Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Naphthalene


100 References Were Found:

Journal Article
Journal Article

Lung injury repair by transplantation of adult lung cells following preconditioning of recipient mice

Authors: Milman Krentsis, I; Rosen, C; Shezen, E; Aronovich, A; Nathanson, B; Bachar-Lustig, E; Berkman, N; Assayag, M; Shakhar, G; Feferman, T; Orgad, R; Reisner, Y (2018) 7:68-77. HERO ID: 5018274

[Less] Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We recently demonstrated that . . . [More] Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We recently demonstrated that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development are enriched with lung progenitors, and that a single cell suspension of canalicular lungs can be used for transplantation, provided that lung progenitor niches in the recipient mice are vacated by strategies similar to those used in bone marrow transplantation. Considering the ethical limitations associated with the use of fetal cells, we investigated here whether adult lungs could offer an alternative source of lung progenitors for transplantation. We show that intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of adult mouse lungs from GFP+ donors, following conditioning of recipient mice with naphthalene and subsequent sublethal irradiation, led to marked colonization of the recipient lungs, at 6-8 weeks post-transplant, with donor derived structures including epithelial, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells. Epithelial cells within these donor-derived colonies expressed markers of functionally distinct lung cell types, and lung function, which is significantly compromised in mice treated with naphthalene and radiation, was found to be corrected following transplantation. Dose response analysis suggests that the frequency of patch forming cells in adult lungs was about threefold lower compared to that found in E16 fetal lungs. However, as adult lungs are much larger, the total number of patch forming cells that can be collected from this source is significantly greater. Our study provides proof of concept for lung regeneration by adult lung cells after preconditioning to vacate the pulmonary niche. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:68-77.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Lung regeneration after toxic injury is improved in absence of dioxin receptor

Authors: Morales-Hernández, A; Nacarino-Palma, A; Moreno-Marín, N; Barrasa, E; Paniagua-Quiñones, B; Catalina-Fernández, I; Alvarez-Barrientos, A; Bustelo, XR; Merino, JM; Fernández-Salguero, PM (2017) Stem Cell Research 25:61-71. HERO ID: 5018522

[Less] Recent experimental evidences from cellular systems and from mammalian and non-mammalian animal models . . . [More] Recent experimental evidences from cellular systems and from mammalian and non-mammalian animal models highlight novel functions for the aryl hydrocarbon/dioxin receptor (AhR) in maintaining cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis. Notably, AhR depletion stimulates an undifferentiated and pluripotent phenotype likely associated to a mesenchymal transition in epithelial cells and to increased primary tumorigenesis and metastasis in melanoma. In this work, we have used a lung model of epithelial regeneration to investigate whether AhR regulates proper tissue repair by adjusting the expansion of undifferentiated stem-like cells. AhR-null mice developed a faster and more efficient repair of the lung bronchiolar epithelium upon naphthalene injury that required increased cell proliferation and the earlier activation of stem-like Clara, Basal and neuroepithelial cells precursors. Increased basal content in multipotent Sca1+/CD31-/CD4- cells and in cells expressing pluripotency factors NANOG and OCT4 could also improve re-epithelialization in AhR-null lungs. The reduced response of AhR-deficient lungs to Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) repression shortly after injury may also help their improved bronchiolar epithelium repair. These results support a role for AhR in the regenerative response against toxins, and open the possibility of modulating its activation level to favor recovery from lesions caused by environmental contaminants.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Impaired self-healing capacity in airway epithelia lacking aquaporin-3

Authors: Zhu, HX; Zhou, JB; Zhu, XD; Zhou, J; Li, J; Song, YL; Bai, CX (2016) Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology 233:66-72. HERO ID: 3453271

[Less] In this study, we utilized AQP3-knockout mice as the in vivo model and AQP3-knockdown human bronchial . . . [More] In this study, we utilized AQP3-knockout mice as the in vivo model and AQP3-knockdown human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) as the in vitro model. Airway injury was experimentally induced by intra-tracheal injection of naphthalene. HE staining, transmission and scanning electron microscope were performed to evaluate self-healing capacity in vivo. Transwell and wound-healing assays were performed to evaluate epithelial cell migration in vitro. We found that both the airway epithelial cells of AQP3-knockout mice and AQP3-knockdown HBECs exhibited an obviously impaired self-healing capacity with defective epithelial cell migration through AQP3-facilitated glycerol transport. In addition, glycerol supplementation could largely correct defective injury healing and epithelial cell migration. For the first time, we found evidence for distinct defects in AQP3-deficient airway epithelial cell migration. Mechanistic analysis showed AQP3-facillitated glycerol transport plays a role in airway epithelial self-healing after injury.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Little evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a murine model of airway fibrosis induced by repeated naphthalene exposure

Authors: Watanabe, O; Tsuji, T; Kikuchi, R; Itoh, M; Nakamura, H; Aoshiba, K (2016) Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology 68:517-520. HERO ID: 3453312

[Less] Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in the pathogenesis . . . [More] Recent evidence suggests that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in the pathogenesis of airway obstructive diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation. However, whether EMT occurs in an experimental model of airway fibrosis is not well known. We explored evidence of EMT in a murine model of airway fibrosis induced by repeated exposure to naphthalene. Mice were administered intraperitoneal injections of naphthalene or corn oil vehicle once weekly for 14 consecutive weeks. The animals were sacrificed 5days after the final injection of naphthalene or corn oil vehicle. EMT was evaluated in lung tissue sections using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Repeated naphthalene exposure induced loss of club cells, hyperplasia of epithelial cells and peribronchial fibrosis. However, we did not find any loss of E-cadherin expression or any acquisition of vimentin, S100A4 or αSMA in epithelial cells in control or naphthalene-exposed mice. These results suggest that EMT does not contribute significantly to naphthalene-induced airway fibrosis in mice.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Adrenomedullin regulates club cell recovery following lung epithelial injury

Authors: García-Sanmartín, J; Larrayoz, IM; Martínez, A (2016) Histology and Histopathology 31:663-673. HERO ID: 3452823

[Less] The equilibrium between lung epithelium damage and recovery in the context of chronic injury is at the . . . [More] The equilibrium between lung epithelium damage and recovery in the context of chronic injury is at the basis of numerous lung diseases, including lung cancer and COPD. Understanding the contribution of growth factors and other molecular intermediates to this crosstalk may help in devising new therapeutic approaches. To better understand the contribution of adrenomedullin (AM) to lung homeostasis, we built club cell-specific conditional knockout (KO) mice for AM and subjected them to naphthalene injury. Untreated KO mice had lower levels of club cell 10 KDa protein (CC10) immunoreactivity than their wild type (WT) littermates in both terminal and regular bronchioles. Naphthalene injury resulted in a rapid necrosis of club cells followed by a progressive recovery of the epithelium. Club cells proliferated at higher rates in the KO mice and at 21 days post-injury the club cell coverage of the main bronchioles was higher and more homogeneous than in the WT animals. In conclusion, the paracrine/autocrine influence of AM in club cells subtly modulates their proliferation and spreading kinetics during lung epithelium recovery.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Combining an epithelial repair factor and anti-fibrotic with a corticosteroid offers optimal treatment for allergic airways disease

Authors: Patel, KP; Giraud, AS; Samuel, CS; Royce, SG (2016) British Journal of Pharmacology 173:2016-2029. HERO ID: 3456722


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Use of nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics to characterize the biochemical effects of naphthalene on various organs of tolerant mice

Authors: Lin, CY; Huang, FP; Ling, YS; Liang, HJ; Lee, SH; Hu, MY; Tsao, PN (2015) PLoS ONE 10:e0120429. HERO ID: 3035733

[Less] Naphthalene, the most common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, causes airway epithelium injury in mice. . . . [More] Naphthalene, the most common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, causes airway epithelium injury in mice. Repeated exposure of mice to naphthalene induces airway epithelia that are resistant to further injury. Previous studies revealed that alterations in bioactivation enzymes and increased levels of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthase in the bronchioles protect tolerant mice from naphthalene and its reactive metabolites. In our current study, tolerance was induced in male ICR mice using a total of 7 daily intraperitoneal injections of naphthalene (200 mg/kg). Both naphthalene-tolerant and non-tolerant mice were challenged with a dose of 300 mg/kg naphthalene on day 8 to investigate metabolite differences. The lungs, liver, and kidneys were collected for histopathology 24 h after the challenge dose. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and both hydrophilic and hydrophobic extracts from each organ were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The histological results showed no observable injuries to the airway epithelium of naphthalene-tolerant mice when compared with the control. In contrast, airway injuries were observed in mice given a single challenge dose (injury mice). The metabolomics analysis revealed that the energy metabolism in the lungs of tolerant and injury mice was significantly perturbed. However, antioxidant metabolites, such as glutathione and succinate, were significantly increased in the lungs of tolerant mice, suggesting a role for these compounds in the protection of organs from naphthalene-induced electrophilic metabolites and free radicals. Damage to the airway cellular membrane, as shown by histopathological results and increased acetone in the BALF and perturbation of hydrophobic lung extracts, including cholesterol, phosphorylcholine-containing lipids, and fatty acyl chains, were observed in injury mice. Consistent with our histopathological results, fewer metabolic effects were observed in the liver and kidney of mice after naphthalene treatments. In conclusion, NMR-based metabolomics reveals possible mechanisms of naphthalene tolerance and naphthalene-induced toxicity in the respiratory system of mice.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The LIM-domain only protein 4 contributes to lung epithelial cell proliferation but is not essential for tumor progression

Authors: Holik, AZ; Filby, CE; Pasquet, J; Viitaniemi, K; Ciciulla, J; Sutherland, KD; Asselin-Labat, ML (2015) Respiratory Research 16:67. HERO ID: 2966007

[Less] BACKGROUND: The lung is constantly exposed to environmental challenges and must rapidly . . . [More] BACKGROUND: The lung is constantly exposed to environmental challenges and must rapidly respond to external insults. Mechanisms involved in the repair of the damaged lung involve expansion of different epithelial cells to repopulate the injured cellular compartment. However, factors regulating cell proliferation following lung injury remain poorly understood. Here we studied the role of the transcriptional regulator Lmo4 during lung development, in the regulation of adult lung epithelial cell proliferation following lung damage and in the context of oncogenic transformation.

METHODS: To study the role of Lmo4 in embryonic lung development, lung repair and tumorigenesis, we used conditional knock-out mice to delete Lmo4 in lung epithelial cells from the first stages of lung development. The role of Lmo4 in lung repair was evaluated using two experimental models of lung damage involving chemical and viral injury. The role of Lmo4 in lung tumorigenesis was measured using a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma in which the oncogenic K-Ras protein has been knocked into the K-Ras locus. Overall survival difference between genotypes was tested by log rank test. Difference between means was tested using one-way ANOVA after assuring that assumptions of normality and equality of variance were satisfied.

RESULTS: We found that Lmo4 was not required for normal embryonic lung morphogenesis. In the adult lung, loss of Lmo4 reduced epithelial cell proliferation and delayed repair of the lung following naphthalene or flu-mediated injury, suggesting that Lmo4 participates in the regulation of epithelial cell expansion in response to cellular damage. In the context of K-Ras(G12D)-driven lung tumor formation, Lmo4 loss did not alter overall survival but delayed initiation of lung hyperplasia in K-Ras(G12D) mice sensitized by naphthalene injury. Finally, we evaluated the expression of LMO4 in tissue microarrays of early stage non-small cell lung cancer and observed that LMO4 is more highly expressed in lung squamous cell carcinoma compared to adenocarcinoma.

CONCLUSIONS: Together these results show that the transcriptional regulator Lmo4 participates in the regulation of lung epithelial cell proliferation in the context of injury and oncogenic transformation but that Lmo4 depletion is not sufficient to prevent lung repair or tumour formation.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Preconditioning allows engraftmentof mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice

Authors: Rosen, C; Shezen, E; Aronovich, A; Klionsky, YZ; Yaakov, Y; Assayag, M; Biton, IEti; Tal, O; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, H; Shneider, D; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, O; Evron, S; Freud, E; Shoseyov, D; Wilschanski, M; Berkman, N; Fibbe, WE; Hagin, D; Hillel-Karniel, C; Krentsis, IM; Bachar-Lustig, E; Reisner, Y (2015) Nature Medicine 21:869-879. HERO ID: 3036172

[Less] Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse . . . [More] Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

Authors: Toba, H; Wang, Y; Bai, X; Zamel, R; Cho, HR; Liu, H; Lira, A; Keshavjee, S; Liu, M (2015) 6:30803-30817. HERO ID: 3035958

[Less] Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a . . . [More] Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway.