Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Nutrient Stressors and Biological Responses

Show Project Details Hide Project Details
294 References Were Found:

Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation Thesis

Land-use and waterway quality at Mt. Grand Station, New Zealand

Author: Provost, SM (2018) (Master's Thesis). Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand. HERO ID: 5092179

[Less] This research project focuses on the waterways of Mt. Grand, a South Island High Country sheep station. . . . [More] This research project focuses on the waterways of Mt. Grand, a South Island High Country sheep station. The station is 2136 ha of mostly mountainous terrain, running fine wool merino sheep and a small herd of beef cattle. Nearby, flatter land has undergone agricultural intensification, and several higher altitude areas of the station have been converted to public conservation land through Tenure Review. Situated between these conversions, Mt. Grand Station faces intensified agronomic pressures to remain economically viable, which may affect the ecological quality of its waterways. The aim of this research was to monitor sedimentation levels and phosphate concentrations (variables closely associated with land-use intensification) in three different catchments containing contrasting land-use, and to investigate how these variables affect benthic macroinvertebrate habitat. Three streams in differing catchments were sampled at different altitudes for physicochemical parameters including phosphate concentrations, visual clarity and total suspended solids. Macroinvertebrate communities were also sampled, to investigate the ecological health of each sample site. The headwaters of each stream are in steep, high altitude areas of the station, transitioning to flatter terrain at lower altitudes as they flow out to the adjacent Hawea Flat. The steep slopes of Mt. Grand face soil erosion issues, and are a ready source of sedimentation to be mobilised to the waterways. Stock have unrestricted access to all of the streams. On three occasions during the year, stream waters were sampled for analysis of Total Phosphorus, Total Dissolved Phosphorus, cDGT and total suspended solids concentrations, as well as other associated physicochemical parameters. Total Phosphorus concentrations in riparian soils, and deposited stream sediment at each sample site were also sampled. The benthic macroinvertebrate communities were sampled to ascertain macroinvertebrate community index scores, and Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera taxa richness percentages.
Overall, the ecological quality of stream water quality was good, but the results have shown a reduction in quality at the bottom of one catchment. Phosphate and total suspended solids concentrations were highest in a catchment containing no significant native vegetation, and increased agricultural land-use. Thick layers of deposited sediment were observed at lower altitudes of this catchment on all research trips. At the lowest altitude sample site within the catchment, Total Phosphorus concentrations in multiple samples exceeded the trigger value set for upland New Zealand streams and rivers. The Total Dissolved Phosphorus results from this sample site also indicate that a management response may be required to ensure Mt. Grand Station meets its statutory responsibilities in regards to water quality under the relevant regional plan. The sample site at the bottom of this catchment also recorded the lowest macroinvertebrate community index scores, and the lowest percentages of observed pollution intolerant taxa. The combined results from all three catchments show a negative relationship between the observed percentages of sensitive macroinvertebrate taxa, and phosphate enrichment. The findings of this research will assist station management to make better-informed decisions as to where any management responses may be best implemented, helping them to meet their statutory responsibilities in regards to maintaining the ecological quality of the regions freshwater resources. This research project paid particular focus to Mt. Grand Station because it is managed by Lincoln University.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Benthic diatoms of the Ying River (Huaihe River Basin, China) and their application in water trophic status assessment

Authors: Shen, R; Ren, H; Yu, P; You, Q; Pang, W; Wang, Q (2018) Water 10:1013. HERO ID: 5092194


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Diatom tolerance metrics to identify total phosphorus as candidate cause of aquatic life impairment in Connecticut, USA freshwater streams

Authors: Becker, ME; Becker, TJ; Bellucci, CJ (2018) Ecological Indicators 93:638-646. HERO ID: 5092219

[Less] Anthropogenic phosphorus is a major driver of cultural eutrophication in rivers and streams, leading . . . [More] Anthropogenic phosphorus is a major driver of cultural eutrophication in rivers and streams, leading to numerous water quality impairments, including detrimental shifts in biological communities. Phosphorus has not been identified as a cause of aquatic life impairment in the State of Connecticut (CT), USA, rivers and streams. That is because phosphorus effects on aquatic life are complex, varying spatially and temporally, and often have indirect effects on biological communities typically used for water quality assessment, such as macroinvertebrates and fish. Biological tolerance metrics can be useful in identifying biological impairments due to pollutants that do not lend themselves to conventional toxicity testing, like phosphorus, by providing a measure of the sensitivity of aquatic organisms to anthropogenic disturbance over time. Diatom species tolerances to phosphorus have been derived at national and regional scales in the USA, but not specifically for CT. National scale studies often have the advantage of utilizing larger datasets to derive tolerances over a wide range of environmental conditions, however, developing tolerances specific to a region or for CT may better capture localized conditions. Our study aims to identify diatom species tolerance value metrics suited to aiding aquatic life assessments in CT. We developed diatom tolerance metrics using two different methods that combined responses of individual diatom species along the observed phosphorus gradient using data collected in CT. We then compared the existing national and regional diatom tolerance metrics to the CT tolerance metrics. Our results found the best performing metrics for use in CT aquatic life assessments were CT tolerance values derived using a generalized additive modeling approach. These metrics were CT specific, discriminated well between high and low levels of phosphorus concentrations, and had a greater response to phosphorus than alternative ecological gradients (chloride, pH, and water temperature) that also affect diatom species composition. These results show that diatom tolerance metrics for phosphorus can be effectively used in a weight of evidence approach to identify phosphorus as a cause of aquatic life impairment in CT. All source code and data for this project is freely available and open source at: https://github.com/marybecker/DiatomTPMetrics.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Assessing the influence of multiple stressors on stream diatom metrics in the upper Midwest, USA

Authors: Munn, MD; Waite, Ian; Konrad, CP (2018) Ecological Indicators 85:1239-1248. HERO ID: 5092223


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Biogeographical Patterns of Species Richness and Abundance Distribution in Stream Diatoms Are Driven by Climate and Water Chemistry

Authors: Passy, SI; Larson, CA; Jamoneau, A; Budnick, W; Heino, J; Leboucher, T; Tison-Rosebery, J; Soininen, J (2018) American Naturalist 192:605-617. HERO ID: 5093369

[Less] In this intercontinental study of stream diatoms, we asked three important but still unresolved ecological . . . [More] In this intercontinental study of stream diatoms, we asked three important but still unresolved ecological questions: (1) What factors drive the biogeography of species richness and species abundance distribution (SAD)? (2) Are climate-related hypotheses, which have dominated the research on the latitudinal and altitudinal diversity gradients, adequate in explaining spatial biotic variability? and (3) Is the SAD response to the environment independent of richness? We tested a number of climatic theories and hypotheses (i.e., the species-energy theory, the metabolic theory, the energy variability hypothesis, and the climatic tolerance hypothesis) but found no support for any of these concepts, as the relationships of richness with explanatory variables were nonexistent, weak, or unexpected. Instead, we demonstrated that diatom richness and SAD evenness generally increased with temperature seasonality and at mid- to high total phosphorus concentrations. The spatial patterns of diatom richness and the SAD-mainly longitudinal in the United States but latitudinal in Finland-were defined primarily by the covariance of climate and water chemistry with space. The SAD was not entirely controlled by richness, emphasizing its utility for ecological research. Thus, we found support for the operation of both climate and water chemistry mechanisms in structuring diatom communities, which underscores their complex response to the environment and the necessity for novel predictive frameworks.

Journal Article
Journal Article

Assessment of river quality in a subtropical Austral river system: a combined approach using benthic diatoms and macroinvertebrates

Authors: Nhiwatiwa, T; Dalu, T; Sithole, T (2017) HERO ID: 4459411


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Water quality variables and pollution sources shaping stream macroinvertebrate communities

Authors: Berger, E; Haase, P; Kuemmerlen, M; Leps, M; Schäfer, RB; Sundermann, A (2017) Science of the Total Environment 587-588:1-10. HERO ID: 5087596

[Less] In 2015, over 90 percent of German rivers failed to reach a good ecological status as demanded by the . . . [More] In 2015, over 90 percent of German rivers failed to reach a good ecological status as demanded by the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). Deficits in water quality, mainly from diffuse pollution such as agricultural run-off, but also from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), have been suggested as important drivers of this decline in ecological quality. We modelled six macroinvertebrate based metrics indicating ecological quality for 184 streams in response to a) PCA-derived water quality gradients, b) individual water quality variables and c) catchment land use and wastewater exposure indices as pollution drivers. The aim was to evaluate the relative importance of key water quality variables and their sources. Indicator substances (i.e. carbamazepine and caffeine indicating wastewater exposure; herbicides indicating agricultural run-off) represented micropollutants in the analyses and successfully related water quality variables to pollution sources. Arable and urban catchment land covers were strongly associated with reduced ecological quality. Electric conductivity, oxygen concentration, caffeine, silicate and toxic units with respect to pesticides were identified as the most significant in-stream predictors in this order. Our results underline the importance to manage diffuse pollution, if ecological quality is to be improved. However, we also found a clear impact of wastewater on ecological quality through caffeine. Thus, improvement of WWTPs, especially preventing the release of poorly treated wastewater, will benefit freshwater communities.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

DNA metabarcoding and morphological macroinvertebrate metrics reveal the same changes in boreal watersheds across an environmental gradient

Authors: Emilson, CE; Thompson, DG; Venier, LA; Porter, TM; Swystun, T; Chartrand, D; Capell, S; Hajibabaei, M (2017) Scientific Reports 7:12777. HERO ID: 5093529

[Less] Cost-effective, ecologically relevant, sensitive, and standardized indicators are requisites of biomonitoring. . . . [More] Cost-effective, ecologically relevant, sensitive, and standardized indicators are requisites of biomonitoring. DNA metabarcoding of macroinvertebrate communities is a potentially transformative biomonitoring technique that can reduce cost and time constraints while providing information-rich, high resolution taxonomic data for the assessment of watershed condition. Here, we assess the utility of DNA metabarcoding to provide aquatic indicator data for evaluation of forested watershed condition across Canadian eastern boreal watersheds, subject to natural variation and low-intensity harvest management. We do this by comparing the similarity of DNA metabarcoding and morphologically derived macroinvertebrate metrics (i.e. richness, % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera, % chironomid), and the ability of DNA metabarcoding and morphological metrics to detect key gradients in stream condition linked to forested watershed features. Our results show consistency between methods, where common DNA metabarcoding and morphological macroinvertebrate metrics are positively correlated and indicate the same key gradients in stream condition (i.e. dissolved oxygen, and dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen and conductivity) linked to watershed size and shifts in forest composition across watersheds. Our study demonstrates the potential usefulness of macroinvertebrate DNA metabarcoding to future application in broad-scale biomonitoring of watershed condition across environmental gradients.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Evaluation of eutrophication of Ostravice river depending on the chemical and physical parameters

Authors: Hlavac, A; Melcakova, I; Novakova, J; Svehlakova, H; Slavikova, L; Klimsa, L; Bartkova, M (2017) I O P Conference Series: Earth and Environment 92. HERO ID: 5097740


Technical Report
Technical Report

Water and sediment quality along the Illinois waterway from the Lockport Lock to the Peoria Lock between 1977–2011: An overview

Authors: Minarik, TA, Jr; Wasik, JL (2017) (Report no. 17-24). Chicago, IL: Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago. HERO ID: 5097847