Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Naphthalene


15,934 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Comparison of photocatalytic degradation of dyes in relation to their structure

Authors: Byberg, R; Cobb, J; Martin, LD; Thompson, RW; Camesano, TA; Zahraa, O; Pons, MN (In Press) Environmental Science and Pollution Research. HERO ID: 1501213

[Less] The photocatalytic degradation of a series of six acid dyes (Direct Red 80, Direct Red 81, Direct Red . . . [More] The photocatalytic degradation of a series of six acid dyes (Direct Red 80, Direct Red 81, Direct Red 23, Direct Violet 51, Direct Yellow 27, and Direct Yellow 50) has been tested compared in terms of color removal, mineralization, and toxicity (Lactuca sativa L. test) after photocatalysis on immobilized titanium dioxide. The dyes were examined at their natural pH and after hydrolysis at pH 12. Results show that hydrolysis decreases strongly the efficiency of color removal, that full mineralization takes much longer reaction time than color removal, and that toxicity is only very partially reduced. Some structural parameters, related to the structure and the topology of the dye molecules, could be correlated with the apparent color removal rates at natural pH.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Carcinogenicity of quinoline, styrene, and styrene-7,8-oxide

Author: IARC Monograph Working Group (2018) The Lancet Oncology 19:728-729. HERO ID: 4337444

[Less] In March, 2018, a Working Group of 23 scientists from 12 countries met at the International Agency for . . . [More] In March, 2018, a Working Group of 23 scientists from 12 countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France, to finalise their evaluation of the carcinogenicity of quinoline, styrene, and styrene-7,8-oxide. This assessment will be published in Volume 121 of the IARC Monographs.

Meeting/Symposium
Presentation

National Academy of Sciences committee to review advances made to the IRIS process

Authors: Bahadori, T; Thayer, K (2018) presented at National Academy of Sciences Review of Advances Made to the IRIS Process: A Workshop, February 1-2, 2018, Washington, D.C.. [Presentation] HERO ID: 4229674


Meeting/Symposium
Presentation

In vitro model of the hepatic contribution to lung epithelial cell toxicity induced by ethylbenzene, styrene, and naphthalene

Authors: Kelty, JS; Ding, X; Van Winkle, LS (2018) presented at SOT Annual Meeting, March 11-15, 2018, San Antonio, Texas. [Poster] HERO ID: 4440630


Technical Report
Technical Report

Styrene, styrene-7,8-oxide, and quinoline

Author: IARC Monograph Working Group (2018) Lyon, France: IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. [IARC Monograph] HERO ID: 4338178


Technical Report
Technical Report

Fourth national report on human exposure to environmental chemicals, updated tables, March 2018, volume one

Author: CDC (2018) Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. HERO ID: 4358881

[Less] The Fourth Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Updated Tables, March 2018 (the Updated . . . [More] The Fourth Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Updated Tables, March
2018 (the Updated Tables, March 2018) presents nationally representative, cumulative
biomonitoring data gathered from 1999–2000 through 2015-2016. It includes all the data from
each of the previous National Reports on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals and
each of the previous Updated Tables (collectively, the Report and Updated Tables).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mediterranean diet adherence and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer: results of a cohort study and meta-analysis

Authors: van den Brandt, PA; Schulpen, M (2017) International Journal of Cancer 140:2220-2231. HERO ID: 3692151

[Less] The Mediterranean Diet (MD) has been associated with reduced mortality and risk of cardiovascular diseases, . . . [More] The Mediterranean Diet (MD) has been associated with reduced mortality and risk of cardiovascular diseases, but there is only limited evidence on cancer. We investigated the relationship between adherence to MD and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (and estrogen/progesterone receptor subtypes, ER/PR). In the Netherlands Cohort Study, 62,573 women aged 55-69 years provided information on dietary and lifestyle habits in 1986. Follow-up for cancer incidence until 2007 (20.3 years) consisted of record linkages with the Netherlands Cancer Registry and the Dutch Pathology Registry PALGA. Adherence to MD was estimated through the alternate Mediterranean Diet Score excluding alcohol. Multivariate case-cohort analyses were based on 2,321 incident breast cancer cases and 1,665 subcohort members with complete data on diet and potential confounders. We also conducted meta-analyses of our results with those of other published cohort studies. We found a statistically significant inverse association between MD adherence and risk of ER negative (ER-) breast cancer, with a hazard ratio of 0.60 (95% Confidence Interval, 0.39-0.93) for high versus low MD adherence (ptrend  = 0.032). MD adherence showed only nonsignificant weak inverse associations with ER positive (ER+) or total breast cancer risk. In meta-analyses, summary HRs for high versus low MD adherence were 0.94 for total postmenopausal breast cancer, 0.98 for ER+, 0.73 for ER- and 0.77 for ER - PR- breast cancer. Our findings support an inverse association between MD adherence and, particularly, receptor negative breast cancer. This may have important implications for prevention because of the poorer prognosis of these breast cancer subtypes.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Formation and biological targets of quinones: Cytotoxic versus cytoprotective effects

Authors: Bolton, JL; Dunlap, T (2017) Chemical Research in Toxicology 30:13-37. HERO ID: 4305164

[Less] Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates, which can create a variety of hazardous effects . . . [More] Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates, which can create a variety of hazardous effects in vivo including, acute cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. In contrast, quinones can induce cytoprotection through the induction of detoxification enzymes, anti-inflammatory activities, and modification of redox status. The mechanisms by which quinones cause these effects can be quite complex. The various biological targets of quinones depend on their rate and site of formation and their reactivity. Quinones are formed through a variety of mechanisms from simple oxidation of catechols/hydroquinones catalyzed by a variety of oxidative enzymes and metal ions to more complex mechanisms involving initial P450-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions followed by two-electron oxidation. Quinones are Michael acceptors, and modification of cellular processes could occur through alkylation of crucial cellular proteins and/or DNA. Alternatively, quinones are highly redox active molecules which can redox cycle with their semiquinone radical anions leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ultimately the hydroxyl radical. Production of ROS can alter redox balance within cells through the formation of oxidized cellular macromolecules including lipids, proteins, and DNA. This perspective explores the varied biological targets of quinones including GSH, NADPH, protein sulfhydryls [heat shock proteins, P450s, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), glutathione S-transferase (GST), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, (NQO1), kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), IκB kinase (IKK), and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)], and DNA. The evidence strongly suggests that the numerous mechanisms of quinone modulations (i.e., alkylation versus oxidative stress) can be correlated with the known pathology/cytoprotection of the parent compound(s) that is best described by an inverse U-shaped dose-response curve.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Host Range of the Conjugative Transfer System of IncP-9 Naphthalene-Catabolic Plasmid NAH7 and Characterization of Its oriT Region and Relaxase

Authors: Kishida, K; Inoue, K; Ohtsubo, Y; Nagata, Y; Tsuda, M (2017) Applied and Environmental Microbiology 83. HERO ID: 3453084

[Less] NAH7 and pWW0 from gammaproteobacterial Pseudomonas putida strains are IncP-9 conjugative plasmids that . . . [More] NAH7 and pWW0 from gammaproteobacterial Pseudomonas putida strains are IncP-9 conjugative plasmids that carry the genes for degradation of naphthalene and toluene, respectively. Although such genes on these plasmids are well-characterized, experimental investigation of their conjugation systems remains at a primitive level. To clarify these conjugation systems, in this study, we investigated the NAH7-encoded conjugation system by (i) analyzing the origin of its conjugative transfer (oriT)-containing region and its relaxase, which specifically nicks within the oriT region for initiation of transfer, and (ii) comparing the conjugation systems between NAH7 and pWW0. The NAH7 oriT (oriTN) region was located within a 430-bp fragment, and the strand-specific nicking (nic) site and its upstream sequences that were important for efficient conjugation in the oriTN region were identified. Unlike many other relaxases, the NAH7 relaxase exhibited unique features in its ability to catalyze, in a conjugation-independent manner, the site-specific intramolecular recombination between two copies of the oriTN region, between two copies of the pWW0 oriT (oriTW) region (which is clearly different from the oriTN region), and between the oriTN and oriTW regions. The pWW0 relaxase, which is also clearly different from the NAH7 relaxase, was strongly suggested to have the ability to conjugatively and efficiently mobilize the oriTN-containing plasmid. Such a plasmid was, in the presence of the NAH7Δnic derivative, conjugatively transferable to alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial strains in which the NAH7 replication machinery is nonfunctional, indicating that the NAH7 conjugation system has a broader host range than its replication system.

IMPORTANCE: Various studies have strongly suggested an important contribution of conjugative transfer of catabolic plasmids to the rapid and wide dissemination of the plasmid-loaded degradation genes to microbial populations. Degradation genes on such plasmids are often loaded on transposons, which can be inserted into the genomes of the recipient bacterial strains where the transferred plasmids cannot replicate. The aim was to advance detailed molecular knowledge of the determinants of host range for plasmids. This aim is expected to be easily and comprehensively achieved using an experimental strategy in which the oriT region is connected with a plasmid that has a broad host range of replication. Using such a strategy in this study, we showed that (i) the NAH7 oriT-relaxase system has unique properties that are significantly different from other well-studied systems and (ii) the host range of the NAH7 conjugation system is broader than previously thought.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

An integrated approach for identifying priority contaminant in the Great Lakes Basin - Investigations in the Lower Green Bay/Fox River and Milwaukee Estuary areas of concern

Authors: Li, S; Villeneuve, DL; Berninger, JP; Blackwell, BR; Cavallin, JE; Hughes, MN; Jensen, KM; Jorgenson, Z; Kahl, MD; Schroeder, AL; Stevens, KE; Thomas, LM; Weberg, MA; Ankley, GT (2017) Science of the Total Environment 579:825-837. HERO ID: 3453039

[Less] Environmental assessment of complex mixtures typically requires integration of chemical and biological . . . [More] Environmental assessment of complex mixtures typically requires integration of chemical and biological measurements. This study demonstrates the use of a combination of instrumental chemical analyses, effects-based monitoring, and bio-effects prediction approaches to help identify potential hazards and priority contaminants in two Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), the Lower Green Bay/Fox River located near Green Bay, WI, USA and the Milwaukee Estuary, located near Milwaukee, WI, USA. Fathead minnows were caged at four sites within each AOC (eight sites total). Following 4d of in situ exposure, tissues and biofluids were sampled and used for targeted biological effects analyses. Additionally, 4d composite water samples were collected concurrently at each caged fish site and analyzed for 132 analytes as well as evaluated for total estrogenic and androgenic activity using cell-based bioassays. Of the analytes examined, 75 were detected in composite samples from at least one site. Based on multiple analyses, one site in the East River and another site near a paper mill discharge in the Lower Green Bay/Fox River AOC, were prioritized due to their estrogenic and androgenic activity, respectively. The water samples from other sites generally did not exhibit significant estrogenic or androgenic activity, nor was there evidence for endocrine disruption in the fish exposed at these sites as indicated by the lack of alterations in ex vivo steroid production, circulating steroid concentrations, or vitellogenin mRNA expression in males. Induction of hepatic cyp1a mRNA expression was detected at several sites, suggesting the presence of chemicals that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. To expand the scope beyond targeted investigation of endpoints selected a priori, several bio-effects prediction approaches were employed to identify other potentially disturbed biological pathways and related chemical constituents that may warrant future monitoring at these sites. For example, several chemicals such as diethylphthalate and naphthalene, and genes and related pathways, such as cholinergic receptor muscarinic 3 (CHRM3), estrogen receptor alpha1 (esr1), chemokine ligand 10 protein (CXCL10), tumor protein p53 (p53), and monoamine oxidase B (Maob), were identified as candidates for future assessments at these AOCs. Overall, this study demonstrates that a better prioritization of contaminants and associated hazards can be achieved through integrated evaluation of multiple lines of evidence. Such prioritization can guide more comprehensive follow-up risk assessment efforts.