug, LS (2017) Environmental Science and Technology 51:12836-12843. HERO ID: 4174662

[Less] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), perfluoroalkyl . . . [More] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), including fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), perfluoroalkyl sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs), and perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (FOSAs), were assessed in 61 residential indoor air and 15 personal air samples collected in Oslo area, Norway. FTOHs were detected in all samples, and the median concentrations in residential indoor air were 2970, 10400, and 3120 pg m-3 for 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 FTOH, respectively. This is similar to or higher than previously reported in studies from the same geographical area and worldwide. FOSEs and FOSAs were detected in 49-70% and 7-13% of the residential indoor air samples, respectively. The median FTOH concentrations observed in personal air were 1970, 7170, and 1590 pg m-3 for 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 FTOH, respectively, which is 30 to 50% lower than the median concentrations in residential indoor air. No FOSEs or FOSAs were detected above the method detection limit (MDL) in the personal air samples. Intakes of perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), perfluoroheptanoate (PFHpA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorodecanoate (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnDA), and perfluorooctyl sulfonate (PFOS) through inhalation and biotransformation of PFAS precursors in air were estimated. Median intakes of 1.7, 0.17, 5.7, 0.57, 1.8, 0.18, and 2.3 pg kg bw-1 day-1 were obtained in residential indoor air, while 1.0, 0.10, 3.3, 0.33, 0.88, and 0.09 pg kg bw-1 day-1 were found in personal air for PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, and PFOS, respectively. The median PFOA intakes from residential indoor air (5.7 pg kg bw-1 day-1) and personal air (3.3 pg kg bw-1 day-1) were both around 5 orders of magnitude lower than the tolerable daily intake (TDI) reported by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Distribution profiles of per- and poly fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and their re-regulation by ocean currents in the East and South China Sea

Authors: Zheng, H; Wang, F; Zhao, Z; Ma, Y; Yang, H; Lu, Z; Cai, M; Cai, M (2017) Marine Pollution Bulletin 125:481-486. HERO ID: 3981209

[Less] We investigated the distribution of 17 individual per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in 42 . . . [More] We investigated the distribution of 17 individual per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in 42 surface water samples collected from the East and South China Seas (7.0-36.0°N, 110.0°N-123.0°E). Concentrations of 7 individual PFASs, including perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA), perfluoroheptanoate (PFHpA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (FOSA), were quantified in the East China Sea, but only concentrations of PFOA and FOSA were quantified in the South China Sea. The total concentrations of the 17 PFASs ranged from 181 to 2658pg/L in the East China Sea and from 62 to 494pg/L in the South China Sea. We also show that river fluxes and ocean currents had a strong influence on the distribution of PFASs in the East China Sea. Using ArcGIS 10.1, we show how ocean currents control the spatial distribution of PFOA in the central South China Sea.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Serum concentrations of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances and factors associated with exposure in the general adult population in South Korea

Authors: Lee, JH; Lee, CK; Suh, CH; Kang, HS; Hong, CP; Choi, SN (2017) International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 220:1046-1054. HERO ID: 3858472

[Less] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous contaminants found worldwide, including in . . . [More] Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous contaminants found worldwide, including in South Korea. As a result, they are frequently detected in Koreans. However, there is limited representative data and information on potential sources in Korea. Therefore, we measured the serum concentrations of ten PFASs in nationally representative samples of the Korean population (n=1874, 18-69 years) and evaluated the factors associated with their exposure. Serum PFOS, PFDA, PFOA, and PFNA were detected in nearly all participants (83.1-99.9%). However, serum PFPA, PFHxA, and PFHpA were almost undetected (<0.5% of participants). PFOS had the highest population-weighted geometric mean of 10.23ng/mL (95% CI: 9.99-10.47), which was followed by PFOA with 2.85ng/mL (95% CI: 2.73-2.97) and PFDA with 2.17ng/mL (95% CI: 2.12-2.23). PFNA, PFDA, PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOS concentrations were higher in males (p<0.001) and older adults (p<0.001). PFNA was higher in those who used wax, polish, and water-resistant materials (adjusted proportional change=1.14; 95% CI: 1.08-1.22), and those who ate cooked fish (1.16; 95% CI: 1.03-1.31) compared to those who ate nearly no fish. PFDA was higher in those who used herbicides and pesticides (1.05; 95% CI: 1.02-1.09), those who drank beverages in a plastic bag on a daily basis (1.10; 95% CI: 1.03-1.19), and those who ate raw fish (1.15; 95% CI: 1.03-1.29) or cooked fish (1.13; 95% CI: 1.05-1.23) compared to those who ate nearly no fish. PFHxS was higher in those who used traditional Korean health supplement foods (1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.15). PFOA was higher in those who used plastic wrap in a microwave daily or weekly (1.08; 95% CI: 1.00-1.16), and those who used disposable paper cups (1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.13). PFOS was lower in underweight participants (0.84; 95%CI: 0.75-0.93) compared to those who were obese, and higher in those who exercised regularly (1.08; 95% CI: 1.03-1.14) or irregularly (1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.12) compared to those who did not exercise. Subjects who used severely damaged Teflon appliances had lower concentrations of PFOA (0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.95), while regular use of Gore-Tex goods was related to higher PFNA (1.15, 95% CI: 1.03-1.28) and PFDA (1.11; 95% CI: 1.02-1.20) levels. These findings suggest that most Koreans are frequently exposed to PFASs, and that serum concentrations of PFASs vary with age, sex, and exposure factors.