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3230224 
Journal Article 
Racial and ethnic variations in phthalate metabolite concentration changes across full-term pregnancies 
James-Todd, TM; Meeker, JD; Huang, T; Hauser, R; Seely, EW; Ferguson, KK; Rich-Edwards, JW; Mcelrath, TF 
2017 
Yes 
Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
ISSN: 1559-0631
EISSN: 1559-064X 
27 
160-166 
English 
Higher concentrations of certain phthalate metabolites are associated with adverse reproductive and pregnancy outcomes, as well as poor infant/child health outcomes. In non-pregnant populations, phthalate metabolite concentrations vary by race/ethnicity. Few studies have documented racial/ethnic differences between phthalate metabolite concentrations at multiple time points across the full-course of pregnancy. The objective of the study was to characterize the change in phthalate metabolite concentrations by race/ethnicity across multiple pregnancy time points. Women were participants in a prospectively collected pregnancy cohort who delivered at term (≥37 weeks) and had available urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations for ≥3 time points across full-term pregnancies (n=350 women). We assessed urinary concentrations of eight phthalate metabolites that were log-transformed and specific gravity-adjusted. We evaluated the potential racial/ethnic differences in phthalate metabolite concentrations at baseline (median 10 weeks gestation) using ANOVA and across pregnancy using linear mixed models to calculate the percent change and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. Almost 30% of the population were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic. With the exception of mono-(3-carboxypropyl) (MCPP) and di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolites, baseline levels of phthalate metabolites were significantly higher in non-whites (P<0.05). When evaluating patterns by race/ethnicity, mono-ethyl phthalate (MEP) and MCPP had significant percent changes across pregnancy. MEP was higher in Hispanics at baseline and decreased in mid-pregnancy but increased in late pregnancy for non-Hispanic blacks. MCPP was substantially higher in non-Hispanic blacks at baseline but decreased later in pregnancy. Across pregnancy, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women had higher concentrations of certain phthalate metabolites. These differences may have implications for racial/ethnic differences in adverse pregnancy and child health outcomes.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 10 February 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.2. 
Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts; Health & Safety Science Abstracts; Phthalic acid; Infants; Gestation; Phthalates; Pregnancy; Metabolites; Ethnic groups; ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety; X 24350:Industrial Chemicals; H 12000:Epidemiology and Public Health 
IRIS
• Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP)
     Database Searches
          Litsearch Jan 2016 - July 2016
               Pubmed
          LitSearch Jan 2017 - July 2017
               Pubmed
     Excluded: No Primary Data on Health Effects
          Exposure levels
• Diethyl phthalate (DEP)
     Database searches
          Jun 2016 update
               Pubmed
          Jul 2017 update
               Web of Science
          Jan 2020 update
               PubMed
               Web of Science
     Excluded: No Primary Data on Health Effects
          Exposure levels
• Phthalates – Targeted Search for Epidemiological Studies
     Source – all searches
          Pubmed
          WOS
     Excluded
     Source - Jun 2016 Update (Private)
          Pubmed
     Source - August 2017 Update (Private)
          Pubmed
          WOS
     Source - August 2018 Update
          WOS
          Toxline
          Level 1 Screen - Title & Abstract
               Excluded