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3378314 
Journal Article 
Resveratrol ameliorates benzo(a)pyrene-induced testicular dysfunction and apoptosis: Involvement of p38 MAPK/ATF2/iNOS signaling 
Banerjee, B; Nandi, P; Chakraborty, S; Raha, S; Sen, PC; Jana, K 
2016 
Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
ISSN: 0955-2863
EISSN: 1873-4847 
34 
17-29 
English 
Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] is an environmental toxicant that alters the steroidogenic profile of testis and induces testicular dysfunction. In the present study, we have investigated the molecular signaling of B(a)P and the ameliorative potential of the natural aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist and antioxidant, resveratrol, on B(a)P-induced male reproductive toxicity. Studies showed that B(a)P treatment resulted in p38 MAPK activation and increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production along with testicular apoptosis and steroidogenic dysfunction. Resveratrol cotreatment maintained testicular redox potential, increased serum testosterone level and enhanced expression of major testicular steroidogenic proteins (CYPIIA1, StAR, 3βHSD, 17βHSD) and prevented subsequent onset of apoptosis. Resveratrol cotreatment resulted inhibition of testicular cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) expression, which is the major B(a)P metabolizing agent for BPDE-DNA adduct formation. Resveratrol also significantly decreased the B(a)P-induced AhR protein level, its nuclear translocation and subsequent promoter activation, thereby decreased the expression of CYP1A1. Resveratrol also down-regulated B(a)P-induced testicular iNOS production through suppressing the activation of p38 MAPK and ATF2, thus improved the oxidative status of the testis and prevented apoptosis. Our findings cumulatively suggest that resveratrol inhibits conversion of B(a)P into BPDE by modulating the transcriptional regulation of CYP1A1 and acting as an antioxidant thus prevents B(a)P-induced oxidative stress and testicular apoptosis. 
IRIS
• Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)
     August 2016 Update
          Animal Studies