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5081319 
Journal Article 
Maternal serum concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances and birth size in British boys 
Marks, KJ; Cutler, AJ; Jeddy, Z; Northstone, K; Kato, K; Hartman, TJ 
2019 
Yes 
International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health
ISSN: 1438-4639
EISSN: 1618-131X 
222 
889-895 
English 
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been widely used in commercial and industrial manufacturing processes since the 1950s. Inverse associations between prenatal exposure to PFAS and birth size have been found in populations around the globe. This study examined the association of prenatal maternal serum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and birth size in British boys. The study included 457 mother-son dyads participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Birth weight (g), crown to heel length (cm), and head circumference (cm) were collected at delivery. PFAS were detected in all maternal serum samples during pregnancy (median: 30 weeks gestation (interquartile range: 12-33)). Median concentrations (interquartile range) were 13.8 ng/mL (11.0, 17.7), 3.0 ng/mL (2.3, 3.8), 1.9 ng/mL (1.4, 2.5), and 0.4 ng/mL (0.3, 0.5) for PFOS, PFOA, PFHxS, and PFNA, respectively. In multivariable linear regression models, inverse associations were detected between PFOS (continuous) and birth weight (β = -8.50 g, 95% CI = -15.93, -1.07 g), crown to heel length (β = -0.04 cm, 95% CI = -0.08, -0.01 cm), and head circumference (β = -0.02 cm, 95% CI = -0.04, -0.002 cm). In conclusion, prenatal exposure to high levels of PFOS may be associated with reduced birth size in male infants. 
ALSPAC; Endocrine disruptors; Perfluoroalkyl substances; Birth size; Birth weight 
• PFHxS
     LitSearch: Feb 2018 - May 2019
          PubMed
          ToxNet
• PFNA
     PFNA May 2019 Update
          Pubmed