Health & Environmental Research Online (HERO)


Tetrachloroethylene (Perc) (Final, 2012)

Show Project Details Hide Project Details
2,052 References Were Found:

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Trichloroacetic acid: Updated estimates of its bioavailability and its contribution to trichloroethylene-induced mouse hepatomegaly

Author: Chiu, WA (2011) Toxicology 285:114-125. HERO ID: 729640

[Less] Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is a common drinking water disinfection byproduct that produces a spectrum . . . [More] Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is a common drinking water disinfection byproduct that produces a spectrum of liver effects, including hepatomegaly and liver tumors, in mice. It is also an oxidative metabolite of trichloroethylene (TCE), a solvent used in degreasing with widespread environmental exposure, which also produces hepatomegaly and liver tumors in mice. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of TCE and TCA can be used to quantitatively compare the dose-responses for hepatomegaly for these two chemicals on the basis of internal TCA dose, and thereby test the hypothesis that TCA could fully explain TCE-induced hepatomegaly. Previously, using a PBPK model calibrated using kinetic data from i.v. and gavage dosing of TCA and from TCA produced from TCE, it was concluded that TCA accounted for only about one-fifth of the degree of hepatomegaly produced by TCE. However, recently available data suggest a non-linear change in internal TCA dose attributed to a dose-dependent fractional absorption of TCA administered in drinking water, the primary route of exposure of TCA both environmentally and in experimental toxicity studies. Therefore, in the present reanalysis, the PBPK modeling of TCA was updated using these data and the comparison between TCA- and TCE-induced hepatomegaly was revisited using updated internal dose predictions. With respect to updated PBPK modeling results, incorporating less than complete absorption of TCA administered in drinking water substantially improves the PBPK model fit to the newly available data, based on goodness-of-fit comparison. However, inter-experimental variability is high, with nearly complete absorption estimated for some studies. With respect to the comparison of TCA and TCA-induced hepatomegaly, this reanalysis predicts that TCA can account for roughly one-third to one-half of the effect observed with TCE - greater than previously reported, but still inconsistent with TCA being the sole active moiety for this effect. However, given uncertainty as to the precise degree of contribution of TCA and due to high inter-experimental variability in estimated fractional absorption, a more precise quantitative estimate of the relative contribution of TCA may obtained through an appropriate experiment in mice simultaneously measuring TCA kinetics and TCE- and TCA-induced hepatomegaly.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Mortality and end-stage renal disease incidence among dry cleaning workers

Authors: Calvert, GM; Ruder, AM; Petersen, MR (2011) Occupational and Environmental Medicine 68:709-716. HERO ID: 670877

[Less] Objective: Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a known animal carcinogen and probable human carcinogen. Dry cleaning . . . [More] Objective: Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a known animal carcinogen and probable human carcinogen. Dry cleaning exposures, particularly PCE, are also associated with renal toxicity. The objective was to follow-up a cohort of dry cleaners to evaluate mortality and assess end-stage renal disease (ESRD) morbidity.

Methods: This study adds 8 years of mortality follow-up for 1704 dry cleaning workers in four cities. Employees eligible for inclusion worked for ≥1 year before 1960 in a shop using PCE as the primary solvent. Life table analyses for mortality and ESRD morbidity were conducted. Only employees alive on 1 January 1977 were included in ESRD analyses.

Results: Overall cancer deaths were in significant excess in this cohort (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 1.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.36). Oesophageal, lung and tongue cancers had significant excesses of deaths. Oesophageal cancer risk was highest among those employed in a PCE-using shop for ≥5 years with ≥20 years' latency since first such employment. Deaths from non-malignant underlying diseases of the stomach and duodenum were in significant excess. Hypertensive ESRD morbidity was significantly elevated in the entire cohort (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 1.98, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.27), and among workers employed only in PCE-using dry cleaning shops for ≥5 years.

Conclusion: Employment in the dry cleaning industry and occupational exposure to PCE are associated with an increased risk for ESRD and for cancer at several sites. The employment duration findings for oesophageal cancer and hypertensive ESRD further support an association with PCE exposure instead of lifestyle or socioeconomic factors

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Cancer morbidity in Swedish dry-cleaners and laundry workers: Historically prospective cohort study

Authors: Seldén, AI; Ahlborg, G (2011) International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 84:435-443. HERO ID: 699243

[Less] PURPOSE: Despite decades of experimental and observational studies, the carcinogenic risks to humans . . . [More] PURPOSE: Despite decades of experimental and observational studies, the carcinogenic risks to humans associated with occupational exposure to perchloroethylene (PER) remain uncertain. The aims of the present study were to further examine the possible associations. METHODS: A national cohort of dry-cleaning and laundry workers (n = 10,389) assembled in 1984 was followed up for new cases of cancer by matching with the Swedish cancer register from 1985 to 2006 (inclusive), and the results were compared with expected frequencies derived from national reference data. RESULTS: Follow-up was complete for 90.9% of the cohort (2,810 men, 6,630 women). The overall standardised cancer incidence ratio (SIR) for all subjects was close to unity (SIR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.02) with a slightly more favourable outcome in women (SIR 0.91; 95% CI 0.85-0.98) than in men (SIR 1.10; 95% CI 0.99-1.23). Significantly elevated rates of lung cancer (SIR 1.45; 95% CI 1.03-1.98) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR 2.05; 95% CI 1.30-3.07) were seen in men, but for both types of cancer, the point estimates were similar in genuine laundry workers and dry-cleaners exposed to PER, respectively. There was no significant excess of cancer of the oesophagus, larynx, uterine cervix, liver, kidney or urinary bladder. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of individual or collective data on PER exposure from participating dry-cleaning shops and laundries involved and limited information on exposure time hampered the risk assessment related to PER. However, no clear association between PER exposure and subsequent cancer morbidity in the workers was evident from this historically prospective cohort.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Risk of lung cancer associated with quantitative beryllium exposure metrics within an occupational cohort

Authors: Schubauer-Berigan, MK; Deddens, JA; Couch, JR; Petersen, MR (2011) Occupational and Environmental Medicine 68:354-360. HERO ID: 667892

[Less] Objectives Beryllium has been identified as a human carcinogen on the basis of animal and epidemiological . . . [More] Objectives Beryllium has been identified as a human carcinogen on the basis of animal and epidemiological studies. The authors recently reported updated associations between lung cancer and beryllium exposure in a large, pooled occupational cohort. The authors conducted the present study to evaluate the shape of exposure-response associations between different exposure metrics and lung cancer in this cohort, considering potential confounders (race, plant, professional and short-term work status, and exposure to other lung carcinogens). Methods The authors conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analyses of lung cancer risk with cumulative, mean and maximum 'daily weighted average' (DWA) exposure among 5436 workers, using age-based risk sets. Different exposure-response curves were fitted to the exposure metrics, including categorical, power, restricted cubic spline and piecewise log-linear fits. Results The authors found significant positive associations between lung cancer and mean (p<0.0001) and maximum (p<0.0001) exposure, adjusting for age, birth cohort and plant, and for cumulative (p=0.0017) beryllium exposure, adjusting for these factors plus short-term work status and exposure to asbestos. The best-fitting models were generally categorical or piecewise log-linear, with the steepest increase in lung cancer risk between 0 and 10 μg/m(3) for both mean and maximum DWA exposure and between 0 and 200 μg/m(3)-days for cumulative DWA exposure. The estimated mean DWA beryllium exposure associated with 10(-3) excess lifetime risk based on the piecewise log-linear model is 0.033 μg/m(3). Conclusion This study provides evidence that lung cancer risk is elevated at levels near the current US Occupational Safety and Health Administration beryllium exposure limit of 2.0 μg/m(3) DWA for workers.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Comparison of exposure assessment methods for occupational carcinogens in a multi-centre lung cancer case-control study

Authors: Peters, S; Vermeulen, R; Cassidy, A; Mannetje, AT; van Tongeren, M; Boffetta, P; Straif, K; Kromhout, H (2011) Occupational and Environmental Medicine 68:148-153. HERO ID: 667997

[Less] Objectives Retrospective exposure assessment remains a problematic aspect of population-based case-control . . . [More] Objectives Retrospective exposure assessment remains a problematic aspect of population-based case-control studies. Different methods have been developed, including case-by-case expert assessment and job-exposure matrices (JEM). The present analyses compare exposure prevalence and risk estimates derived by different exposure assessment methods. Methods In the context of a case-control study conducted in seven European countries, exposure was estimated for asbestos, diesel motor emissions (DME) and crystalline silica, using three different assessment methods. First, experts assigned exposures to all reported jobs on a case-by-case basis. Second, a population-specific JEM (PSJEM) was developed using the expert assessments of controls only, and re-applied to all study subjects. Third, an independent general population JEM (GPJEM) was created by occupational exposure experts not involved in the original study, and applied to study subjects. Results from these methods were compared. Results There was poor to fair agreement in assigned exposure between expert assessment and the GPJEM (kappas: asbestos 0.17; DME 0.48; silica 0.38). Exposure prevalence was significantly heterogeneous (p<0.01) between countries for all three agents and assessment methods. For asbestos and DME, significant country heterogeneity in risk estimates was observed when using expert assessment. When applying the GPJEM, the heterogeneity in risk estimates for asbestos and, to some extent, silica diminished. Conclusions It has been previously advocated that the expert assessment approach to assign exposures based on detailed questionnaire responses provides more accurate exposure estimates than JEM-based results. However, current results demonstrated little, if any, advantage of case-by-case assessment when compared to a JEM approach.

Technical Report
Technical Report

Toxicological review of trichloroethylene (CASRN 79-01-6) in support of summary information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

Author: U.S. EPA (2011) (EPA/635/R-09/011F). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [EPA Report] HERO ID: 736089


Data/Software
Data/ Software

PERC risk assessment model

Authors: Chiu, WA; Ginsberg, GL (2011) [MCSim Code]. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [Database] HERO ID: 784005

Abstract: Use GNU MCSim Monte Carlo Simulation Software version 5.x to run attached code.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Exposure to tetrachloroethylene in dry cleaning shops in the Nordic countries

Authors: Lynge, E; Tinnerberg, H; Rylander, L; Romundstad, P; Johansen, K; Lindbohm, ML; Heikkilä, P; Westberg, H; Clausen, LB; Piombino, A; Thorsted, BL (2011) Annals of Occupational Hygiene 55:387-396. HERO ID: 716622

[Less] Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially . . . [More] Tetrachloroethylene is the dominant solvent used in dry cleaning worldwide and many workers are potentially exposed. We report here on results of 1296 measurements of tetrachloroethylene undertaken in Nordic dry cleaning shops 1947-2001.

We searched documents and files in the Nordic institutes of occupational health for air measurements of tetrachloroethylene. Repeated measurements from the same facility during a short time interval were registered only once using the time-weighted average. We registered also changes over time in occupational exposure limits (OELs) to tetrachloroethylene.

Only scattered measurements were available from the early years, and the exposure level seemed fairly stable up until the mid 1970s. The median exposure level was 20 p.p.m. in 1976 and decreased to 3 p.p.m. in 2000. Exposure levels in the four Nordic countries followed similar trends. In the late 1960s, the OELs varied between the Nordic countries from 30 to 100 p.p.m. Sweden was first to lower the limit, but limits gradually converged over time. At present, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden use 10 p.p.m., while Norway uses 6 p.p.m. Over time, the average observed exposure level was lower than the OEL in all countries, but in Denmark and Sweden, up to one-third of measured exposures exceeded the OEL. Overall, the stationary measurements for maintenance work showed 36 p.p.m., while the personal measurements showed 7.5 p.p.m. for dry cleaners and 6.25 p.p.m. for shop assistants.

The Nordic data illustrate that it is possible over time to control chemical exposures even in an industry consisting of many small and scattered work places.

The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

The ghost of methods past: Exposure assessment versus job-exposure matrix studies

Author: Burstyn, I (2011) HERO ID: 667894


The "refereed" or "peer review" status of a journal comes from the Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory (http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/), as supplied by the publisher. The term refers to the system of critical evaluation of manuscripts/articles by professional colleagues or peers. The content of refereed publications is sanctioned, vetted, or otherwise approved by a peer-review or editorial board. The peer-review and evaluation system is utilized to protect, maintain, and raise the quality of scholarly material published in serials. Publications subject to the referee process are assumed, then, to contain higher quality content than those that are not.
Peer Reviewed Journal Article

Occupation and risk of lymphoma: A multicentre prospective cohort study (EPIC)

Authors: Neasham, D; Sifi, A; Nielsen, KR; Overvad, K; Raaschou-Nielsen, O; Tjønneland, A; Barricarte, A; González, CA; Navarro, C; Rodriguez Suarez, L; Travis, RC; Key, T; Linseisen, J; Kaaks, R; Crosignani, P; Berrino, F; Rosso, S; Mattiello, A; Vermeulen, RC; Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB; Berglund, G; Manjer, J; Zackrisson, S; Hallmans, G; Malmer, B; Bingham, S; Khaw, KT; Bergmann, MM; Boeing, H; Trichopoulou, A; Masala, G; Tumino, R; Lund, E; Slimani, N; Ferrari, P; Boffetta, P; Vineis, P; Riboli, E (2011) Occupational and Environmental Medicine 68:77-81. HERO ID: 668156

[Less] Objectives Evidence suggests that certain occupations and related exposures may increase the risk of . . . [More] Objectives Evidence suggests that certain occupations and related exposures may increase the risk of malignant lymphoma. Farming, printing and paper industry, wood processing, meat handling and processing, welding, shoe and leather manufacturing and teaching profession are among the categories that have been implicated in previous studies. The relationship between occupation and malignant lymphoma has been investigated in a large European prospective study.

Methods We investigated occupational risks for lymphomas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The mean follow-up time for 348 555 subjects was 9 years (SD: 2 years). The analysis was based on 866 and 48 newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). These were identified in the EPIC subcohorts with occupational data. Data on 52 occupations were collected through standardised questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between occupation and risk of malignant lymphoma.

Results The following occupations were positively associated with malignant NHL after adjustment for study centre, age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), smoking and alcohol: butchers (HR=1.53, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.48, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.30, 95% CI 1.00 to 2.66, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma) and car repair workers (HR=1.50, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.00, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.31, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma). HL was associated with gasoline station occupation (HR=4.59, 95% CI 1.08 to 19.6).

Conclusion The findings in this current study of a higher risk of NHL among car repair workers and butchers and a higher risk of HL among gasoline station workers suggest a possible role from occupationally related exposures, such as solvents and zoonotic viruses, as risk factors for malignant lymphoma.