Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Gluconates (527-07-1, 299-27-4, 526-95-4, 90-80-2, & 299-28-5)


201 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Metabolomics analysis reveals potential mechanisms of tolerance to excess molybdenum in soybean seedlings

Authors: Xu, S; Hu, C; Hussain, S; Tan, Q; Wu, S; Sun, X (2018) Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety 164:589-596. HERO ID: 4830850

[Less] Most plants exhibit strong tolerance to excess molybdenum (Mo). However, the metabolic profile and tolerance . . . [More] Most plants exhibit strong tolerance to excess molybdenum (Mo). However, the metabolic profile and tolerance mechanisms of plants in response to excess Mo remain unknown. We comprehensively analyzed changes in the metabolic profiles of leaves and roots in soybean (Glycine max L.) seedlings cultured under normal-Mo and excess-Mo conditions by using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) combined with MS/MS (mass spectrometry). There were 42 differential metabolites in the roots and 19 differential metabolites in the leaves in response to excess Mo stress. In roots, the organic acids, levels of gluconic acid, D-glucarate and citric acid increased by 107.63-, 4.42- and 2.87-folds after excess Mo exposure. Several hormones (salicylic acid, jasmonic acid) and lipids (PG, MG, DG etc) also increased significantly under excess Mo condition. Metabolites related to ascorbate-glutathione metabolism and flavonoid and isoflavone biosynthesis notably accumulated in roots. Only lipid metabolism and salicylic acid accumulation were induced in leaves under excess Mo stress. It is speculated that organic compounds such as 2-oxoarginine, L-nicotine, gluconic acid, D-glucurate, and citric acid played important roles to chelate Mo and reduce its toxicity. Signaling molecules (JA, SA, and some lipids) and non-enzyme antioxidants such as flavonoids/isoflavones act synergistically to detoxify ROS and contribute to Mo tolerance in soybean seedlings. More metabolic pathways were induced by Mo excess in roots than in leaves, suggesting that roots play more implant role in Mo tolerance.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Development of an HPLC/UV method for the evaluation of extractables and leachables in plastic: Application to a plastic-packaged calcium gluconate glucoheptonate solution

Authors: Legrand, P; Desdion, A; Boccadifuoco, G; Dufaÿ Wojcicki, A; Worsley, A; Boudy, V; Dufay, SG (2018) Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis 155:298-305. HERO ID: 4837204

[Less] Calcium gluconate glucoheptonate (GGCa) is known to interact with glass containers, leading to the leaching . . . [More] Calcium gluconate glucoheptonate (GGCa) is known to interact with glass containers, leading to the leaching of aluminum from the glass into the solution at toxic level. Therefore, plastic containers seem to be a preferable packaging alternative. Nevertheless, plastics contain potentially toxic additives which could be released into the solution. In order to study content container interaction between GGCa and two plastic containers (polypropylene PP and polyethylene PE containers), an HPLC-PDA method was developed to separate, detect and quantify eleven additives commonly found in plastic materials, with good limit of detection and quantification. This method was then applied to evaluate the compatibility between GGCa and the two plastic containers. After 3 months of storage at 25 °C, none of the eleven additives were detected in GGCa solutions. The safety concern threshold (SCT) and of the analytical evaluation threshold (AET) were evaluated to discriminate the need to identify and qualify unknown peaks.

Technical Report
Technical Report

G06 - Ames summary data: gluono delta lactone

Author: NTP (2018) HERO ID: 4940109


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Nonenzymatic determination of glucose at near neutral pH values based on the use of nafion and platinum black coated microneedle electrode array

Authors: Chinnadayyala, SR; Park, I; Cho, S (2018) Microchimica Acta 185:250. HERO ID: 4946816

[Less] The authors report on a microneedle-based amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor for painless and . . . [More] The authors report on a microneedle-based amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor for painless and continuous monitoring of glucose. It consists of 3 × 5 sharp stainless steel microneedles micromachined from a stainless steel substrate. The microneedles are 600 and 100 μm in height and width, respectively. Nafion and platinum black were sequentially coated onto the tip of gold-coated microneedles and used for nonenzymatic (direct) sensing of glucose. Attractive features of the modified microneedle electrode include (a) a low working potential (+0.12 V vs. Ag/AgCl), (b) a linear response in the physiologically relevant range (1-40 mM), (c) a sensitivity as high as 175 μA mM-1 cm-2, (d) a 23 μM detection limit, and (e) a response time of 2 s. The sensor also exhibits good reproducibility and stability. The sensor is selective for glucose even in the presence of 10-fold higher concentrations of ascorbic acid, lactic acid, dopamine, uric acid, and acetaminophen. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of the fabrication sequence for a nonenzymatic electrochemical glucose sensor using Nafion and platinum black coated microneedle electrode array. The sensor is based on measuring the faradaic current at +0.12 V vs. Ag/AgCl by the direct electrochemical oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid on the surface of a Pt black sensing layer.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Full-Thickness Chemical Burn From Trifluoroacetic Acid: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

Authors: Rochlin, DH; Rajasingh, CM; Karanas, YL; Davis, DJ (2018) Annals of Plastic Surgery 81:528-530. HERO ID: 4946761

[Less] Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) burns are an ill-defined entity due to a lack of reported sizable burns from . . . [More] Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) burns are an ill-defined entity due to a lack of reported sizable burns from this chemical. In this case report of the largest reported burn from TFA, we demonstrate that TFA causes extensive, progressive full-thickness tissue injury that may initially appear superficial. Trifluoroacetic acid does not seem to involve the systemic toxicities that result from hydrofluoric acid burns, and there is no role for calcium gluconate in acute management based on this case. Operative intervention should be staged because wound beds may initially seem healthy yet demonstrate continued necrosis.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Rational Design of Yolk-Shell CuO/Silicalite-1@mSiO2 Composites for a High-Performance Nonenzymatic Glucose Biosensor

Authors: Cheng, X; Zhao, H; Huang, W; Chen, J; Wang, S; Dong, J; Deng, Y (2018) Langmuir 34:7663-7672. HERO ID: 4946771

[Less] In this study, an interface coassembly strategy is employed to rationally synthesize a yolk-shell CuO/silicalite-1@void@mSiO2 . . . [More] In this study, an interface coassembly strategy is employed to rationally synthesize a yolk-shell CuO/silicalite-1@void@mSiO2 composite consisting of silicalite-1 supported CuO nanoparticles confined in the hollow space of mesoporous silica, and the obtained composite materials were used as a novel nonenzymatic biosensor for highly sensitive and selective detecting glucose with excellent anti-interference ability. The synthesis of CuO/silicalite-1@mSiO2 includes four steps: coating silicalite-1 particles with resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer (RF), immobilization of copper species, interface deposition of a mesoporous silica layer, and final calcination in air to decompose RF and form CuO nanoparticles. The unique hierarchical porous structure with mesopores and micropores is beneficial to selectively enrich glucose for fast oxidation into gluconic acid. Besides, the mesopores in the silica shell can effectively inhibit the large interfering substances or biomacromolecules diffusing into the void as well as the loss of CuO nanoparticles. The hollow chamber inside serves as a nanoreactor for glucose oxidation catalyzed by the active CuO nanoparticles, which are spatially accessible for glucose molecules. The nonenzymatic glucose biosensors based on CuO/silicalite-1@mSiO2 materials show excellent electrocatalytic sensing performance with a wide linear range (5-500 μM), high sensitivity (5.5 μA·mM-1·cm-2), low detection limit (0.17 μM), and high selectivity against interfering species. Furthermore, the unique sensors even display a good capability in the determination of glucose in real blood serum samples.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Exercise-Induced Alterations in Skeletal Muscle, Heart, Liver, and Serum Metabolome Identified by Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis

Authors: Starnes, JW; Parry, TL; O'Neal, SK; Bain, , JR; Muehlbauer, MJ; Honcoop, A; Ilaiwy, A; Christopher, PM; Patterson, C; Willis, MS (2017) HERO ID: 3999778

[Less] BACKGROUND: The metabolic and physiologic responses to exercise are increasingly interesting, . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The metabolic and physiologic responses to exercise are increasingly interesting, given that regular physical activity enhances antioxidant capacity, improves cardiac function, and protects against type 2 diabetes. The metabolic interactions between tissues and the heart illustrate a critical cross-talk we know little about.

METHODS: To better understand the metabolic changes induced by exercise, we investigated skeletal muscle (plantaris, soleus), liver, serum, and heart from exercise trained (or sedentary control) animals in an established rat model of exercise-induced aerobic training via non-targeted GC-MS metabolomics.

RESULTS: Exercise-induced alterations in metabolites varied across tissues, with the soleus and serum affected the least. The alterations in the plantaris muscle and liver were most alike, with two metabolites increased in each (citric acid/isocitric acid and linoleic acid). Exercise training additionally altered nine other metabolites in the plantaris (C13 hydrocarbon, inosine/adenosine, fructose-6-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, 2-aminoadipic acid, heptadecanoic acid, stearic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and oleic acid). In the serum, we identified significantly decreased alpha-tocopherol levels, paralleling the increases identified in plantaris muscle. Eleven unique metabolites were increased in the heart, which were not affected in the other compartments (malic acid, serine, aspartic acid, myoinositol, glutamine, gluconic acid-6-phosphate, glutamic acid, pyrophosphate, campesterol, phosphoric acid, creatinine). These findings complement prior studies using targeted metabolomics approaches to determine the metabolic changes in exercise-trained human skeletal muscle. Specifically, exercise trained vastus lateralus biopsies had significantly increased linoleic acid, oleic acid, and stearic acid compared to the inactive groups, which were significantly increased in plantaris muscle in the present study.

CONCLUSIONS: While increases in alpha-tocopherol have not been identified in muscle after exercise to our knowledge, the benefits of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) supplementation in attenuating exercise-induced muscle damage has been studied extensively. Skeletal muscle, liver, and the heart have primarily different metabolic changes, with few similar alterations and rare complementary alterations (alpha-tocopherol), which may illustrate the complexity of understanding exercise at the organismal level.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Comparison of Salt Tolerance in Soja Based on Metabolomics of Seedling Roots

Authors: Li, M; Guo, R; Jiao, Y; Jin, X; Zhang, H; Shi, L (2017) HERO ID: 4943739

[Less] Soybean is an important economic crop that is continually threatened by abiotic stresses, especially . . . [More] Soybean is an important economic crop that is continually threatened by abiotic stresses, especially salt stress. Wild soybean is an important germplasm resource for the breeding of cultivated soybean. The root system plays a very important role in plant salt tolerance. To explore the salt tolerance-related mechanisms among Soja, we have demonstrated the seedling roots' growth and metabolomics in wild soybean, semi-wild soybean, and cultivated soybean under two types of salt stress by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We characterized 47 kinds of differential metabolites under neutral salt stress, and isoleucine, serine, l-allothreonine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, asparagines, aspartic acid, pentadecanoic acid, lignoceric acid, oleic acid, galactose, tagatose, d-arabitol, dihydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and glucuronic acid increased significantly in the roots of wild soybean seedlings. However, these metabolites were suppressed in semi-wild and cultivated soybeans. Amino acid, fatty acid, sugars, and organic acid synthesis and the secondary metabolism of antioxidants increased significantly in the roots of wild soybean seedling. Under alkaline salt stress, wild soybean contained significantly higher amounts of proline, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, l-allothreonine, isoleucine, serine, alanine, arachidic acid, oleic acid, cis-gondoic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, citric acid, malonic acid, gluconic acid, 5-methoxytryptamine, salicylic acid, and fluorene than semi-wild and cultivated soybeans. Our study demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and receiver operating characteristics (especially the metabolism of phenolic substances) of the seedling roots were important to resisting salt stress and showed a regular decreasing trend from wild soybean to cultivated soybean. The metabolomics's changes were critical factors in the evolution of salt tolerance among Soja. This study provides new insights into salt tolerance in soybean, and presents quantitative parameters for a salt tolerant soybean breeding system, which is conducive to the rational use and protection of wild soybean resources.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Cross-discipline team leader review: NDA 208418: calcium gluconate injection

Author: Zemskova, M (2017) (NDA 208418). HERO ID: 4940077

[Less] On May 16, 2016 Fresenius Kabi submitted a New Drng Application (NDA) for Calcium Gluconate Injection . . . [More] On May 16, 2016 Fresenius Kabi submitted a New Drng Application (NDA) for Calcium
Gluconate Injection under Section 505(b) (2) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The ST131 Escherichia coli H22 subclone from human intestinal microbiota: Comparison of genomic and phenotypic traits with those of the globally successful H30 subclone

Authors: Nicolas-Chanoine, MH; Petitjean, M; Mora, A; Mayer, N; Lavigne, JP; Boulet, O; Leflon-Guibout, V; Blanco, J; Hocquet, D (2017) BMC Microbiology 17:71. HERO ID: 4944772

[Less] BACKGROUND: In 2006, we found healthy subjects carrying ST131 Escherichia coli in their . . . [More] BACKGROUND: In 2006, we found healthy subjects carrying ST131 Escherichia coli in their intestinal microbiota consisting of two populations: a subdominant population of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli belonging to subclone H30 (H30-R or subclade C1), the current worldwide dominant ST131 subclone, and a dominant E. coli population composed of antibiotic-susceptible E. coli belonging to subclone H22 (clade B), the precursor of subclone H30. We sequenced the whole genome of fecal H22 strain S250, compared it to the genomes of ExPEC ST131 H30-Rx strain JJ1886 and commensal ST131 H41 strain SE15, sought the H22-H30 genomic differences in our fecal strains and assessed their phenotypic consequences.

RESULTS: We detected 173 genes found in the Virulence Factor Database, of which 148 were shared by the three ST131 genomes, whereas some were genome-specific, notably those allowing determination of virotype (D for S250 and C for JJ1886). We found three sequences of the FimH site involved in adhesion: two in S250 and SE15 close and identical, respectively, to that previously reported to confer strong intestinal adhesion, and one in JJ1886, corresponding to that commonly present in uropathogenic E. coli. Among the genes involved in sugar metabolism, one encoding a gluconate kinase lacked in S250 and JJ1886. Although this gene was also absent in both our fecal H22 and H30-R strains, H22 strains showed a higher capacity to grow in minimal medium with gluconate. Among the genes involved in gluconate metabolism, only the ghrB gene differed between S250/H22 and JJ1886/H30-R strains, resulting in different gluconate reductases. Of the genes involved in biofilm formation, two were absent in the three genomes and one, fimB, in the JJ1886 genome. Our fecal H30-R strains lacking intact fimB displayed delayed biofilm formation relative to our fecal H22 strains. The H22 strains differed by subclade B type and plasmid content, whereas the H30-R strains were identical.

CONCLUSIONS: Phenotypic analysis of our fecal strains based on observed genomic differences between S250 and JJ1886 strains suggests the presence of traits related to bacterial commensalism in our H22 strains and traits commonly found in uropathogenic E. coli in our H30-R strains.