Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Naphthalene


72 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for naphthalene with inhalation and skin routes of exposure

Authors: Kapraun, DF; Schlosser, PM; Nylander-French, LA; Kim, D; Yost, EE; Druwe, IL (2020) Journal of Toxicological Sciences July. HERO ID: 6640546

[Less] Naphthalene, a volatile organic compound present in moth repellants and petroleum-based fuels, has been . . . [More] Naphthalene, a volatile organic compound present in moth repellants and petroleum-based fuels, has been shown to induce toxicity in mice and rats during chronic inhalation exposures. While simpler default methods exist for extrapolating toxicity points of departure from animals to humans, using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to perform such extrapolations is generally preferred. Confidence in PBPK models increases when they have been validated using both animal and human in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) data. A published inhalation PBPK model for naphthalene was previously shown to predict rodent PK data well, so we sought to evaluate this model using human PK data. The most reliable human data available come from a controlled skin exposure study, but the inhalation PBPK model does not include a skin exposure route; therefore, we extended the model by incorporating compartments representing the stratum corneum and the viable epidermis and parameters that determine absorption and rate of transport through the skin. The human data revealed measurable blood concentrations of naphthalene present in the subjects prior to skin exposure, so we also introduced a continuous dose-rate parameter to account for these baseline blood concentration levels. We calibrated the three new parameters in the modified PBPK model using data from the controlled skin exposure study but did not modify values for any other parameters. Model predictions then fell within a factor of two of most (96%) of the human PK observations, demonstrating that this model can accurately predict internal doses of naphthalene and is thus a viable tool for use in human health risk assessment.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Influence of airborne particulates on respiratory tract deposition of inhaled toluene and naphthalene in the rat

Authors: Roberts, SM; Rohr, AC; Mikheev, VB; Munson, J; Sabo-Attwood, T (2018) Inhalation Toxicology 30:19-28. HERO ID: 4730996

[Less] OBJECTIVE: Most studies report that inhaled volatile and semivolatile organic compounds . . . [More] OBJECTIVE: Most studies report that inhaled volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs/SVOCs) tend to deposit in the upper respiratory tract, while ultrafine (or near ultrafine) particulate matter (PM) (∼100 nm) reaches the lower airways. The objective of this study was to determine whether carbon particle co-exposure carries VOCs/SVOCs deeper into the lungs where they are deposited.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by inhalation (nose-only) to radiolabeled toluene (20 ppm) or naphthalene (20 ppm) on a single occasion for 1 h, with or without concurrent carbon particle exposure (∼5 mg/m3). The distribution of radiolabel deposited within the respiratory tract of each animal was determined after sacrifice. The extent of adsorption of toluene and naphthalene to airborne carbon particles under the exposure conditions of the study was also assessed.

RESULTS: We found that in the absence of particles, the highest deposition of both naphthalene and toluene was observed in the upper respiratory tract. Co-exposure with carbon particles tended to increase naphthalene deposition slightly throughout the respiratory tract, whereas slight decreases in toluene deposition were observed. Few differences were statistically significant. Naphthalene showed greater adsorption to the particles compared to toluene, but overall the particle-adsorbed concentration of each of these compounds was a small fraction of the total inspired concentration.

CONCLUSIONS: These studies imply that at the concentrations used for the exposures in this study, inhaled carbon particles do not substantially alter the deposition of naphthalene and toluene within the respiratory tract.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Lung regeneration after toxic injury is improved in absence of dioxin receptor

Authors: Morales-Hernández, A; Nacarino-Palma, A; Moreno-Marín, N; Barrasa, E; Paniagua-Quiñones, B; Catalina-Fernández, I; Alvarez-Barrientos, A; Bustelo, XR; Merino, JM; Fernández-Salguero, PM (2017) Stem Cell Research 25:61-71. HERO ID: 5018522

[Less] Recent experimental evidences from cellular systems and from mammalian and non-mammalian animal models . . . [More] Recent experimental evidences from cellular systems and from mammalian and non-mammalian animal models highlight novel functions for the aryl hydrocarbon/dioxin receptor (AhR) in maintaining cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis. Notably, AhR depletion stimulates an undifferentiated and pluripotent phenotype likely associated to a mesenchymal transition in epithelial cells and to increased primary tumorigenesis and metastasis in melanoma. In this work, we have used a lung model of epithelial regeneration to investigate whether AhR regulates proper tissue repair by adjusting the expansion of undifferentiated stem-like cells. AhR-null mice developed a faster and more efficient repair of the lung bronchiolar epithelium upon naphthalene injury that required increased cell proliferation and the earlier activation of stem-like Clara, Basal and neuroepithelial cells precursors. Increased basal content in multipotent Sca1+/CD31-/CD4- cells and in cells expressing pluripotency factors NANOG and OCT4 could also improve re-epithelialization in AhR-null lungs. The reduced response of AhR-deficient lungs to Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) repression shortly after injury may also help their improved bronchiolar epithelium repair. These results support a role for AhR in the regenerative response against toxins, and open the possibility of modulating its activation level to favor recovery from lesions caused by environmental contaminants.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Treatment with a programmed cell death-1-specific antibody has little effect on afatinib- and naphthalene-induced acute pneumonitis in mice

Authors: Hamada, N; Yanagihara, T; Suzuki, K; Ogata-Suetsugu, S; Harada, E; Mikumo, H; Arimura-Omori, M; Nakanishi, Y (2017) Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 491:656-661. HERO ID: 3993855

[Less] Although several antibodies developed to target programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1) . . . [More] Although several antibodies developed to target programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1) have demonstrated great promise for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other malignancies, these therapeutic antibodies can cause pneumonitis. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI)-induced pneumonitis was reported after treatment with anti PD-1 antibodies. We previously demonstrated that mice with naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury developed severe gefitinib-induced pneumonitis through a neutrophil-dependent mechanism. The present study aimed to investigate whether treatment with afatinib, an EGFR-TKI that effectively targets EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC, and anti PD-1 antibodies induces pneumonitis in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated intraperitoneally with naphthalene (200 mg/kg) on day 0. Afatinib (20 mg/kg) was administered orally on days -1 to 13. An anti-PD-1 antibody (0.2 mg/mice) was also administered intraperitoneally every 3 days from day 1 until day 13. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were sampled on day 14. As observed previously with gefitinib, afatinib significantly increased the severity of histopathologic findings and the level of protein in BALF on day 14, compared to treatment with naphthalene alone. A combined anti-PD-1 antibody and afatinib treatment after naphthalene administration had yielded the same histopathological grade of lung inflammation as did afatinib treatment alone. Our results suggest that anti-PD-1 antibody treatment has little effect on afatinib-induced lung injury.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

JP8 exposure and neurocognitive performance among US Air Force personnel

Authors: Heaton, KJ; Maule, AL; Smith, KW; Rodrigues, EG; Mcclean, MD; Proctor, SP (2017) NeuroToxicology 62:170-180. HERO ID: 3993884

[Less] Petroleum-based fuels such as jet propellant (JP) 4, JP5, JP8, and jet A1 (JetA) are among the most . . . [More] Petroleum-based fuels such as jet propellant (JP) 4, JP5, JP8, and jet A1 (JetA) are among the most common occupational chemical exposures encountered by military and civilian workforces. Although acute toxicity following high-level exposures to JP8 and similar chemical mixtures has been reported, the relationship between persistent low-level occupational exposures to jet fuels and both acute and longer-term central nervous system (CNS) function has been comparatively less well characterized. This paper describes results of neurocognitive assessments acquired repeatedly across a work week study design (Friday to Friday) as part of the Occupational JP8 Exposure Neuroepidemiology Study (OJENES) involving U.S. Air Force (AF) personnel with varying levels of exposure to jet fuel (JP8). JP8 exposure levels were quantified using both personal air monitoring and urinary biomarkers of exposure. Neurocognitive performance was evaluated using an objective, standardized battery of tests. No significant associations with neurocognitive performances were observed between individuals having regular contact and those with minimal/no direct contact with JP8 (measured by average work week levels of personal breathing zone exposure). Also, no significant findings were noted between repeated measures of absorbed dose (multi-day pre-shift urinary 1- and 2-naphthol) and reduced proficiency on neurocognitive tasks across the work week. Results suggest that occupational exposure to lower (than regulated standards) levels of JP8 do not appear to be associated with acute, measurable differences or changes in neurocognitive performance.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Impact of hepatic P450-mediated biotransformation on the disposition and respiratory tract toxicity of inhaled naphthalene

Authors: Kovalchuk, N; Kelty, J; Li, L; Hartog, M; Zhang, QY; Edwards, P; Van Winkle, L; Ding, X (2017) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 329:1-8. HERO ID: 3993984

[Less] We determined whether a decrease in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 activity would impact lung toxicity . . . [More] We determined whether a decrease in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 activity would impact lung toxicity induced by inhalation exposure to naphthalene (NA), a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The liver-Cpr-null (LCN) mouse showed decreases in microsomal metabolism of NA in liver, but not lung, compared to wild-type (WT) mouse. Plasma levels of NA and NA-glutathione conjugates (NA-GSH) were both higher in LCN than in WT mice after a 4-h nose-only NA inhalation exposure at 10ppm. Levels of NA were also higher in lung and liver of LCN, compared to WT, mice, following exposure to NA at 5 or 10ppm. Despite the large increase in circulating and lung tissue NA levels, the level of NA-GSH, a biomarker of NA bioactivation, was either not different, or only slightly higher, in lung and liver tissues of LCN mice, relative to that in WT mice. Furthermore, the extent of NA-induced acute airway injury, judging from high-resolution lung histopathology and morphometry at 20h following NA exposure, was not higher, but lower, in LCN than in WT mice. These results, while confirming the ability of extrahepatic organ to bioactivate inhaled NA and mediate NA's lung toxicity, suggest that liver P450-generated NA metabolites also have a significant, although relatively small, contribution to airway toxicity of inhaled NA. This hepatic contribution to the airway toxicity of inhaled NA may be an important risk factor for individuals with diminished bioactivation activity in the lung.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Naphthalene cytotoxicity in microsomal epoxide hydrolase deficient mice

Authors: Carratt, SA; Morin, D; Buckpitt, AR; Edwards, PC; Van Winkle, LS (2016) Toxicology Letters 246:35-41. HERO ID: 3452634

[Less] Naphthalene (NA) is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are widely exposed. 1,2-Dihydro-1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene . . . [More] Naphthalene (NA) is a ubiquitous pollutant to which humans are widely exposed. 1,2-Dihydro-1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene (NA-dihydrodiol) is a major metabolite of NA generated by microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH). To investigate the role of the NA-dihydrodiol and subsequent metabolites (i.e. 1,2-naphthoquinone) in cytotoxicity, we exposed both male and female wild type (WT) and mEH null mice (KO) to NA by inhalation (5, 10, 20 ppm for 4h). NA-dihydrodiol was ablated in the KO mice. High-resolution histopathology was used to study site-specific cytotoxicity, and formation of naphthalene metabolites was measured by HPLC in microdissected airways. Swollen and vacuolated airway epithelial cells were observed in the intra- and extrapulmonary airways of all mice at and below the current OSHA standard (10 ppm). Female mice may be more susceptible to this acute cytotoxicity. In the extrapulmonary airways, WT mice were more susceptible to damage than KO mice, indicating that the metabolites associated with mEH-mediated metabolism could be partially responsible for cytotoxicity at this site. The level of cytotoxicity in the mEH KO mice at all airway levels suggests that non-mEH metabolites are contributing to NA cellular damage in the lung. Our results indicate that the apparent contribution of mEH-dependent metabolites to toxicity differs by location in the lung. These studies suggest that metabolites generated through the mEH pathway may be of minor importance in distal airway toxicity and subsequent carcinogenesis from NA exposure.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Alterations in the proteome of the respiratory tract in response to single and multiple exposures to naphthalene

Authors: Kültz, D; Li, J; Sacchi, R; Morin, D; Buckpitt, A; Van Winkle, L (2015) Proteomics 15:2655-2668. HERO ID: 3035745

[Less] Protein adduction is considered to be critical to the loss of cellular homeostasis associated with environmental . . . [More] Protein adduction is considered to be critical to the loss of cellular homeostasis associated with environmental chemicals undergoing metabolic activation. Despite considerable effort, our understanding of the key proteins mediating the pathologic consequences from protein modification by electrophiles is incomplete. This work focused on naphthalene (NA) induced acute injury of respiratory epithelial cells and tolerance which arises after multiple toxicant doses to define the initial cellular proteomic response and later protective actions related to tolerance. Airways and nasal olfactory epithelium from mice exposed to 15 ppm NA either for 4 h (acute) or for 4 h/day × 7 days (tolerant) were used for label-free protein quantitation by LC/MS/MS. Cytochrome P450 2F2 and secretoglobin 1A1 are decreased dramatically in airways of mice exposed for 4 h, a finding consistent with the fact that CYPs are localized primarily in Clara cells. A number of heat shock proteins and protein disulfide isomerases, which had previously been identified as adduct targets for reactive metabolites from several lung toxicants, were upregulated in airways but not olfactory epithelium of tolerant mice. Protein targets that are upregulated in tolerance may be key players in the pathophysiology associated with reactive metabolite protein adduction. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000846 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000846).

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

EPHECT II: Exposure assessment to household consumer products

Authors: Dimitroulopoulou, C; Trantallidi, M; Carrer, P; Efthimiou, GC; Bartzis, JG (2015) Science of the Total Environment 536:890-902. HERO ID: 2993418

[Less] Within the framework of the EPHECT project (Emissions, exposure patterns and health effects of consumer . . . [More] Within the framework of the EPHECT project (Emissions, exposure patterns and health effects of consumer products in the EU), irritative and respiratory health effects were assessed in relation to acute and long-term exposure to key and emerging indoor air pollutants emitted during household use of selected consumer products. In this context, inhalation exposure assessment was carried out for six selected 'target' compounds (acrolein, formaldehyde, benzene, naphthalene, d-limonene and α-pinene). This paper presents the methodology and the outcomes from the micro-environmental modelling of the 'target' pollutants following single or multiple use of selected consumer products and the subsequent exposure assessment. The results indicate that emissions from consumer products of benzene and α-pinene were not considered to contribute significantly to the EU indoor background levels, in contrast to some cases of formaldehyde and d-limonene emissions in Eastern Europe (mainly from cleaning products). The group of housekeepers in East Europe appears to experience the highest exposures to acrolein, formaldehyde and benzene, followed by the group of the retired people in North, who experiences the highest exposures to naphthalene and α-pinene. High exposure may be attributed to the scenarios developed within this project, which follow a 'most-representative worst-case scenario' strategy for exposure and health risk assessment. Despite the above limitations, this is the first comprehensive study that provides exposure estimates for 8 population groups across Europe exposed to 6 priority pollutants, as a result of the use of 15 consumer product classes in households, while accounting for regional differences in uses, use scenarios and ventilation conditions of each region.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Role of human CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 in naphthalene bioactivation and toxicity in the lung and nasal mucosa of a CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mouse

Authors: Li, L; Jia, K; Hartog, M; Wang, Y; Van Winkle, L; Ding, X (2014) FASEB Journal 28:LB636. [Abstract] HERO ID: 3036124

[Less] The aim of this study is to characterize the expression and activity of CYP2A13 and CYP2F1, two human . . . [More] The aim of this study is to characterize the expression and activity of CYP2A13 and CYP2F1, two human P450 enzymes expressed preferentially in the respiratory tract. CYP2A and CYP2F enzymes have been reported to metabolize many lung toxicants, including naphthalene (NA). The function of human CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 in NA bioactivation and respiratory tract toxicity was examined in this study using CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mice and CYP2A13(only)-humanized mice (on Cyp2abfgs-null background). In vitro studies indicated that, while the activity in the nasal olfactory mucosa (OM) of the CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mice was primarily contributed by CYP2A13, the activity in the lung was mainly contributed by CYP2F1. Further in vivo studies were conducted, in order to assess the capabilities of CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 to mediate acute inhalation toxicity of NA, at an NA dose relevant to occupational exposure (10 ppm for 4 h). CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mice showed greater sensitivity than Cyp2abfgs-null mice did, to NA-induced depletion of non-protein sulfhydryl and occurrence of cytotoxicity (observable by routine histology) in the OM (but not lung), when examined at 2 or 24 h after termination of NA exposure. However, preliminary results showed that the lungs of NA-treated CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mice had greater numbers of dye-permeable (injured) cells than that of NA-treated Cyp2abfgs-null mice, in both proximal and distal bronchioles, when examined using an ethidium homodimer incorporation assay, which is more sensitive than routine histology examination. These results demonstrate that both CYP2A13 and CYP2F1 are active toward NA in the lung and OM of the CYP2A13/2F1-humanized mice, and they play a significant role in NA-induced toxicity.